background image

background image

background image

This edition first published in 2014 by
Disinformation Books
An imprint of Red Wheel/Weiser, 

LLC

with offices at:
665 Third Street, Suite 400
San Francisco, CA 94107

www.redwheelweiser.com

Copyright © 2003 The Disinformation Company Ltd. All rights reserved.
No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or
by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording,
or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in
writing from Red Wheel/Weiser, LLC. Originally published by The
Disinformation Company Ltd., 2003. ISBN: 978-0-9713942-7-8. Reviewers
may quote brief passages.

All the articles in this book are copyright © by their respective authors
and/or original publishers, except as specified herein, and we note and thank
them for their kind permission.

ISBN: 978-1-938875-10-6

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data available upon request

Book design: Tomo Makiura, Paul Pollard, and Kate Bingaman for P&M,
NY
Cover design by Jim Warner

Printed in the United States of America

EBM

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Disinformation is a registered trademark of The Disinformation Company
Ltd.


background image

The opinions and statements made in this book are those of the authors
concerned. The Disinformation Company Ltd. has not verified and neither
confirms nor denies any of the foregoing and no warranty or fitness is
implied. The reader is encouraged to keep an open mind and to
independently judge the contents.

www.redwheelweiser.com
www.redwheelweiser.com/newsletter


background image

Table of Contents

Dedication

PREFACE

Introduction

MAGICK IN THEORY AND PRACTICE

POP MAGIC!

THINKING ABOUT IT

FIRST STEPS ON THE PATH

HOW TO BE A MAGICIAN

HOW TO BE A MAGICIAN 2

HOW TO BE A MAGICIAN 3

MAGICAL CONSCIOUSNESS

EXPERIMENT:

EXPERIMENT:

APPLIED MAGIC

THE MAGICAL RECORD

BANISHING

SIGILS

SIGILS: DISPOSAL

VIRAL SIGILS

EXPERIMENT:

HYPERSIGILS

EXPERIMENT:

HOW TO CHAT UP GODS

HOW MANY HERMES?

EXPERIMENT:


background image

DEMONS ARE...

EXPERIMENT:

HEALING

EXPERIMENT:

DUDE, WHERE'S MY EGO?

THE ABYSS

EXPERIMENT:

REVOLT INTO MAGIC!

THE EXECUTABLE DREAMTIME

WORD AND WILL

RHETORIC AND REASON

WORD AND WORLD

THEE SPLINTER TEST

SKILLFUL SPLINTERING CAN GENERATE MANIFESTATION.

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX A.]

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX B.]

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX C.]

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX D.]

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX E.]

MEMENTO MORI - Remember You Must Die

I. (THANATAESTHETICS)

II. (THE TRIMURTI OF DEATH)

PERSPECTIVE ONE:

PERSPECTIVE TWO:

PERSPECTIVE THREE:

Endnotes

JOE IS IN THE DETAILS

ARE YOU ILLUMINATED?

INITIATION AS A PROCESS

CRISIS AND CALL


background image

THE INITIATORY SICKNESS

THE DARK NIGHT OF THE SOUL

MACRO AND MICRO-INITIATIONS

GETTING THE FEAR

RELAX INTO FEAR

SAHAJA

INNERWORLD CONFRONTATIONS

ILLUMINATION

GNOSIS

CHEMOGNOSIS

TRYPTAMINE HALLUCINOGENS AND CONSCIOUSNESS

An Extended Excerpt from BREAKING OPEN THE HEAD

1. Not for Human Consumption

2. New Sensations

3. Magical Thinking

ICONS

KICK THAT HABIT - Brion Gysin-His Life & Magick

THE DREAM MACHINE

MAGICK

GYSIN IN PARIS

THE CUT-UP TECHNIQUE

WHO IS THERE WILLIAM BURROUGHS

Endnotes

MAGICK SQUARES AND FUTURE BEATS - The Magical Processes and
Methods of William ...

BEING THE FIRST PART: CHANGE THE WAY TO PERCEIVE
AND CHANGE ALL MEMORY

BEING THE SECOND PART: IN A PRE-RECORDED UNIVERSE
WHO MADE THE FIRST RECORDINGS?


background image

BEING THE THIRD (MIND) PART: NOTHING HERE NOW BUT
THEE RECORDINGS

A CASSETTE TAPE RECORDER AS A MAGICKAL WEAPON:

BEING THE FOURTH PART: LOOK AT THAT PICTURE IS IT
PERSISTING?

NOTE: THE DISCIPLINE OF DO EASY

Endnotes:

AUSTIN OSMAN SPARE - Divine Draughtman

ZOS AND KIA

SPARE'S MAGICAL COSMOLOGY

SIGILS AND ECSTASY

Endnotes

VIRTUAL MIRRORS IN SOLID TIME - The Prophetic Portals of Austin
Osman Spare

CALLING CTHULHU - HP Lovecraft's Magick Realism

A PULP POE

THE HORROR OF REASON

CHAOS CULTURE

PROOF IN THE PUDDING

WRITING THE DREAM...

...AND DREAMING THE BOOK

Excerpt from THE ROAD OF EXCESS

FULL MOON AT BOU SAADA

BOU SAADA DECODED.

Endnotes

LEARY AND CROWLEY - An Excerpt from Cosmic Trigger

Starseed

A MESSAGE FROM COSMIC CENTRAL?

SOME EGYPTIAN GODS INTRUDE ON THE NARRATIVE AND
OUR LADY OF SPACE SPEAKS AGAIN


background image

Endnotes

THE GREAT BEAST 666

SIX VOICES ON CROWLEY

“DO WHAT THOU WILT”

THE BOOK OF THE LAW

THE TREE OF LIFE

SPIRITUAL PRACTICE

TRUTH AND FALSEHOOD

SEX MAGICK AND SUFFRAGE

DRUGS AND SPIRITUAL PRACTICE

CHRIST AND LUCIFER

CROWLEY'S PERSONALITY

READING CROWLEY

ALEISTER CROWLEY AS GURU

Endnote

THE ENOCHIAN APOCALYPSE

A SAINT AND A ROGUE

THE REALITY OF THE ENOCHIAN ANGELS

THE GATES AND THE KEYS

THE NATURE OF THE APOCALYPSE

ENTER, THE GREAT BEAST

A MENTAL ARMAGEDDON

Endnotes

THE CRYING OF LIBER 49 - Jack Parsons, Antichrist Superstar

“FOR I AM BABALON, AND SHE MY DAUGHTER, UNIQUE AND
THERE SHALL BE NO OTHER ...

HECATE RISING...

JAMES DEAN OF THE OCCULT

“ONLY IN THE IRRATIONAL AND UNKNOWN DIRECTION CAN


background image

WE COME TO IT [WISDOM] ...

A MAGICAL CALL TO ARMS

SCARLE WOMEN

CAMERON - The Wormwood Star

THE BIRTH OF BABALON

THE RED WITCH

Endnotes

IDA CRADDOCK - Sexual Mystic and Martyr for Freedom

REFERENCES

ROSALEEN NORTON - Pan's Daughter

THE GODS, IN THEIR OWN RIGHT

Endnotes

SECRET SOCIETIES

MAGICAL BLITZKRIEG - Hitler and the Occult Peter Levenda Interview

THE HISTORY

DIETRICH ECKART

ALFRED ROSENBURG

WILHELM GUTBERLET

RUDOLF HESS

HIMMLER AND THE S.S.

THE ALLIED OCCULT OFFENSE

Endnotes

THAT WHICH HAS FALLEN

HALO OF FLIES

ORDO TEMPLI ORIENTIS AND GNOSTIC CATHOLIC CHURCH

THELEMA AND LOSS OF IDENTITY

OUT OF THE CLOSETS

HARE RAMA HARE SUPERMARKET


background image

MANUFACTURED GNOSIS

WE ARE BORG ...

... AND DAMAGED

FRANZ KAFKA'S PROCESS

THE ODOR OF THE O.T.O.

AURA OF THE O.T.O. PHENOMENON

CYBERCATACOMBS

FAHRENHEIT 418

I AM THE BRAND NAME

THE SECRET HISTORY OF MODERN WITCHCRAFT

THE LEGEND OF WITCHCRAFT AND THE ORIGIN OF WICCA

ORIGINS IN DREAMLAND

THE DEVIL, YOU SAY

THE CHARTER AND THE BOOK (BEING A RADICAL
REVISIONIST HISTORY OF THE ORIGINS OF ...

WAITING FOR THE MAN FROM CANADA

THE REAL ORIGIN OF WICCA

WICCA AS AN O.T.O. ENCAMPMENT

Endnotes

SYMPATHY FOR THE

ANTON LAVEY - A Fireside Chat With the Black Pope

SEASON OF THE WITCH

(OCCULT WAR)

THE ADVENT OF AHRIMAN An Essay on the Deep Forces Behind the
World-Crisis

AUTHOR'S PREFACE

SPIRIT AND SOUL

SPIRITUAL BEINGS AND EARTHLY EVOLUTION

AHRIMAN IN MODERN TIMES


background image

THE DEGRADATION OF LANGUAGE

THE AHRIMANIZATION OF CULTURE

GOOD AND EVIL

BACONIAN AND GOETHEAN SCIENCE

AN EVOLUTIONARY LEAP

TURNING EVIL TO GOOD

THE EPOCH OF CONSCIOUSNESS

SOME OCCULT POLITICS

Endnote

JULIUS EVOLA'S COMBAT MANUALS FOR A REVOLT AGAINST
THE MODERN WORLD

Endnotes

THE OCCULT WAR - Excerpt From Men Among the Ruins

WEAPONS IN THE OCCULT WAR

Endnotes

SECRET OF THE ASSASSINS

SORCERY

The universe wants to play.

MEDIA HEX - The Occult Assault on Institutions

Endnotes

THE SECRET OF THE GOTHICK GOD OF DARKNESS

THE GOTHICK GOD

THE SECRET

CONTRIBUTORS

ARTICLE HISTORIES


background image

To Nimrod Erez, Bradley Novicoff, Mike Backes, my beautiful angel

Naomi Nelson, and my partner in Disinformation, Gary Baddeley


background image

PREFACE

GRANT MORRISON

Magic, you say?

Me, I'm a hard-nosed skeptic, when all's said and done. Try as I might, I can't
find any convincing evidence to support the notion that flying saucers come
from  other  planets  to  visit  us,  I  don't  “believe”  in  reincarnation,  the  Loch
Ness Monster, ghosts of the dead, news reports, the objectivity of Science or
the  literal  truth  of  Bible  stories.  In  an  overloaded,  supersaturated
mediasphere, my own best compass is the evidence of my senses.

Having said that, in the course of 24 years of almost daily occult practice and
exploration, some very bizarre things have manifested in front of my lovely,
flaring  nostrils  and  I've  been  forced  to  alter  my  view  of  life,  death  and
“reality” accordingly.

Because whether you “believe” in it or not, whether you like it or not, magic
WORKS (I use the devalued word “magic” precisely because I'm amused by
its  associations  with  illusion,  conjuring  and  deception,  whereas  Richard
Metzger  prefers  to  use  the  High-spelling  form  “magick,”  in  honor  of  the
heroic and misunderstood Aleister Crowley who broke centuries of Church-
imposed  silence  and  obscurity  when  he  published  the  “secrets”  and
techniques  of  magic  in  his  great,  democratic  work  Magick  in  Theory  and
Practice
, published in 1929). Magic has worked for all of the contributors to
this  book,  as  you  will  see,  and  it  can  work  for  everyone.  Personally,  I  don't
need  to  know  HOW  it  works—although  I  have  bucket  loads  of  colorful
theories—just as I don't seem to need to know how my TV works in order to
watch  it,  or  how  a  Jumbo  Jet  stays  up  when  I'm  dozing  through  in-flight
entertainment at 35,000 feet. What I do know for sure, based on the evidence
of my senses and on many years of skeptical enquiry, is that magic allows us
to take control of our own development as human beings. Magic allows us to
see the world entire in a fresh and endlessly significant light and demands of
us  a  vital  and  dynamic  collaboration  with  our  environment.  Magic  brings
coherence  and  structure  to  psychological  “breakdowns,”  psychedelic
experiences  or  transpersonal  encounters.  Magic  allows  us  to  personify  our


background image

fears  and  failures  as  demons  and  outlines  time-honored  methods  of
bargaining with these feelings or banishing them. Magic is the sane response
to  a  world  filled  with  corporate  ghost-gods,  roaming,  mindless  laws  and
peering  surveillance  lenses.  Above  all,  magic  is  about  achieving  results.  It's
about manipulating real-time events, dealing with devious “spirits” and other
autonomous  energy  sources.  It's  about  conjuring  dead  pop  icons  to  do  your
bidding  and  writing  it  all  down  so  that  it  reads  like  an  exciting  adventure
story  and  changes  the  world  around  it.  Magic  is  glamorous,  dark  and
charismatic. “Magic” is the hopelessly inadequate Standard English word for
a long-established technology which permits access to the “operating codes”
underlying  the  current  physical  universe.  Becoming  a  “magician”  is  a
developmental  skill,  like  learning  to  talk,  to  reason,  to  empathize  or  to  see
perspective.

Magic, in short, is Life as it is meant to be Lived by adults.

Disinformation's  Book  of  Lies  is  a  21st  century  grimoire,  a  How  To  book
designed  to  inspire  the  young  magician-warriors  of  this  new  and  turbulent
century. In the apparent derangement of our times, this book is both a call to
arms  and  an  armory  also.  Read  on,  get  tooled  up,  get  out  there...  and  start
bending reality.

And welcome, one and all, to the New Magical Century. 


background image

INTRODUCTION

OPERATION MINDWARP

RICHARD METZGER

“The best place to hide something is right out in the open. No one
ever thinks to look there.”

-Robert Anton Wilson

“Can you teach me how to do a magic trick?”

At first this question used to really flummox me—did they expect me to do
like a card trick? A little sleight of hand perhaps? What did they expect me to
whip out and impress them with? By now I'm used to this line of inquiry and
interestingly,  the  question  is  always  asked  with  complete  sincerity,  never
with  sarcasm  or  scorn,  just  an  open  attitude  to  the  idea  of  “magick.”  In
situations  where  my  reputation  has  preceded  me,  I  think  this  is  kind  of  fun.
I've  even  come  to  enjoy  this  question,  as  it  sure  beats  making  normal  small
talk.

So the first time I ever jerked off, it was to a picture of a butt-
naked  Maxine  Sanders,  Queen  of  the  Witches.  I  think  this
explains a lot about me, actually...

But to answer the question, well, yes, I can teach you how to do a magick, uh,
trick  that  will  most  assuredly  bring  you  dependable  results  (within  reason)
and  I  can  likely  explain  it  to  you  within  10  minutes  time.  If  you  did  what  I
told  you,  things  would  start  happening,  but  before  you  go  feeling  all
impressed  with  yourself,  if  you'd  ask  someone  to  teach  you  a  song  on  the
piano  in  10  minutes,  they  could  do  so,  but  you'd  still  only  be  playing
“Chopsticks.”

Just to put that into perspective...

For  some  reason,  I  have  always  considered  myself  to  be  a  warlock.  Even
when  I  was  very  young.  I  don't  know  why,  really,  but  it  is  true.  I  have  had


background image

this  self-identity  for  as  long  as  I  can  recall.  There  was  never  a  time  when  I
didn't feel this way. I don't remember how I gravitated towards magick in the
first place, but when I was a little kid I really loved Bewitched.  These  were
people who I could relate to and all the comics I liked had heroes who were
sorcerers  and  warlocks:  Dr.  Strange,  Adam  Warlock,  and  Captain  Marvel.

1

My  parents  even  have  a  Super8  film  of  me  dressed  in  a  “wizard”  costume
replete with cloak and Merlin cap, reading my “grimoire” and “scrying” into
a  makeshift  crystal  ball  that  doubled  as  a  funky  early  ’70s  ashtray.  I  was
about five years old when this was shot. Thirty some years later I look back
on  this  and  laugh  at  how  consistent  I  have  been.  The  older  I  get  the  more  I
see a fairly straight trajectory from there to here. It's weird to contemplate it.

One strong shove in the direction of magick might have something to do with
a book called WitchcraftMagic and the Supernatural, a full color hardback
picture book that came out in the 1970s with a bloody goat head on the front
cover  and  an  Austin  Spare  painting  of  a  demon  on  the  back.  Since  the
audience for such a book was undoubtedly on the young side, this book—like
many  such  occult  tomes  published  by  Octopus  Books—had  several  pictures
of  foxy  “sky-clad”  witches  nestled  within  its  pages  to  attract  more  horny
young  buyers.  I  convinced  my  mother  to  purchase  this  book  for  me  at  the
mall. I smiled sweetly, such a good little boy.

So the first time I ever jerked off, it was to a picture of a butt-naked Maxine
Sanders, Queen of the Witches.

I think this explains a lot about me, actually...

When I was younger and first starting to read up on the occult, I was always
puzzled  why  it  all  seemed  to  be  so  “ancient”—I'd  read  book  after  book
looking for something to latch onto, but little of it had much relevance to my
life  and  my  interests.  Latin  incantations,  wands,  daggers,  robes  and  the
various occult “props” all seemed pointless to me and very ineffectual ways
of making magick happen. I'd read about purification rituals, “casting circle,”
the “Mass” of this or that, “hand fasting” and all of this stuff that magicians
were supposed to do, but where was the sorcery? When does it get to the part
where  it  explains  how  to  make  shit  happen?  That's  the  part  that  I  was
interested in and it was the only part I was ever interested in. Forget about all
this hokey Dungeons and Dragons robe-wearing nonsense, I wanted results.

I  recall  watching  Kenneth  Anger's  films  for  the  first  time  and  grasping


background image

intuitively  how  his  films  were  ritual  on  celluloid,  constructed  with  magical
efficacy foremost in mind. Color, music, pacing and especially his choice of
actors (such as Anais Nin, Marjorie Cameron, Marianne Faithful and others)
who  he  viewed  as  “elementals,”  all  figured  into  making  Anger's  cinematic
spells so potent and brilliant. There was also the angle of how, because they
existed on film and could be screened over and over again all over the world,
they  were  incantations  of  especial  power.  I  was  awestruck  by  what  I  was
seeing and I learned a great lesson about “making” magick through a careful
study of Anger's work and through this influence, in part, I continued to move
towards  combining  my  career  ambitions  of  working  in  film,  television  and
publishing with my private magical interests.

Magick—defined  by  Aleister  Crowley  as  “the  art  and  science  of  causing
change in conformity with will”—has always been the vital core of all of the
projects  we  undertake  at  The  Disinformation  Company.  Whether  via  our
website,  publishing  activities  or  our  TV  series,  the  idea  of  being  able  to
“influence”  reality  in  some  beneficial  way  is  what  drives  our  activities.  I've
always  considered  The  Disinformation  Company  Ltd.  and  our  various
activities  to  constitute  a  very  complex  spell.  Some  sorcerers  use  painting  or
music  or  fiction  to  work  their  magick,  but  I  quite  like  the  idea  of  having  a
“magick  business”—both  literally  and  figuratively—as  the  canvas  that  I
perform my magick on. It works on a lot of levels, metaphorically speaking,
for me to consider myself to be a magical businessman, if you see what I am
saying. It's a fairly unfettered way to see your place in the world and doesn't
exactly limit your imagination.

I'm sure Willy Wonka would agree.

Well, it works for me, at least.

“All Cretes are liars” - Epimenides the Crete, inventor of the paradox.

For  this  anthology  I've—quite  obviously—cribbed  the  title  from  Crowley's
cryptic  1913  book  of  the  same  name.  I  liked  the  irony  and  it  dovetailing  so
neatly  with  the  Disinformation  brand  (“Disinformation,”  a  term  usually
associated  with  the  CIA,  means  “a  mixture  of  truth  and  lies”  used  as  an
information  smokescreen),  so  Book  of  Lies  seemed  a  natural.  A  book  that
announces  itself  as  a  book  of  lies  would  have  to  have  the  truth  hidden
somewhere in it, right?

2

 Also, since Crowley looms so large over my way of

thinking,  it's  fitting  to  pay  tribute.  Again  and  again  during  the  preparations


background image

for  this  volume,  I've  looked  over  copies  of  his  occult  journal,  The  Equinox,
and I am conscious that this collection and its sequels follow in its tradition.
Here, I'm interested most of all in presenting “modern” magick as opposed to
“museum” magick and feel that all too often the occult books being published
today are merely a rehash of what has gone on before with nary an ounce of
new energy or new ideas coming into the fold. Not since the innovations of
Chaos Magick in the ’80s has anyone really come along with a go at trying to
redefine  magick  for  the  modern  era  and  offer  a  working  toolkit.  This  is  my
attempt, my version.

And if it is your first dip into occult literature, I do hope this
book  is  like  having  a  nuclear  bomb  go  off  behind  your
eyeballs or a razorblade slashed across your brain.

However, because this book is an anthology—the work of many people—and
showcases  so  many  radical  belief  systems,  rebel  biographies  and  “alt
histories,” I get to elegantly sidestep the notion that I, personally, am trying
to tell anyone “THIS is how you should practice magick” as this is certainly
not my intention. No one can do that for you and I would not presume to try.
How  can  anyone  possibly  know  more  about  your  magick  than  you  do?  It's
about what works for you. If you get results, then it must be working. Over
time  you'll  see  your  targets  hit  with  greater  accuracy,  but  there  is  NO  SET
WAY  OF  DOING  ANYTHING  IN  MAGICK.  I  can  assure  you  that  I,  too,
am making it all up as I go along. Even as my aim gets better and better as I
get older and become more creative with my spell casting, I will say it again:
I am still improvising. This book endeavors to showcase strategies that work
for other people and create a cookbook for subversion, but feel free to riff on
the recipes.

3

 It's the only way forward, to discover your own true orbit in life

and  what  works  for  you.  The  editorial  selection  attempts  to  broaden  the
cultural definition of what magick is—and what it is not—by including many
disparate  voices,  some  not  normally  viewed  as  working  in  the  occult  arena
(painters,  rock  stars,  comic  book  writers,  computer  programmers).  Some  of
the names in the book will be familiar, others not, but the communal reason
that  they  all  coexist  between  the  covers  of  Disinformation's  Book  of  Lies  is
because they are doing something different and inspiring, bringing to light an
obscure subject or else they are writing on a familiar topic and presenting a
side  of  things  not  usually  seen.  This  collection  represents,  for  me,  the
strongest line up of magical thought that I could find today and presents some


background image

of the most potent magical thinkers of our time in its pages.

When you are in the book publishing business, at a certain point—hopefully
early on—you need to ask yourself “Who is going to read this book? Who is
it  for?”  This  anthology  is  for  the  person  who  is  like  I  was  back  then:
searching for something, groping for something magical in their lives, but not
quite  finding  it  in  the  rehashed  medievalism  and  ‘incense  and  affirmations’
school of what passes for occult literature. This book intends to fuel a certain
kind of fire in a certain type of person. I know that I'd be happy if I stumbled
upon it, so I consider that a good sign.

And  if  it  is  your  first  dip  into  occult  literature,  I  do  hope  this  book  is  like
having  a  nuclear  bomb  go  off  behind  your  eyeballs  or  a  razorblade  slashed
across your brain.

I think these ideas deserve a wider readership.

It's  only  when  these  sorts  of  thought  forms  can  be  fully  externalized  in  the
culture that we can expect to see the emergence of a mutant race. I am very
interested in seeing this happen and this collection represents a nudge in that
direction.

Which side are you on? 

Editor's  Note:  The  essays  herein  were  culled  from  a  variety  of  places;
excerpts from both new and out of print books, the Internet, old magazines
I'd  been  keeping  for  years  not  knowing  when  they  might  come  in  handy
and several new pieces appearing here for the first time. I should probably
mention that none of the writers are indicating with their involvement that
they agree with or approve of the work of any other author also appearing
in the book. This is not the case and for the most part, few of them had any
idea whose work their writing might be sitting alongside.

Endnotes:

1

 The “cosmic” ‘70s Captain Marvel written by Jim Starlin, not “Shazam.” I

hated him.

2

 See Crowley's Liber B vel Magi for more on this topic.


background image

3

 Listen to John Coltrane's A Love Supreme and hear the way this man

prayed with his saxophone. Beatific emotion pours out of his horn. You can
see a similar thing in The Mystery of Picasso film, watching him paint.
Incredible. This is magick in action, but these skills were not developed
overnight. You can't escape putting the work in.

Special  thanks  go  out  to  Michael  Moynihan  for  his  kind  help  and
editorial  suggestions  and  Genesis  Breyer  P-Orridge  for  providing
us  with  all  of  the  amazing  Burroughs  and  Gysin  images  from  his
personal  collection  as  well  as  always  being  an  inspiration  to  me
since I was a teenager. It's very gratifying that he has always been
so  supportive  to  my  various  projects.  Thanks  also  to  Grant
Morrison,  and  Kristan  Anderson,  to  Tomo  Makiura,  Paul  Pollard
and Kate Bingaman for the design and layout of this book, Nimrod
Erez, Bradley Novicoff, Mogg Morgan at Mandrake of Oxford, Ben
Meyers  at  Autonomedia,  Nicholas  Tharcher  at  New  Falcon
Publications,  Eric  Simonoff,  Gerry  Howard,  Philip  Gwyn  Jones,
Mark McCarthy, Eva Wisten, Peter H. Gilmore, Douglas Walla at
Kent  Gallery,  Kirsten  Anderson  at  Roq  la  Rue  Gallery,  Fiona
Horne,  Dean  Chamberlain  and  Stacy  Valis,  Jon  Graham  and
Cynthia  Fowles  of  Inner  Traditions,  Brian  Butler,  Mike  Backes,
Shann  Dornhecker,  Greg  Bishop,  Ina  Howard,  Katherine  Gates,
Erik  Pauser,  Leen  Al-Bassam,  Ralph  Bernardo,  Russ  Kick,  Lee
Hoffman,  Alex  Burns,  Naomi  Nelson  and  my  business  partner  in
Disinformation,  Gary  Baddeley,  for  all  of  his  help  with  this
manuscript
.


background image

MAGICK IN THEORY AND PRACTICE


background image

POP MAGIC!

GRANT MORRISON

POP  MAGIC!  is  Magic!  For  the  People.  Pop  Magic!  is  Naked  Magic!  Pop
Magic! lifts the 7 veils and shows you the tits of the Infinite.

THINKING ABOUT IT

All you need to begin the practice of magic is concentration, imagination and
the ability to laugh at yourself and learn from mistakes. Some people like to
dress up as Egyptians or monks to get themselves in the mood; others wear
animal  masks  or  Barbarella  costumes.  The  use  of  ritual  paraphernalia
functions as an aid to the imagination only.

Anything  you  can  imagine,  anything  you  can  symbolize,  can  be  made  to
produce magical changes in your environment.

FIRST STEPS ON THE PATH

Magic  is  easy  to  do.  Dozens  of  rulebooks  and  instruction  manuals  are
available  in  the  occult  or  “mind,  body  and  spirit”  sections  of  most  modern
bookstores.  Many  of  the  older  manuals  were  written  during  times  when  a
powerful  and  vindictive  Church  apparatus  was  attempting  to  suppress  all
roads  to  the  truth  but  most  of  them  are  generally  so  heavily  coded  and
disguised  behind  arcane  symbol  systems  that  it's  hardly  worth  the  bother—
except  for  an  idea  of  how  other  people  used  THEIR  imaginative  powers  to
interpret non-ordinary contacts and communications.

Aleister  Crowley—magic's  Picasso—wrote  this  and  I  can't  say  it  any  better
than he did:

“In  this  book  it  is  spoken  of  the  sephiroth  and  the  paths,  of  spirits  and
conjurations,  of  gods,  spheres,  and  planes  and  many  other  things  which
may or may not exist. It is immaterial whether they exist or not. By doing
certain  things,  certain  results  follow;  students  are  most  earnestly  warned


background image

against  attributing  objective  reality  or  philosophical  validity  to  any  of
them.”

This  is  the  most  important  rule  of  all  which  is  why  it's  here  at  the  start.  As
you  continue  to  learn  and  develop  your  own  psychocosms  and  styles  of
magical  practice,  as  you  encounter  stranger  and  stranger  denizens  of  the
Hellworlds  and  Hyperworlds,  you'll  come  back  to  these  words  of  wisdom
again and again with a fresh understanding each time.

HOW TO BE A MAGICIAN

Simple. Declare yourself a magician, behave like a magician, practice magic
every day.

Be honest about your progress, your successes and failures. Tripping on 500
mushrooms might loosen your astral sphincter a little but it will not generally
confer upon you any of the benefits of the magic I'm discussing here. Magic
is  about  what  you  bring  BACK  from  the  Shining  Realms  of  the
Uberconscious. The magician dives into the Immense Other in search of tips
and hints and treasures s/he can bring home to enrich life in the solid world.
And if necessary, Fake it till you make it.

Declare yourself a magician, behave like a magician, practice
magic every day.

HOW TO BE A MAGICIAN 2

Read  lots  of  books  on  the  subject  to  get  in  the  mood.  Talking  about  magic
with non-magicians is like talking to virgins about shagging. Reading about
magic is like reading about sex; it will get you horny for the real thing but it
won't give you nearly as much fun.

Reading will give you a feel for what's crap and what can usefully be adapted
to  your  own  style.  Develop  discrimination.  Don't  buy  into  cults,  aliens,
paranoia, or complacency. Learn whom to trust and whom to steer clear of.

HOW TO BE A MAGICIAN 3

Put down the books, stop making excuses and START.


background image

MAGICAL CONSCIOUSNESS

Magical consciousness is a particular way of seeing and interacting with the
real  world.  I  experience  it  as  what  I  can  only  describe  as  a  “head-click,”  a
feeling of absolute certainty accompanying a perceptual shift which gives real
world  transactions  the  numinous,  uncanny  feeling  of  dreams.  Magical
consciousness  is  a  way  of  experiencing  and  participating  with  the  local
environment  in  a  heightened,  significant  manner,  similar  to  the  effects  of
some  drug  trips,  Salvador  Dali's  “Paranoiac/critical”  method,  near  death
experiences,  etc.  Many  apparently  precognitive  and  telepathic  latencies
become  more  active  during  periods  of  magical  consciousness.  This  is  the
state in which tea leaves are read, curses are cast, goals are scored, poems are
written.

Magical  Consciousness  can  be  practiced  until  it  merges  with  and  becomes
everyday  consciousness.  Maintained  at  these  levels  it  could  interfere  with
your  lifestyle  unless  you  have  one  which  supports  long  periods  of  richly
associative thought.

EXPERIMENT:

As  a  first  exercise  in  magical  consciousness  spend  five  minutes  looking  at
everything around you as if ALL OF IT was trying to tell you something very
important.  How  did  that  light  bulb  come  to  be  here  exactly?  Why  does  the
murder  victim  in  the  newspaper  have  the  same  unusual  surname  as  your
father-in-law?  Why  did  the  phone  ring,  just  at  that  moment  and  what  were
you thinking when it did? What's that water stain on the wall of the building
opposite? How does it make you feel?

Five  minutes  of  focus  during  which  everything  is  significant,  everything  is
luminous and heavy with meaning, like the objects seen in dreams.

Go.

EXPERIMENT:

Next,  relax,  go  for  a  walk  and  interpret  everything  you  see  on  the  way  as  a
message  from  the  Infinite  to  you.  Watch  for  patterns  in  the  flight  of  birds.
Make  oracular  sentences  from  the  letters  on  car  number  plates.  Look  at  the
way buildings move against the skyline. Pay attention to noises on the streets,


background image

graffiti  sigils,  voices  cut  into  rapid,  almost  subliminal  commands  and  pleas.
Listen between the lines. Walk as far and for as long as you feel comfortable
in  this  open  state.  The  more  aimless,  the  more  you  walk  for  the  pleasure  of
pure  experience,  the  further  into  magical  consciousness  you  will  be
immersed.

Reading about magic is like reading about sex; it will get you
horny for the real thing but it won't give you nearly as much
fun.

Magical  consciousness  resembles  states  of  light  meditation,  “hypnagogic”
pre-sleep trance or alpha wave brain activity.

APPLIED MAGIC

Is about making things happen and performing the necessary experiments. In
these  endeavors  we  do  not  need  to  know  HOW  magic  works,  only  that  it
does. We prove this by doing the work, recording the results and sharing our
information with other magicians. Theoretical magic is all the mad ideas you
come  up  with  to  explain  what's  happening  to  you.  Applied  magic  is  what
makes them happen.

THE MAGICAL RECORD

Always keep a journal of your experiments. It's easy to forget things you've
done  or  to  miss  interesting  little  connections  and  correspondences.  Make  a
note  of  everything,  from  the  intent  to  the  fulfillment.  Make  a  note  of  dates,
times, moods, successes and failures.

Study  YOURSELF  the  way  a  hunter  studies  prey.  Exploit  your  own
weaknesses to create desired changes within yourself.

BANISHING

Banishing  is  a  way  of  preparing  a  space  for  ritual  use.  There  are  many
elaborate  banishing  rituals  available,  ranging  across  the  full  spectrum  of
pomposity. Think of banishing as the installation of virus protection software.
The banishing is a kind of vaccination against infection from Beyond.

Most banishings are intended to surround the magician with an impenetrable
shield  of  will.  This  usually  takes  the  form  of  an  acknowledgment  of  the


background image

elemental  powers  at  the  four  cardinal  points  of  the  compass.  Some  like  to
visualize themselves surrounded and protected by columns of light or by four
angels.  Any  protective  image  will  do—spaceships,  superheroes,  warrior-
monks,  whatever.  I  don't  bother  with  any  of  that  and  usually  visualize  a
bubble  radiating  outwards  from  my  body  into  space  all  around  above  and
below me as far as I think I'll need it.

Why the need for protection?

Remember  that  you  may  be  opening  some  part  of  yourself  to  an  influx  of
information from “non-ordinary,” apparently “Other” sources. If you practice
ceremonial  magic  and  attempt  to  summon  godforms  or  spirits  things  will
undoubtedly  happen.  Your  foundations  will  be  tested.  There  is  always  the
danger  of  obsession  and  madness.  As  magical  work  progresses,  you  will  be
forced into confrontation with your deepest darkest fears and desires. It's easy
to become scared, paranoid and stupid. Stay fluid, cling to no one self-image
and maintain your sense of humor at all times. Genuine laughter is the most
effective banishing ritual available.

Study  YOURSELF  the  way  a  hunter  studies  prey.  Exploit
your  own  weaknesses  to  create  desired  changes  within
yourself.

Banishing reminds you that no matter how many gods you talk to, no matter
how many fluorescent realms you visit, you still have to come home, take a
shit,  be  able  to  cook  dinner,  water  the  plants  and,  most  importantly,  talk  to
people without scaring them.

When you complete any magical work, ground yourself with a good laugh, a
good  meal,  good  shag,  a  run  or  anything  else  that  connects  you  with  the
mundane world. Banishing after your ritual is over works as a decompression
back  into  the  normal  world  of  bills  and  bus  stops  and  job  satisfaction.  The
magician's  job  is  not  to  get  lost  in  the  Otherworld  but  to  bring  back  its
treasures for everyone to play with.

SIGILS

In  the  Pop  Magic!  style,  the  sigil  (sij-ill)  is  the  first  and  one  of  the  most
effective of all the weapons in the arsenal of any modern magician.

The sigil technique was reconceptualized and modernized by Austin Osman


background image

Spare  in  the  early  20th  century  and  popularized  by  Chaos  Magicians  and
Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth in the 19 hundred and 80s.

A sigil is a magically charged symbol like this one:

The sigil takes a magical desire or intent—let's say “IT IS MY DESIRE TO
BE  A  GREAT  ACTOR”  (you  can,  of  course,  put  any  desire  you  want  in
there) and folds it down, creating a highly-charged symbol. The desire is then
forgotten. Only the symbol remains and can then be charged to full potency
when the magician chooses.

Forgetting  the  desire  in  its  verbal  form  can  be  difficult  if  you've  started  too
ambitiously. There's no point charging a sigil to win the lottery if you don't
buy a ticket. Start with stuff that's not too emotionally involving.

I  usually  sigilize  to  meet  people  I'm  interested  in,  or  for  particular  qualities
I'll need in a given situation. I've also used sigils for healing, for locating lost
objects  and  for  mass  global  change.  I've  been  using  them  for  20  years  and
they ALWAYS work. For me, the period between launching the sigil and its
manifestation  as  a  real  world  event  is  usually  3  days,  3  weeks  or  3  months
depending on the variables involved.

I repeat: sigils ALWAYS work.

So.  Begin  your  desire's  transformation  into  pure  throbbing  symbol  in  the
following fashion: First remove the vowels and the repeating letters to leave a
string of consonants—TSMYDRBGC.

Now  start  squashing  the  string  down,  throwing  out  or  combining  lines  and
playing  with  the  letters  until  only  an  appropriately  witchy-looking  glyph  is
left.  When  you're  satisfied  it's  done,  you  may  wind  up  with  something  like
this:


background image

Most  homemade  sigils  look  a  little  spooky  or  alien—like  UFO  writing  or
witchy wall-scratchings. There are no rules as to how your sigil should look
as long as it WORKS for you. RESULTS ONLY are important at this stage.
If something doesn't work, try something else. The point is not to BELIEVE
in magic, the point is to DO it and see how it works. This is not religion and
blind faith plays no part.

Charging and launching your sigil is the fun part (it's often advisable to make
up  a  bunch  of  sigils  and  charge  them  up  later  when  you've  forgotten  what
they originally represented).

Now,  most  of  us  find  it  difficult  at  first  to  maintain  the  precise  Zen-like
concentration necessary to work large-scale magic. This concentration can be
learned  with  time  and  effort  but  in  the  meantime,  sigils  make  it  easy  to
sidestep  years  of  training  and  achieve  instant  success.  To  charge  your  sigil
you  must  concentrate  on  its  shape,  and  hold  that  form  in  your  mind  as  you
evacuate all other thoughts.

Almost  impossible,  you  might  say,  but  the  human  body  has  various
mechanisms  for  inducing  brief  “no-mind”  states.  Fasting,  spinning,  intense
exhaustion, fear, sex, the fight-or-flight response; all will do the trick. I have
charged  sigils  while  bungee  jumping,  lying  dying  in  a  hospital  bed,
experiencing  a  total  solar  eclipse  and  dancing  to  Techno.  All  of  these
methods  proved  to  be  highly  effective  but  for  the  eager  beginner  nothing
beats the WANK TECHNIQUE.

Some non-magicians, I've noticed, convulse with nervous laughter whenever
I mention the word “masturbation” (and no wonder; next to wetting the bed
or shitting in your own cat's box for a laugh, it's the one thing no-one likes to


background image

admit to).

Be  that  as  it  may,  magical  masturbation  is  actually  more  fun  and  equally,
more serious, than the secular hand shandy, and all it requires is this: at the
moment  of  orgasm,  you  must  see  the  image  of  your  chosen  sigil  blazing
before  the  eyes  in  your  mind  and  project  it  outwards  into  the  ethereal
mediaspheres  and  logoverses  where  desires  swarm  and  condense  into  flesh.
The sigil can be written on paper, on your hand or your chest, on the forehead
of a lover or wherever you think it will be most effective.

At the white-hot instant of orgasm, consciousness blinks. Into this blink, this
abyssal crack in perception, a sigil can be launched.

Masturbation  is  only  ONE  of  countless  methods  you  can  use  to  bring  your
mental chatter to a standstill for the split-second it takes to charge and launch
a  sigil.  I  suggest  masturbation  because  I'm  kindhearted,  because  it's
convenient and because it's fun for most of us.

However...one  does  not  change  the  universe  simply  by  masturbating  (tell
THAT  to  the  millions  of  sperm  fighting  for  their  life  and  the  future  of  the
species in a balled up Kleenex). If that were true, every vague fantasy we had
in our heads at the moment of orgasm would come true within months. Intent
is what makes the difference here.

Forget  the  wanking  for  just  one  moment  if  you  can  and  remember  that  the
sigil is the important part of the magic being performed here. The moment of
orgasm  will  clear  your  mind,  that's  all.  There  are  numerous  other  ways  to
clear  your  mind  and  you  can  use  any  of  them.  Dancing  or  spinning  to
exhaustion  is  very  effective.  Meditation  is  effective  but  takes  years  to  learn
properly.  Fear  and  shock  are  very  good  for  charging  sigils,  so  you  could
probably watch a scary movie and launch your sigil at the bit where the hero's
head comes bouncing down the aluminum stepladder into his girlfriend's lap.
A run around the block clutching a sigil might be enough to charge it, so why
not experiment?

At  the  moment  of  orgasm,  you  must  see  the  image  of  your
chosen sigil blazing before the eyes in your mind and project
it  outwards  into  the  ethereal  mediaspheres  and  logoverses
where desires swarm and condense into flesh.

Try  launching  your  sigil  while  performing  a  Bungee  jump  from  a  bridge,


background image

perhaps, or sit naked in your local graveyard at night. Or dance until you fall
over. The important thing is to find your own best method for stopping that
inner chat just long enough to launch a fiercely visualized, flaming ultraviolet
sigil  into  the  gap.  States  of  exhaustion  following  ANY  intense  arousal  or
deprivation are ideal.

The  McDonald's  Golden  Arches,  the  Nike  swoosh  and  the
Virgin autograph are all corporate viral sigils.

And if you experiment and still have trouble with sigils, try some of the other
beginner  exercises  for  a  while.  I've  met  a  couple  of  people  who've  told  me
they  can't  make  sigils  work  so  maybe  there  are  a  few  of  you  out  there  who
genuinely  have  problems  in  this  particular  area.  Tough  luck  but  it  doesn't
mean  there's  no  magic  for  you  to  play  with.  I  couldn't  wheeze  “Twinkle
twinkle little star...” out of a clarinet but I can play the guitar well enough to
have written hundreds of fabulous songs. If I'd stuck with the clarinet and got
nowhere  would  that  mean  there  is  no  such  thing  as  music?  Or  would  it
indicate  simply  that  I  have  an  aptitude  for  playing  the  guitar  which  I  can't
seem  to  replicate  using  a  clarinet?  If  I  want  to  make  music  I  use  the
instrument I'm most comfortable and accomplished with. The same is true for
magical  practice.  Don't  get  uptight  about  it.  This  is  not  about  defending  a
belief system, this is about producing results.

USE ONLY WHAT WORKS.

SIGILS: DISPOSAL

Some  people  keep  their  sigils,  some  dispose  of  them  in  an  element
appropriate to the magician's intent (I have burned, buried, flushed away and
scattered sigils to the winds, depending on how I felt about them. Love-sigils
went  to  water—flushed  down  the  toilet  or  thrown  into  rivers  or  boiled  in
kettles.  War-sigils  were  burned  etc....  Some  of  my  sigils  are  still  around
because I decided they were slow-burners and worth keeping. Some are even
still in print. Do what feels right and produces results.)

Soiled paper and tissues can easily be disposed of in your mum's purse or the
pocket of dad's raincoat.

VIRAL SIGILS


background image

The  viral  sigil  also  known  as  the  BRAND  or  LOGO  is  not  of  recent
development (see “Christianity,” “the Nazis” and any flag of any nation) but
has  become  an  inescapable  global  phenomenon  in  recent  years.  It's  easy  to
see  the  Nazi  movement  as  the  last  gasp  of  Imperial  Age  thinking;  these
visionary  savages  still  thought  world  domination  meant  tramping  over  the
“enemy” and seizing his real estate. If only they'd had the foresight to see that
global  domination  has  nothing  to  do  with  turf  and  everything  to  do  with
media
  they  would  have  anticipated  corporate  stealth-violence  methods  and
combined  them  with  their  undoubted  design  sense;  the  rejected  artists  who
engineered the Third Reich might have created the 20th century's first global
superbrand  and  spared  the  lives  of  many  potential  consumers.  The
McDonald's  Golden  Arches,  the  Nike  swoosh  and  the  Virgin  autograph  are
all corporate viral sigils.

Corporate  sigils  are  super-breeders.  They  attack  unbranded  imaginative
space. They invade Red Square, they infest the cranky streets of Tibet, they
etch  themselves  into  hair-styles.  They  breed  across  clothing,  turning  people
into  advertising  hoardings.  They  are  a  very  powerful  development  in  the
history of sigil magic, which dates back to the first bison drawn on the first
cave wall.

The logo or brand, like any sigil, is a condensation, a compressed, symbolic
summing up of the world of desire which the corporation intends to represent.
The logo is the only visible sign of the corporate intelligence seething behind
it. Walt Disney died long ago but his sigil, that familiar, cartoonish signature,
persists, carrying its own vast weight of meanings, associations, nostalgia and
significance.  People  are  born  and  grow  up  to  become  Disney  executives,
mouthing the jargon and the credo of a living corporate entity. Walt Disney
the man is long dead and frozen (or so folk myth would have it) but Disney,
the immense, invisible corporate egregore persists.

Corporate  entities  are  worth  studying  and  can  teach  the  observant  magician
much about what we really mean when we use the word “magic.” They and
other ghosts like them rule our world of the early 21st century.

EXPERIMENT:

Think  hard  about  why  the  Coca-Cola  spirit  is  stronger  than  the  Dr.  Pepper
spirit  (what  great  complex  of  ideas,  longings  and  deficiencies  has  the  Coke


background image

logo  succeeded  in  condensing  into  two  words,  two  colors,  taking  Orwell's
1984 concept of Newspeak to its logical conclusion?). Watch the habits of the
world's  great  corporate  predators  like  FOX,  MICROSOFT  or  AOL  TIME
WARNER.  Track  their  movements  over  time,  observe  their  feeding  habits
and  methods  of  predation,  monitor  their  repeated  behaviors  and  note  how
they  react  to  change  and  novelty.  Learn  how  to  imitate  them,  steal  their
successful  strategies  and  use  them  as  your  own.  Form  your  own  limited
company  or  corporation.  It's  fairly  easy  to  do  with  some  paperwork  and  a
small amount of money. Create your own brand, your own logo and see how
quickly you can make it spread and interact with other corporate entities.

Build your own god and set it loose.

HYPERSIGILS

The “hypersigil” or “supersigil” develops the sigil concept beyond the static
image  and  incorporates  elements  such  as  characterization,  drama  and  plot.
The  hypersigil  is  a  sigil  extended  through  the  fourth  dimension.  My  own
comic book series The Invisibles was a six-year long sigil in the form of an
occult  adventure  story  which  consumed  and  recreated  my  life  during  the
period  of  its  composition  and  execution.  The  hypersigil  is  an  immensely
powerful  and  sometimes  dangerous  method  for  actually  altering  reality  in
accordance with intent. Results can be remarkable and shocking.

EXPERIMENT:

After  becoming  familiar  with  the  traditional  sigil  method,  see  if  you  can
create  your  own  hypersigil.  The  hypersigil  can  take  the  form  of  a  poem,  a
story, a song, a dance or any other extended artistic activity you wish to try.
This  is  a  newly  developed  technology  so  the  parameters  remain  to  be
explored.  It  is  important  to  become  utterly  absorbed  in  the  hypersigil  as  it
unfolds;  this  requires  a  high  degree  of  absorption  and  concentration  (which
can  lead  to  obsession  but  so  what?  You  can  always  banish  at  the  end)  like
most  works  of  art.  The  hypersigil  is  a  dynamic  miniature  model  of  the
magician's  universe,  a  hologram,  microcosm  or  “voodoo  doll”  which  can
manipulated in real time to produce changes in the macrocosmic environment
of “real” life.


background image

FROM POP MAGIC!

PART 2

HOW TO CHAT UP GODS

Accept this for the moment; there are Big Ideas in the world. They were Big
before  we  were  born  and  they'll  still  be  big  long  after  we're  moldering.
ANGER  is  one  of  those  Big  Ideas  and  LOVE  is  another  one.  Then  there's
FEAR or GUILT

So...to  summon  a  god,  one  has  only  to  concentrate  on  that  god  to  the
exclusion of all other thought. Let's just say you wish to summon the Big Idea
COMMUNICATION  in  the  form  of  the  god  Hermes,  so  that  he  will  grant
you a silver-tongue. Hermes is the Greek personification of quick wit, art and
spelling and the qualities he represents were embodied by Classical artists in
the  symbol  of  an  eternally  swift  and  naked  youth,  fledged  with  tiny  wings
and dressed only in streamers of air. Hermes is a condensation into pictorial
form—a  sigil,  in  fact—of  an  easily  recognizable  default  state  of  human
consciousness.  When  our  words  and  minds  are  nimble,  when  we  conjure
laughter  from  others,  when  we  make  poetry,  we  are  in  the  real  presence  of
Hermes. We are, in fact, possessed by the god.

I  am  not  suggesting  that  there  is  a  real  or  even  a  ghostly,  Platonic  Mount
Olympus  where  Hollywood  deities  sit  around  a  magic  pool  watching  the
affairs  of  mortals  and  pausing  only  to  leap  down  whenever  one  of  us
“believes”  in  them  hard  enough.  There  may  well  be  for  all  I  know  but  it
seems a complicated way to explain something quite simple. The truth is that
there doesn't HAVE to be a Mount Olympus for you to encounter Hermes or
something  just  like  him  using  a  different  name.  You  don't  even  have  to
“believe” in Greek gods to summon any number of them. Hermes personifies
a Big Idea and all you have to do is think him fervently and he'll appear so
hard and so fast in your mind that you will know him instantly.

People  tend  to  become  possessed  by  gods  arbitrarily  because  they  do  not
recognize  them  as  such;  a  man  can  be  overwhelmed  with  anger  (the  Greek
god Ares), we can all be “beside ourselves” with passion (Aphrodite) or grief
(Hades). In life we encounter these Big Ideas every day but we no longer use
the  word  “god”  to  describe  them.  The  magician  consciously  evokes  these
states and renames them gods in order to separate them from his or her Self,


background image

in order to study them and learn.

You may wish to connect with Hermes if you're beginning a novel or giving a
speech or simply want to entertain a new beau with your incredible repartee.

HOW MANY HERMES?

The  form  the  Big  Idea  takes  depends  upon  your  tradition  or  desire.  The
beautiful  electric  youth  of  the  Greeks  is  a  well-known  image  in  Western
cultures,  having  been  appropriated  for  everything  from  Golden  Age  FLASH
comics  to  the  logo  of  the  INTERFLORA  chain  of  florists.  Other  cultures
personify speed, wit and illusion slightly differently but the basic complex of
ideas remains the same worldwide: velocity, words, writing, magic, trickery,
cleverness, are all the qualities we would associate with Hermes, but in India
this  Big  Idea  is  embodied  not  as  a  tin-hatted  swift  runner  but  as  a  plump
youth  with  an  elephant  head  and  a  broken  tusk  with  which  he  writes  the
ongoing  story  of  the  universe.  This  is  Ganesh,  the  scribe  of  the  Hindu
pantheon.

In Egypt, the same Big Idea is called Thoth, who created the symbols on the
Tarot deck. In the Icelandic tradition, Odin or Wotan is the Lord of Lightning
and  communications.  (Like  the  VDUs  we  stare  at  every  day,  Wotan  is  one-
eyed and on his shoulders sit the ravens Thought and Memory who bring him
instantaneous data from around the world. He can be very handy in this form,
if you need to discipline an unruly PC).

Hermes,  Mercury,  Odin,  Ganesh,  Thoth;  all  these  names  represent  variant
embodiments on themes of Communication and speed.

Reductionists  may  come  to  an  understanding  of  magic  by  considering
“Mount Olympus” as a metaphor for the collective Human head.

EXPERIMENT:

Pick  a  traditional  god  or  demon  from  a  book  on  magic  or  mythology  and
learn all you can about your chosen subject. I suggest you start with a benign
deity  unless  you're  stupid  or  hard  and  want  to  get  into  some  nasty  dirty
psychic  business,  in  which  case  pick  a  demon  from  one  of  the  medieval
grimoires  and  hope  you're  strong  enough  to  handle  the  intense  negative
feelings “demons” embody.


background image

However,  I'd  suggest  starting  first  with  Hermes,  the  god  of  Magic,  in  his
guise as Ganesh. Ganesh is known as a smasher of obstacles and part of his
complex is that he opens the way into the magical world, so it's always good
to get his acquaintance first if you're serious about following a magical path.

Call fervently upon Hermes. Luxuriate in his attributes. Drink coffee or Red
Bull  in  his  name  or  take  a  line  of  speed,  depending  on  your  levels  of  drug
abuse.  Fill  your  head  with  speedy  images  of  jet  planes,  jet  cars  and  bullet
trains.  Play  “Ray  of  Light”  by  Madonna  and  call  down  Hermes.  Surround
yourself with FLASH comics and call down Hermes.

Tell him how very wonderful he is in your own words, and then call him into
yourself,  building  a  bridge  between  your  own  ever-growing  feelings  of
brilliance and the descending energies of the Big Idea.

The arrival of the god will be unmistakable: you should experience a sense of
presence  or  even  mild  possession  (remember  what  this  MEANS;  we  are
“possessed” by Venus when LOVE destroys our reason. We are all possessed
by  Mars  when  ANGER  blinds  us.  Learn  to  recognize  the  specific  feelings
which  the  word  “possession”  describes.  This  will  allow  you  to  study  your
chosen Big Idea and its effects on the human nervous system at close quarters
without becoming too frightened or emotionally overwhelmed.)

You  may  hear  a  distinct  voice  inside  your  head  which  seems  to  have  a
strange-yet-familiar  quality  of  “Otherness”  or  separateness.  Ask  questions
and make note of the replies in your head. Remember anything specific you
hear and write it down no matter how strange it seems. Maintain the sense of
contact,  question  and  response  for  as  long  as  you're  able  and  see  what  you
can learn.

Remember Hermes is a trickster also and has a love of language and games,
so  be  prepared  for  clever  wordplay  and  riddles  when  you  contact  this  Big
Idea.  Sometimes  the  rapid  torrent  of  puns  and  jokes  can  seem  like  a
nightmare  of  fractal  iterations  but  if  you're  going  to  play  with  Hermes,  be
ready to think fast and impress with your wit.

If, on the other hand, there's only a faint hint of unearthly presence or none at
all, don't worry. Try again with Ganesh, Odin or a god you feel more in tune
with. Keep doing the experiment until you succeed in generating the required
state  of  mind.  It's  not  difficult;  if  you  can  make  yourself  Angry  or  Sad  or


background image

Happy  just  by  thinking  about  something  (and  most  of  us  can),  then  you  are
already capable of summoning gods and Big Ideas.

DEMONS ARE...

No more, no less than the way you feel inside after you've been dumped by a
beloved  or  exposed  by  one's  peers  as  a  freak  or  any  of  the  other  negative
value defaults we have access to as human beings. Hell is ONLY the Cringe
Eternal  and  the  Place  of  Our  Self's  Undoing.  When  Nietzsche  proclaimed
“God is dead!” he forgot to add that Satan is also dead and we are Free from
all that antique tat.

EXPERIMENT:

Use the techniques you've learned to summon classical gods and demons and
apply  them  to  beings  you  KNOW  for  sure  can't  be  real,  like  Jack  Kirby's
comic  book  gods,  H.  P  Lovecraft's  Cthulhu  Mythos  monsters,  Pokemon
characters, or Clive Barker's Cenobites. You will discover that you can evoke
any  of  these  outlandish  characters  to  physical  appearance.  In  place  of
Hermes, the messenger god, it's possible to summon the same complex in a
quite  different  cultural  drag—I  advise  at  least  one  invocation  of  the  speedy
mercurial  force  of  Hermes  in  the  form  of  Metron,  the  computer-like
intellectual  explorer  from  Jack  Kirby's  New  Gods  comic  books.  I've  had  a
great  deal  of  success  contacting  the  Kirby  Gods,  including  a  memorable
encounter with the Big Idea of Righteous Anger in its aspect as “Orion” on
the  endless,  cosmic  battlefields  of  the  Fourth  World.  Summon  warrior
strength  and  martial  energy  in  the  form  of  Orion  by  surrounding  yourself
with images from Kirby comics, by playing “Mars” from the “Planets Suite”
or  the  Beatles  “Revolution  #9”  or  simply  the  sounds  of  gunfire  and  bombs
from a special effects record.

Summon James Bond before a date by playing the themes to Goldfinger and
Thunderball while dressing in a tuxedo.

Or try summoning Dionysus, god of creative delirium, in his Trickster aspect,
as Ace Ventura, Pet Detective from the Jim Carrey films—surround yourself
with  your  own  pets  or  toy  animals,  play  the  movies,  imitate  the  actor's
distinctive  moves  and  use  them  to  formulate  a  physical  sigil  which  you  can
enact  within  in  your  designated  ritual  space.  Do  this  until  you  BECOME


background image

Dionysus  as  Ace  Ventura.  Record  what  happens  to  your  sense  of  self  and
think of ways to use these new “godlike” qualities you have summoned into
yourself  (or  brought  forth  from  your  “subconscious”  depending  on  which
model you choose to explain your experiences).

Think  of  these  new  qualities  or  gods  as  applications  and  upload  them  when
you need to use them. The more you run the application the more convincing
and intrinsic to Self it seems to become. This is why actors sometimes find it
difficult to “come down” from roles and why magicians often feel possessed
by gods or demons. Applications are being run.

You  will  soon  realize  that  gods  are  “qualities”  or  default  states  of
consciousness available to everyone.

With  much  practice  you  will  become  proficient  at  accessing  these  states  in
yourself.  Do  not,  however,  assume  that  these  states  are  ONLY  internal
psychological processes. The Big Ideas have been here long before you and
will  be  here  long  after  you  are  gone.  They  can  be  regarded  as  immensely
powerful autonomous qualities and should be respected as such. Summoning
too  much  ANGER  into  your  life  can  make  you  a  bore  and  a  bully,
summoning too much COMMUNICATION at the expense of other qualities
can make you a conversation-hogging pedant and so on.

There is always danger when one “god” is worshipped in favor of all others.
If you summon Ace Ventura you may find yourself becoming not funny and
creative but annoying. If you summon Clive Barker's fictional Cenobites just
to see whether or not I'm punting absolute nonsense, be prepared to deal with
powerful  issues  of  domination,  torture,  submission  and  pain  for  these  value
states define the operational parameters of Cenobites.

Summon James Bond before a date by playing the themes to
Goldfinger
 and Thunderball while dressing in a tuxedo.

HEALING

My  preferred  method  for  healing  is  the  Spiritualist  “laying  on  of  hands”
technique which involves a simple homemade prayer to the congregation of
dead  “healers”  or  “veterinarians”  who  inhabit  the  “the  other  side”  and  are
said to be willing to help us in times of need. This prayer is accompanied by
intense  concentration  and  visualization  of  the  healing  process.  I've  always


background image

found it works very well and can be most effective in conjunction with sigils.

EXPERIMENT:

Visit  your  local  Spiritualist  Church,  if  you  have  one,  and  ask  to  see  a
demonstration of this powerful healing method.

DUDE, WHERE'S MY EGO?

The  “ego”—in  the  negative  sense—is  that  ossified  sense  of  a  stable,
unchanging “self” which people use as a defense against the Fear of Change
and  Death.  It's  SELF  as  a  suit  of  armor;  protective  and  comforting  at  times
SELF doesn't allow much room to maneuver, make effective contact or adapt
to new situations. Otherwise, the Ego, with a big “E” can be a useful tool like
everything  else  lying  around  here.  Ego  creates  the  heroic  drive  towards  the
Transcendence  which  CONSUMES  AND  RESOLVES  that  drive  into  a
higher context.

It  must  be  remembered  that  you  can't  go  beyond  your  ego  until  you've
developed  one  to  go  beyond.  The  ego,  as  Individual  Self,  is  scaffolding  for
what we can call super-self or the memeplex (to use Susan Blackmore's term
for what we call “personality” —see The Meme Machine (Oxford University
Press,  May  2000)  for  more  on  Dr.  Blackmore's  revolutionary  theory).
Scaffolding  is  a  necessary  part  of  any  construction  project  but  for  the  last
couple of hundred years we've been encouraged to mistake the scaffolding for
the  building.  The  individual  sovereign  self  once  seemed  such  a
developmental  prize  that  it's  now  very  difficult  to  let  go  of  it  without
incurring  amusing  existential  extinction  traumas,  but  like  all  other  stages  of
growth it IS just a stage and must be surpassed.

Demoting  the  concept  of  the  “individual”  by  deliberately  engineering
multiple,  conferring  “egos,”  personae,  memeplexes  or  selves  is  intended,  at
least by me, as a method of breaking up the existential, calcified, individual
“Self”  into  more  fluid  Multiple  Personality  constellations,  by  exposing  “the
personality” as just one behavioral option from a menu of many.

THE ABYSS

Aleister  Crowley  embodied  the  destruction  of  Egoic  Self  structures  as
Choronzon,  the  Devil  333.  Choronzon,  we  are  told,  is  the  all-devouring


background image

guardian of “the Abyss” (The Abyss being a suitably dramatic and evocative
term  for  an  experiential  “gap”  in  human  consciousness.)  The  term  can  be
applied  to  that  state  of  mind  during  which  Individual  Egoic  Self-
consciousness  begins  to  cannibalize  itself  rather  than  confront  the  usually
frightening  fact  that  Personality  is  not  “real”  in  the  existential  sense  and  is
simply a behavioral strategy.

Most  of  us  have  had  some  small  experience  of  the  gigantic  boundary
complex  Mega-ChoronzonnoznorohC-ageM;  the  Choronzonic  Encounter  is
present  in  the  relentless,  dull  self-interrogation  of  amphetamine  comedowns
or fevers, near-death experiences. Think of the chattering mind, annihilating
itself  in  unstoppable  self-examination  and  you  will  hear  the  voice  of
Choronzon.

Choronzon  then,  is  Existential  Self  at  the  last  gasp,  munching  out  its  own
brains, seeking nourishment and finding only the riddle of the Bottom That Is
Bottomless. Choronzon is when there is nothing left but to die to nothingness.
Beyond  Choronzon,  concepts  of  personality  and  identity  cannot  survive.
Beyond Choronzon we are no longer our Self. The “personality” on the brink
of  the  Abyss  will  do  anything,  say  anything  and  find  any  excuse  to  avoid
taking this disintegrating step into “non-being.”

Choronzon  is  when  there  is  nothing  left  but  to  die  to
nothingness.  Beyond  Choronzon,  concepts  of  personality  and
identity cannot survive. Beyond Choronzon we are no longer
our Self.

Most of us in the increasingly popular Western Consumerist traditions tend to
wait  until  we  die  before  even  considering  Choronzon.  Since  we  can  only
assume that Egoic Self-sense is devoured whole in whatever blaze of guilt or
fury or self-denial or peace perfect peace our last flood of endorphins allows
in the 5 minutes before brain death, the moment of death seems to me to be a
particularly vulnerable one in which to also have to face Existential terror for
the first time.

Better to go there early and scout out the scenery. To die before dying is one
of the great Ordeals of the magical path.

The  Abyss,  then,  is  that  limit  of  Self  consciousness  where  meaning
surrenders and reverses into its own absolute opposite and is there consumed


background image

in “Choronzonic Acid,” a hypersolvent so powerful it dissolves the SelfitSelf.
Here  you  will  encounter  the  immense  SELF/NOT  SELF  boundary  wall  on
the edge of Egoic Consciousness and be obliterated against it. The Abyss is a
hiatus  in  awareness,  where  notions  of  identity,  race,  being  and  territory  are
consumed in an agonizing fury of contradiction.

Magicians  who  have  successfully  “crossed”  the  Abyss  are  considered  no
longer  human,  in  the  sense  that  survival  of  this  ordeal  necessitates  the
breaking down of SELF into multiple personality complexes.

EXPERIMENT:

The  so-called  “Oath  of  the  Abyss,”  is  a  corrosive  encounter  with
Choronzonic  forces  inside  the  personality.  It  is  not  something  to  be
undertaken  lightly  and  I'd  suggest  many  years  of  magical  practice  before
attempting anything as stupid and as glamorous as destroying your carefully-
established  SELF.  The  rewards  of  a  successful  crossing  of  the  Abyss  are
many but a failed attempt can leave the magician broken inside, consumed by
doubt, fear and insecurity and quite useless to his or her community...

REVOLT INTO MAGIC!

Becoming  a  magician  is  in  itself  a  revolutionary  act  with  far-reaching
consequences.  Before  you  set  out  to  destroy  “the  System,”  however,  first
remember that we made it and in our own interests. We sustain it constantly,
either in agreement, with our support, or in opposition with our dissent. The
opponents  of  the  System  are  as  much  a  function  of  the  System  as  its
defenders.  The  System  is  a  ghost  assembled  in  the  minds  of  human  beings
operating within “the System.” It is a virtual parent we made to look after us.
We  made  it  very  big  and  difficult  to  see  in  its  entirety  and  we  serve  it  and
nourish it every day. Are there ever any years when no doctors or policemen
are born? Why do artists rarely want to become policemen?

For  every  McDonald's  you  blow  up,  “they”  will  build  two.
Instead  of  slapping  a  wad  of  Semtex  between  the  Happy
Meals  and  the  plastic  tray,  work  your  way  up  through  the
ranks, take over the board of Directors and turn the company
into an international laughing stock.

For  every  McDonald's  you  blow  up,  “they”  will  build  two.  Instead  of


background image

slapping  a  wad  of  Semtex  between  the  Happy  Meals  and  the  plastic  tray,
work  your  way  up  through  the  ranks,  take  over  the  board  of  Directors  and
turn the company into an international laughing stock. You will learn a great
deal  about  magic  on  the  way.  Then  move  on  to  take  out  Disney,  Nintendo,
anyone  you  fancy.  What  if  “The  System”  isn't  our  enemy  after  all?  What  if
instead  it's  our  playground?  The  natural  environments  into  which  we  pop
magicians  are  born?  Our  jungle,  ocean  and  ice  floe...to  bargain  with  and
dance around and transform, as best we can, into poetry?

What if, indeed? 


background image

THE EXECUTABLE DREAMTIME

MARK PESCE

Being Imbolc, the  Illumination of all  things Hidden and  Occult, the  holiday
of  Bride,  who  brings  the  Light  of  Knowledge  to  all  those  who  humbly  ask
Her Grace to dispel Darkness, it is Meet and Proper to discuss Such Things as
may  lead  to  a  Broader  Understanding  of  the  Relation  between  Word  and
Will. Once Requested, Thrice Granted. So mote it be!

WORD AND WILL

I pitied thee,

Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour

One thing or other: when thou didst not, savage,

Know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like

A thing most brutish, I endow'd thy purposes

With words that made them known.

-The Tempest, Act I, Scene 2

A  recent  issue  of  New  Scientist  celebrated  William  S.  Burroughs'  most
famous maxim: “Language is a virus.” It seems that language, our ability to
apprehend  and  manipulate  symbols  and  signs,  has  evolved  to  fill  a  unique
ecological  niche—the  space  between  our  ears.  Human  beings,  together  with
most  higher  animals,  share  an  ability  to  sequence  perceptual  phenomena
temporally,  detecting  the  difference  between  before,  during,  and  after.  This
capability is particularly pronounced in the primates, and, in the case of homo
sapiens
, left us uniquely susceptible to an infection of sorts, an appropriation
of our innate cognitive abilities for ends beyond those determined by nature
alone. Our linguistic abilities aren't innate. They are not encoded in our DNA.
Language is more like E. coli, the bacteria in our gut, symbiotically helping
us to digest our food. Language helps us to digest phenomena, allowing us to
ruminate on the nature of the world.

Why  language  at  all?  We  are  fairly  certain  that  it  confers  evolutionary


background image

advantage,  that  a  species  which  speaks  (and  occasionally,  listens)  is  more
likely  to  pass  its  genes  on  than  a  species  which  cannot  speak.  But  we  can't
make too much of that: nearly all other animals are dumb, to varying degrees,
and  they  manage  to  be  fruitful  and  multiply  without  having  to  talk  about  it.
Despite the fact that gorillas can sign and dolphins squeak, we haven't found
any  indication  of  the  symbol-rich  internal  consciousness  which  we  attribute
to  language.  This  means  that  other  animals  have  a  direct  experience  of  the
world around them, while everything we do is utterly infused with the fog of
language.

We  need  to  be  clear  about  this:  from  the  time,  some  tens  or  hundreds  of
thousands of years ago, that language invaded and colonized our cerebrums,
we  have  increasingly  lost  touch  with  the  reality  of  things.  Reality  has  been
replaced  with  relation,  a  mapping  of  things-as-they-are  to  things-as-we-
believe-them-to-be.
  Language  allows  us  to  construct  complex  systems  of
symbols,  the  linear  narratives  which  frame  our  experience.  Yet  a  frame
invariably occults more of the world than it encompasses, and this exclusion
leaves us separated from the world-as-it-is.

It  is  impossible  for  a  human  being,  in  a  “normal”  level  of  consciousness—
that  is,  without  explicit  training  or  “gratuitous  grace”—to  experience
anything  of  the  reality  of  the  world.  Language  steps  in  to  mediate,  explain,
and  define.  The  moments  of  ineffability  are  outside  the  bounds  of  human
culture  (if  not  entirely  outside  human  experience)  because  at  these  points
where language fails nothing can be known or said. This alone should tell us
that while we think ourselves the masters of language, precisely the opposite
is true. Language is the master of us, a tyranny from which no escape can be
imagined.

This is not a new idea. The second line of the Tao Te Ching states the matter
precisely:  “The  name  which  can  be  named  is  not  the  true  name.”  In  the
origins  of  human  philosophy  and  metaphysics,  language  stands  out  as  the
great Interloper, separating man from the apprehension of things-as-they-are.
Zen practice aims to extinguish the internal monologue, seeking a unification,
a boundary dissolution between the internal state of mankind, encompassed at
every point by the boundaries inherent in language, and the Absolute. This is
the  universal,  yet  entirely  individual  battle  of  mankind,  the  great  liberation
earnestly  sought  for.  Yet,  at  the  end,  nothing  is  gained.  And  this  seems
reward  enough,  because  the  “mind  forg'd  manacles”  which  bind  us  to  the


background image

world of words so hinder the progress of the soul that any release, even into
Nothing, is a movement upward.

It  is  not  as  though  all  of  us  are  imminently  bound  for  Nirvana;  white  some
will  stop  the  Wheel  of  Karma,  the  rest  will  remain  thoroughly  entangled  in
the attachments of desire, hypnotically attracted to the veil of Maya. That veil
is made of language; it is the seductive voice, the Siren's Call, which keeps us
from our final destiny. This is bad, in that attachments produce suffering, but
it  is  also  good,  a  point  rarely  promoted  by  the  devotees  of  utmost
annihilation.  Being  in  the  world  means  being  at  play  within  the  world.
Without  play  there  is  no  learning,  without  learning,  no  progress  to  the
inevitable  release.  And  in  the  play  of  the  world,  as  in  any  game,  there  are
winners and losers: there are those who skin their knees or break their bones,
but  at  the  end,  everything  returns  to  potentialities,  and  only  the  memory  of
having  played  the  game  remains.  All  of  our  interactions  within  the  world
leave  their  mark  upon  us,  and  we  wage  war  within  ourselves:  we  would  be
both naked, unadorned, and as completely transformed as the Illustrated Man,
whose entire body, covered in tattoos, tells the story of his life.

In the battle between Word and Will, there are two paths, which diverge from
a  common  entry  point,  and  converge  upon  a  final  exit.  We  wish  to  release
everything  and  become  one  with  all;  we  wish  to  encompass  everything  and
become one with all. If you desire to remove yourself from the world, there
are numerous sources, starting with Lao Tze and Buddha, who can steer you
in the direction of emptiness. But if you decide this is too much (or rather, too
little
) to ask, there is another path. I find the emptiness of the Absolute a bit
too chilling, the light from Ain Soph too revealing; not because they represent
the highest, but rather, because they simplify the manifold beauty. “The Tao
produces  one,  one  produces  two,  the  two  produce  the  three  and  the  three
produce all things.” To choose the Tao over the many things which flow from
it is to assert a hierarchy of values, a violation of the very essence of the Tao.
We  are  that  river;  we  flow  from  that  source.  Why  do  we  feel  the  need  to
return?

“Language  is  a  virus.”  While  we  think  ourselves  the  masters
of  language,  precisely  the  opposite  is  true.  Language  is  the
master  of  us,  a  tyranny  from  which  no  escape  can  be
imagined.


background image

As an answer to the demands of eternal return, the French philosophers have
introduced  us  to  the  idea  of  forward  acceleration.  When  you  find  yourself
trapped  in  a  seemingly  hopeless  situation,  jam  your  foot  down  on  the
accelerator  petal,  take  it  to  the  limit,  and  drive  straight  on  through  to  the
culmination. Imminentize the Eschaton. What if we were to say, fine, bring it
on
, and accept language for all of its enslaving faults—but, at the same time,
keep a consciousness  of these faults  constantly before us?  Where would we
find ourselves? Could this lead to freedom, a freedom which is less an escape
from imprisonment than an encompassing awareness that the world, with all
of its traps and cages, cannot be separated from the Absolute? In any case, a
recognition  of  the  “horror  of  the  situation”—as  Gurdjieff  stated  it—could
only put us in a better place to plot our escape. When you find yourself in the
belly of the Beast, why not curl up, make yourself comfortable, and conspire?
That  most  concisely  describes  where  we  are  today,  in  an  instantaneously
connected,  universally  mediated  linguistic  environment  of  human  creation.
But  before  we  conspire  in  any  sense  of  safety,  we  must  consider  how
language  shapes  the  relations  between  human  beings.  Otherwise  we  risk
exchanging the illness of linguistic infection for the cunning traps of human
power.

RHETORIC AND REASON

Good friends, sweet friends, let me not stir you up

To such a sudden flood of mutiny.

They that have done this deed are honorable:

What private griefs they have, alas, I know not,

That made them do it: they are wise and honorable,

And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you.

-Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene 2

A  few  weeks  before  I  wrote  this  essay,  I  had  a  private  conversation  with  a
neurophysiologist at UCSD (University of California San Diego), who passed
along  some  stunning  insights  he'd  gathered  from  his  research  on  the  human
brain.  It  seems  that  although  we  like  to  perceive  ourselves  as  rational,
reasonable creatures, carefully weighing our decisions before we commit, the
fact of the matter is precisely the inverse. We arrive at our decisions through


background image

emotional sensations, acting “from the gut” at all times. Our reason enters the
process  only  after  the  decision  has  been  made,  and  acts  as  the  mind's
propagandist, convincing us of the utter rightness which underlies all of our
actions. Beyond this, reason has a social function: to convince others that our
actions are correct. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears! Not so
that  you  can  think  for  yourselves,  but  that  I  might  instruct  you  in  what  to
believe.

Thus  are  all  the  great  philosophies  of  Socrates  and  Plato  overturned;  these
men,  considering  themselves  the  paragons  of  reason,  used  their  rhetorical
skills to create a new tradition in thought which had nothing more behind it
than the force of the words which composed it. Seen in this light, the entirety
of  human  history  becomes  more  farcical  (and  more  tragic)  than  could
possibly be imagined. Right and wrong, good and evil, these carefully argued
positions  are  foundations  built  upon  the  shifting  sands  of  words.  The
linguistic  infection  has  left  us  weakened,  vulnerable  to  a  secondary,  and
perhaps more serious illness—conviction.

Humans  are  faced  with  a  dual-headed  problem;  it  is  bad  enough  that  the
world as-we-know-it is made of words, mediated by language, and still worse
that  this  means  that  other  human  beings  can  employ  this  condition  (more
precisely, conditioning) for their own ends. It likely could not be otherwise,
for  we  are  social  beings;  that  much  is  encoded  into  our  DNA  and  our
physiology.  We  need  for  people  to  believe  in  us,  to  support  us,  to  conspire
with  us.  A  human  being  unwillingly  deprived  of  the  society  of  his  peers
descends into madness as the fine structures of perceived reality, maintained
and reinforced by the rhetorical bombardments of others' truths (and his own,
reflected  back),  rapidly  unwind  without  constant  reinforcement.  What  I  tell
you three times is true. What I tell you three million times is civilization.

Plato  knew  this:  that's  why  he  banned  poets  from  his  Republic.  What  he
could  not  (or,  more  sinisterly,  would  not)  recognize  is  that  all  words  are
poetry,  rhetoric  regimenting  the  reason.  To  speak  and  be  heard  means  that
you  are  sending  your  will  out  onto  the  world  around  you,  changing  the
definition of reality for all those who hear you. We do this from the time we
learn to speak (imagine the two year-old asserting his will in a shrill cry for
attention, and noting a corresponding change in the behavior of those around
him) till the moment we breathe our last. For most people, most of the time,
this is an unconscious process, automatic and mechanical. For a few others,


background image

who, by accident or training, have become conscious of the power of reason
to change men's minds, a choice is presented: how do you use this power?

We  arrive  at  our  decisions  through  emotional  sensations,
acting  “from  the  gut”  at  all  times.  Our  reason  enters  the
process only after the decision has been made, and acts as the
mind's  propagandist,  convincing  us  of  the  utter  rightness
which underlies all of our actions.

“We are all pan-dimensional wizards, casting arcane spells with every word
we speak. And every spell we speak always comes true.” Owen Rowley, my
mentor in both the magical mysteries and in the mysteries of virtual reality,
taught  me  this  maxim  some  years  ago,  though  it  took  some  years  before  I
began  to  understand  the  full  magnitude  of  his  seemingly  grandiose
pronouncement.  More  than  anything  else,  it  places  enormous  responsibility
on  anyone  who  uses  language—that  is,  all  of  us.  Because  we  are  creatures
infected by language, and because language shapes how we come to interpret
reality, we bear the burden of our words. We know that words can hurt, we
even believe that words can kill, but the truth is far more comprehensive: all
of our words are the equivalent of a hypnotist's suggestions, and all of us are
to  some  degree  susceptible.  With  this  responsibility  comes  an  awareness  of
the burden we bear. It is how we encounter this burden—as individuals and
as a civilization—which shapes reality.

If  power  corrupts,  and  each  of  us  are  endowed  with  inestimable  power,  we
could  cast  human  civilization  as  a  long  war  of  words,  a  battle  to  determine
what  is  real.  Robert  Anton  Wilson  once  quipped,  “Reality  is  the  line  where
rival  gangs  of  shamans  fought  to  a  standstill.”  This  statement  hides  the  fact
that  we're  all  shamans,  and  every  time  we  say,  “This  is  this,”  we  reset  the
parameters of the real. Most of these shamanic battles are relatively innocent,
just  primate  teeth-baring  and  jockeying  for  dominance  in  a  given  situation.
However,  in  the  wrong  mouths,  words  can  lead  to  disaster.  Consider  Jim
Jones  or  Adolph  Hitler,  who,  by  force  of  their  oratory,  led  hundreds  and
millions to their deaths.

If, instead, an individual conscious of the power of words to shape the world
chooses to use this power with wisdom, seeking not hegemony but liberation
—a  different  path  opens  up.  In  this  world,  nothing  needs  to  be  true,  and
everything  becomes  permissible.  This  is  the  realm  of  conscious  magick,


background image

where the realized power of the word opens possibilities for the self without
constricting  the  potentialities  of  anyone  else.  This  is  the  safest  path,  both
karmically  and  practically;  if  you  stay  out  of  the  way  of  others,  there's  less
likelihood  you'll  be  interfered  with  yourself.  The  magician  does  not
proselytize;  and  although  he  may  present  an  irresolvable  paradox  for  those
who confront his magick with their own linguistically reinforced perceptions
of  the  world,  he  bares  no  responsibility  for  their  reactions,  nor  is  he
susceptible  to  their  attacks.  He  exists  in  a  world  apart,  because  there  is  no
agreement on a common language through which a linguistic infection could
spread.  The  magician  insulates  himself,  inoculates  himself  and  protects
himself  from  the  beliefs  of  others,  while  holding  his  own  beliefs  in  great
suspicion.  Rhetoric  and  anti-rhetoric,  combined,  produces  a  burst  of  energy
which  propels  the  magician  forward,  with  great  acceleration,  into  a  new
universe of meaning.

The products of power sometime pose too great a temptation to the magician;
we have the warning tale of Faust to remind us that although the mastery of
the  linguistic  nature  of  the  world  confers  great  power  over  others,  its  use
inevitably leads to destruction. The magician needs a higher consciousness—
in  the  Sufic  sense—before  he  can  toy  with  the  wheels  and  dials  of  such
power.  This  is  why  many  magical  orders  will  not  initiate  candidates  before
they  have  reached  a  certain  age,  or  have  demonstrated  a  material
responsibility  which  can  form  a  foundation  from  which  right  action  can
proceed.  To  ignore  such  prohibitions  is  to  court  disaster,  and  the  checkered
history  of  magical  orders  in  the  19th  and  20th  centuries  shows  that  far  too
often, ignorance has been the order of the day. Only when the magician puts
down  his  power  over  others  does  he  achieve  any  realizable  power  over
himself.  You  are  your  own  High  Priest,  and  no  one  else's.  From  this
everything else follows.

When the magician has arrived at this point in his path, matters of education
and  technique  become  paramount.  It  is  very  rare  when  an  individual  is
granted  sufficient  gratuitous  grace  to  travel  on  the  path  to  wisdom  entirely
alone.  The  teacher  or  mentor  reveals  the  mysteries  to  the  initiate,  but  the
teacher  must  be  aware  of  how  much  the  initiate  can  bear  safely,  doling  out
knowledge  as  one  might  dispense  a  powerful  tonic  which  is  also  a  poison.
The  right  dosage  can  do  great  good;  too  much  will  kill.  For  this  reason  the
Sufis  believe  that  only  within  a  “School”  governed  by  a  teacher  with


background image

sufficient wisdom, can the initiate pass through the gates of wisdom.

Robert Anton Wilson once quipped, “Reality is the line where
rival  gangs  of  shamans  fought  to  a  standstill.”  In  the  wrong
mouths,  words  can  lead  to  disaster.  Consider  Jim  Jones  or
Adolph  Hitler,  who,  by  force  of  their  oratory,  led  hundreds
and millions to their deaths.

Consider for a moment the case of John Lilly, a modern magician, who used
sensory deprivation in combination with LSD-25 in a search for wisdom. He
had enormous successes to begin with: Programming and Metaprogramming
in  the  Human  Biocomputer
  is  one  of  the  most  effective  magical  texts  ever
published, useful for the magician throughout his training. Yet this could not
keep Lilly from becoming a life-long ketamine addict, which finally left him
hollowed-out and lifeless (in consensus reality), as he chose to remain in the
Valley of Illusions. This is an individual choice, of course, and Lilly had his
reasons  (or  rather,  his  emotions)  for  choosing  this  course  for  his  life.  But
Lilly deprived himself of the opportunity for further advancement on the path
of  knowledge,  becoming  trapped  within  a  world  of  chemical  fantasy.  His
intense forward acceleration led only to a cul-de-sac, a dead-end from which
he would never escape.

If  such  a  luminary  as  John  Lilly  cannot  safely  pass  through  the  gates  of
wisdom,  what  hope  can  be  given  to  the  aspiring  magician,  one  who  has
become  conscious  of  the  power  of  the  word  to  shape  the  world,  but  has  no
understanding of how to actualize that knowledge? We are fortunate to live in
an age when all the teachings of all the ages are more or less freely available,
a  time  when  all  the  mysteries  have  been  revealed.  But  the  mysteries
themselves are not enough. A community is necessary, a conspiracy of like-
minded  souls  set  on  the  same  path,  speaking  the  right  words,  words  which
reinforce  the  integrity  of  the  self,  allowing  the  magician  to  learn  wisdom
through  a  series  of  initiations  (whether  explicit  or  implicit),  growing,  like  a
child, into adulthood.

These  schools  do  exist,  and  it  is  possible  for  the  aspiring  magician  to  find
them without too much difficulty. Even so, a certain skepticism is necessary;
“By  their  fruits  you  will  know  them,”  and  although  the  teacher  may  seem
overtly  stern,  or  authoritarian,  it  remains  up  to  the  candidate  to  prepare  his
vessel,  ready  to  receive  illumination.  Even  the  most  profane  masters  can  be


background image

vehicles  for  the  illumination  of  their  students—provided  the  students  are
properly  prepared.  The  student  must  remain  conscious,  vigilant,  and  never
allow the master to use linguistic traps to assign the real; that's the difference
between a School and a cult.

WORD AND WORLD

Now my charms are all o'erthrown,

And what strength I have's mine own,

Which is most faint: now, 'tis true,

I must be here confined by you,

Or sent to Naples. Let me not,

Since I have my dukedom got

And pardon'd the deceiver, dwell

In this bare island by your spell;

But release me from my bands

With the help of your good hands.

-The Tempest, Act V, Epilogue

We  have  by  now  told  but  half  the  story.  Our  linguistic  capabilities,  as
employed by our reason, act upon each other to create reality. Yet beyond the
reality-in-our-heads  there  is  an  exterior  world  (let's  admit  that,  lest  we  be
accused  of  nothing  but  solipsism  and  word  play),  which  we  are  about  to
actualize  as  an  exteriorization  of  our  linguistic  capabilities.  The  world
presents two faces to us; the natural, that is, that which arose by itself; and the
artificial;  that  which  is  the  product  of  man's  interactions  within  the  world.
While  both  the  natural  and  artificial  are  clouded  with  the  omnipresent
linguistic fog, only the artificial world is the product of our linguistic nature.
Artifacts are language concretized and exteriorized. Technology is a language
of sorts, in which the forms of the world are shaped by our words, and then
speak back to us. We have been throwing technological innovations into the
world  since  we  discovered  fire  (at  least  a  half  million  years  ago),  and  since
that time the technological world, the world of artifact, has been talking back.
The  history  of  humanity,  viewed  in  this  way,  can  be  seen  as  a  continuous
process  of  feedback:  as  we  talk  to  the  world,  through  our  hands,  the  world


background image

accepts  these  innovations,  which  modify  the  environment  within  which  we
participate, which modifies our own understanding of the world, which leads
to new innovations, which modifies the environment, which modifies us, and
so  on,  and  so  on.  This  isn't  causality,  or  just  a  circling  Oroborus;  this  is  a
process,  an  epigenetic  evolution,  in  which  language  continuously  assumes  a
more concrete form. We are learning to talk to the hand, or rather, our hands
are learning to speak, and are endowing the world of artifacts with the same
linguistic infections that have so completely colonized our own biology.

This is a lot to assert, and a lot to absorb, but it is possible to approach this
thesis  from  another  point  of  entry,  the  idea  of  code.  The  word  “code”  has
numerous meanings; it means one thing to a geneticist, another to a computer
programmer,  another  to  a  cryptographer.  Yet  the  underlying  meaning  is
remarkably  similar,  because  there  is  a  growing  sense  in  the  scientific  and
technical communities that when all of the specifics are stripped away, when
the very essence of the universe is revealed, it is naught but code. And what
is code, precisely? Language. Whether the stepping-stairs of the amino acid
base pairs which comprise the genome, or the sequence of logical steps in a
computer  program,  or  the  mathematical  translations  which  can  either  occult
or  reveal  a  message,  code  is  a  temporal  organization  of  symbols—first...
next... last—which establish the basis for both operation and understanding.

The  idea  of  the  universe  as  code  has  gained  great  currency  from
mathematician Stephen Wolfram's A New Kind of Science  (Wolfram  Media,
Inc.,  2002)  which  posits  that  the  processes  observable  in  the  universe  more
often obey computational rules than algebraic formulae. He goes on to state
that  an  enormous  number  of  disparate  processes  we  see  in  nature—the
expansion  of  space-time,  quantum  interconnectedness,  and  the  growth  of
biological forms—all have their basis in the fact that the universe acts as an
entity which is constantly processing codes, executing programs, engaging in
an  execution  of  reality.  Wolfram  has  been  trained  both  as  a  physicist  and  a
computer  programmer;  his  background  in  both  disciplines  makes  him
uniquely  qualified  to  identify  the  common  ground  that  lies  between  these
seemingly entirely distinct fields.

“Any  sufficiently  advanced  technology  is  indistinguishable
from magic.”

The  ground  seems  to  be  rising  to  meet  Wolfram.  While  biologists  discover


background image

the  codes  of  nature,  physicists  and  chemists  are  applying  codes  to  nature's
most  basic  structures,  to  produce  atomic-scale  forms  known  as
nanotechnology.  Whether  or  not  we  choose  to  acknowledge  it,  the  arrow  of
the  epigenetic  evolution  of  the  human  species  points  to  a  time  in  the  near
future  when  the  entire  world  will  be  apprehended  as  code.  A  forthcoming
“Theory of Everything” won't be a formula; it will be a program, a series of
linguistic  statements,  which,  like  the  words  in  a  sentence,  describe  the
execution of reality.

Here we come to the heart of the matter, where the individual apprehension
of  the  world  as  linguistically  conceived  becomes  convergent  with  the
increasingly  accepted  scientific  view  of  the  universe  as  a  linguistic  process.
We know that words shape the world as we see it, but now we have come to
understand that words shape the world as it is. There is, at an essential level,
an  isomorphism  between  the  world  of  the  code  between  our  ears  and  the
reality of the code of the universe. The codes we create change our personal
perceptions of the world, but they also change the world around us; the more
we  learn  about  how  to  modify  the  world,  the  more  that  language  becomes
convergent with reality, and the more our will extends over the real. In a real
sense, beyond the narrow vision of the world underneath our skin, words are
colonizing the world.

This  places  the  magician  in  a  unique  historical  position,  or,  rather,  restores
him  to  a  position  which  he  lost  during  the  scientific  revolution.  Newton
began  his  career  as  an  alchemist,  seeking  the  mystical  union  between  man
and nature which would result in the Philosopher's Stone. He did not live to
see the final convergence between the language of magick and the language
of science, but, more and more, science will begin to look like magick, and
magicians like scientists. I don't mean this in the rude sense of Clarke's Law
that “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic,”
but rather, that the principles and techniques underlying these two seemingly
separate  disciplines  are  on  naturally  convergent  courses.  The  magician,
master of the code, will find himself completely at home in a universe which
has  become  linguistically  apprehensible  as  code.  The  scientist  will  find
himself completely at home speaking a language in which his words change
the  world.  With  the  exception  of  those  few  who  pursue  both  disciplines,
neither  will  have  noticed  that  they  have  arrived  at  the  same  point.  The
magician will utter his spells, the scientist will speak his codes, but both will


background image

be saying the same thing.

It will feel to us as though we have come full circle. The ancients of the West
compiled  grimoires,  magical  texts  which  presented  the  lessons  learned  by
generations of practitioners in a series of spells, linguistic incantations which
used the word to shape the will. Aboriginal cultures wove these lessons into
“songlines,”  expressing  the  mythic  narrative  of  culture  as  the  infinite
possibility  beyond  consensus  reality,  a  “dreamtime.”  Now,  knowing  the
ground  for  the  first  time,  we  are  using  our  gifts  with  language—in  genetics
and informatics and chemistry—to speak the word, and make the world. The
idea of code is overflowing, becoming the world itself, and reality will soon
be  as  programmable  as  the  writer's  page,  responding  to  the  will  of  the
magician like some lucid dream. In this executable dreamtime everything is
true, within limits determined by experiment; once those limits are known, a
new generation of magicians will undoubtedly attempt to transcend them.

What will this world look like? We have no precedent in profane history to
use as a guide; we must look further afield, to mythology, to understand the
form  of  a  linguistic  universe.  It  is  the  dreamtime  of  the  Aboriginal
Australians, or the Faeire of the Celts, the absolute expansion of possibilities
—both  angelic  and  demonic—in  that  everything  expressible  can  be  brought
into  being.  The  masters  of  linguistic  intent  in  both  magical  and  scientific
forms (a false distinction) will be masters of word and world. Say the word,
and it will come to pass.

Although this process appears inevitable, it could be that we are bound by the
same “Single Vision and Newton's Sleep” that William Blake prophesied 200
years ago. It could be that the universe is not code, but simply that the idea of
code has overflowed from our brain's linguistic centers into other areas of the
cerebrum,  colonizing  our  reason  and  intellectual  capabilities  as  easily  as  it
captured  our  ability  to  apprehend  sequence.  This  could  all  be  a  chimera,  an
elusive  possibility  which  may  remain  tantalizingly  out  of  reach.  Yet  the
whole world seems to be conspiring to teach us this: In the beginning was the

word. 


background image

THEE SPLINTER TEST

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE

It can be said, for me at least, that sampling, looping and re-assembling both
found materials and site specific sounds selected for precision of relevance to
thee message implications of a piece of music or a transmedia exploration, is
an  alchemical,  even  a  magical  phenomenon.  No  matter  how  short,  or
apparently  unrecognizable  a  “sample”  might  be  in  linear  time  perception,  I
believe  it  must,  inevitably,  contain  within  it  (and  accessible  through  it),  the
sum  total  of  absolutely  everything  its  original  context  represented,
communicated, or touched in any way; on top of this it must implicitly also
include  the  sum  total  of  every  individual  in  any  way  connected  with  its
introduction  and  construction  within  the  original  (host)  culture,  and  every
subsequent (mutated or engineered) culture it in any way, means or form, has
contact with forever (in Past, Present, Future and Quantum time zones).

“Any two particles that have once been in contact will continue to
act  as  though  they  are  informationally  connected  regardless  of
their separation in space and time.”

-Bell's Theorem

Let  us  assume  then  that  every  “thing”  is  interconnected,  interactive,
interfaced  and  intercultural.  Sampling  is  all  ways  experimental,  in  that  thee
potential results are not a given. We are splintering consensual realities to test
their  substance  utilizing  the  tools  of  collision,  collage,  composition,
decomposition,  progression  systems,  “random”  chance,  juxtaposition,  cut-
ups,  hyperdelic  vision  and  any  other  method  available  that  melts  linear
conceptions and reveals holographic webs and fresh spaces. As we travel in
every  direction  simultaneously  the  digital  highways  of  our  Futures,  thee
“Splinter Test” is both a highly creative contemporary channel of conscious
and  creative  “substance”  abuse,  and  a  protection  against  the  restrictive
depletion of our archaic, algebraic, analogic manifestations.

“My  Prophet  is  a  fool  with  his  1,1,1;  are  they  not  the  OX,  and
none by the BOOK?”


background image

-Liber AL 1-48

So,  in  this  sense,  and  bearing  this  in  our  “mind”  on  a  technical  level,  when
we sample, or as we shall prefer to label it in this essay, when we splinter, we
are actually splintering people and brain product freed of any of the implicit
restraints or restrictions of the five dimensions. We are actually taking bytes
and  reusing  these  thereafter  as  hieroglyphs  or  memes—the  tips  of  each
iceberg.

If we shatter, and scatter, a hologram, we will realize that in each fragment,
no  matter  how  small,  large,  or  irregular;  we  will  see  the  whole  hologram.
This is an incredibly significant phenomenon.

It  has  all  ways  been  my  personal  contention  that  if  we  take,  for  example,  a
splinter  of  John  Lennon,  that  splinter  will,  in  a  very  real  manner,  contain
within it everything that John Lennon ever experienced; everything that John
Lennon  ever  said,  composed,  wrote,  drew,  expressed;  everyone  that  ever
knew  John  Lennon  and  the  sum  total  of  all  and  any  of  those  interactions;
everyone  who  ever  heard,  read,  thought  of,  saw,  reacted  to  John  Lennon  or
anything  remotely  connected  with  John  Lennon;  every  past,  present  and/or
future combination of any or all of thee above.

In  magick  this  is  known  as  the  “contagion  theory”  or  phenomenon.  The
magical  observation  of  this  same  phenomenon  would  suggest  that  by
including even a miniscule reference or symbol of John Lennon in a working,
ritual or a sigil (a two or three dimensional product invoking a clear intention
usually  primarily  graphically  and  non-linguistically,  in  a  linear,  everyday
sense)  you  are  invoking  John  Lennonness  as  part  of  what  in  this  particular
context (i.e. music) is a musical sigil.

We  access  every  variable  memory  library  and  every
individual  human  being  who's  ever  for  a  second  connected
with, conceived or related to or been devoted to or despised or
in anyway been exposed to this splinter of culture.

All  that  encyclopedic  information—and  the  time  travel  connected  with  it,
through  memory  and  through  previous  experience—goes  with  that  one
“splinter” of memory, and we should be very aware that it carries with it an
infinite sequence of connections and progressions through time and space. As
far as you may wish to go.


background image

We  can  now  all  maintain  the  ability  to  assemble,  via  these  “splinters,”
clusters of any era. These clusters are basically reminding. They are actually
bypassing  the  usual  consensus  reality  filters  (because  they  reside  in  an
acceptable  form,  i.e.  TV/film/music/words)  and  traveling  directly  into
“historical”  sections  of  the  brain,  triggering  all  and  every  conscious  and
unconscious reverberation to do with that one splinter hieroglyph.

We access every variable memory library and every individual human being
who's  ever  for  a  second  connected  with,  conceived  or  related  to  or  been
devoted to or despised or in anyway been exposed to this splinter of culture.

We now have available to us as a species, really for thee first time in history,
infinite  freedom  to  choose  and  assemble,  and  everything  we  assemble  is  a
portrait of what we are now or what we visualize being.

SKILLFUL SPLINTERING CAN GENERATE

MANIFESTATION.

THIS IS THEE “SPLINTER TEST”

We  are  choosing  splinters  consciously  and  unconsciously  to  represent  our
own mimetic (DNA) patterns, our own cultural imprints and aspirations; we
are in a truly magical sense invoking manifestations, perhaps even results, in
order  to  confound  and  short-circuit  our  perceptions,  and  reliance  of
wholeness.

Anything, in any medium imaginable, from any culture, which is in any way
recorded and can in any possible way be played back is now accessible and
infinitely malleable and useable to any artist.

Everything is available, everything is free, and everything is permitted. It's a
firestorm in a shop sale where everything must go.

The  “edit”  in  video  and  televisual  programming  and  construction  is  in
essence  an  invisible  language  in  the  sense  that  our  brain  reads  a  story  or
narration  in  a  linear  manner,  tending  to  blend,  compose,  and  assemble  as
continuous what it primarily sees at the expense of reading the secondary sets
of intersections and joins that it does not consciously, or independently, see.
Yet the precision of choice in where to edit, and thee specific emotional and
intellectual  impact  and  innate  sense  of  meaning  that  is  thus  specifically
conveyed is as much a text of intent and directed meaning, even propaganda,


background image

as is the screenplay or dialogue itself.

Everything  in  life  is  cut-up.  Our  senses  retrieve  infinite  chaotic  vortices  of
information,  flattening  and  filtering  them  to  a  point  that  enables
commonplace  activity  to  take  place  within  a  specific  cultural  consensus
reality.  Our  brain  encodes  flux,  and  builds  a  mean  average  picture  at  any
given  time.  Editing,  reduction  of  intensity  and  linearity  are  constantly
imposed  upon  the  ineffable  to  facilitate  ease  of  basic  communication  and
survival. What we see, what we hear, what we smell, what we touch, what we
emote,  what  we  utter,  are  all  dulled  and  smoothed  approximations  of  a  far
more intense, vibrant and kaleidoscopic ultra-dimensional actuality.

Those who build, assemble. ASSEMBLY is thee invisible language of our
TIME.  Infinite  choices  of  reality  are  thee  gift  of  “software”  to  our
children.

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX A.]

THEE SCATTERING

“And  they  did  offer  sacrifices  of  their  own  blood,  sometimes  cutting
themselves  around  in  pieces  and  they  left  them  in  this  way  as  a  sign.  Other
times  they  pierced  their  cheeks,  at  others  their  lower  lips.  Sometimes  they
scarified certain parts of their bodies, at others they pierced their tongues in a
slanting direction from side to side and passed bits of straw though thee holes
with horrible suffering; others slit thee superfluous part of their virile member
leaving it as they did their ears.”

A FORMAL PROCESS OF MORAL REASONING

If  history  is  any  clue,  the  succession  of  civilizations  is  accompanied  by
bloodshed,  disasters  and  other  tragedies.  Our  moral  responsibility  is  not  to
stop  a  future,  but  to  shape  it:  To  channel  our  destiny  in  humane  directions,
and  to  try  to  ease  the  trauma  of  transition.  We  are  still  at  the  beginning  of
exploring  our  tiny  little  piece  of  the  omniverse.  We  are  still  scientific,
technological,  and  cyberspace  primitives;  and,  as  we  revolutionize  science
itself,  expanding  its  perimeters,  we  will  put  mechanistic  science—which  is
highly  useful  for  building  bridges  or  mak  ing  automobiles—in  its  limited
place. Alongside it we will develop multiple metaphors, alternative principles
of  evidence,  new  loggias,  catastrophe  theories,  and  new  tribal  ways  to


background image

separate  our  useful  fictions  and  archetypes  from  useless  ones.  The  scattered
shapes of this new civilization will be determined by population and resource
trends;  by  military  factors;  by  value  changes;  by  behavioral  speculations  in
fields  of  consciousness;  by  changes  in  family  structures;  by  global  political
shifts;  by  awakened  individual  Utopian  aspirations;  by  accelerated  cultural
paradigms  and  not  by  technologies  alone.  This  will  mean  designing  new
institutions for controlling our technological leaps into a future. It will mean
replacing obsolete political, economic, territorial, and ecological structures. It
will  mean  evolving  new  micro-decision  making  systems  that  are  both
individually and tribally oriented synthesizing participation and initiation and
new  macro-decision  making  systems  that  are  digitally  spiritual  and
revealingly  autonomous.  Small  elites  can  no  longer  make  major
technological, ecological, or economical decisions. Fractally anarchic clusters
of  individuals  with  integrated  extended  family  structures  and  transhuman
gender  groupings  must  participate  and  calibrate  what  stretches  out  before
them in a neo-pagan assimilation of all before—NOW!—and to be.

Imagine, if you won't, that you are a subversive in this future.
You  conspire  to  be  hidden  by  the  use  of  the  word.  This  act
could  move  you  into  a  position  of  becoming  a  co-conspirator
in the process of desecration.

“It will BE because It is inevitable” Old TOPY proverb.

We plough the field and scattering the would-ship of our plan.

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX B.]

SOURCES ARE RARE

In  the  future  the  spoken  word  will  be  viewed  as  holding  no  power  or
resonance  and  the  written  word  will  be  viewed  as  dead,  only  able  to  be
imbued  with  potential  life  in  its  functional  interactions  with  what  will  have
become  archaic  software  and  programming  archaeologies,  namely  speech.
That is, just as a symphony orchestra preserves a museum of music, of music
considered  seminal  and  part  of  a  DNA-LIKE  spiral  of  culture;  so,  the  word
will be seen as the preservation vehicle in a DNA-like chain of digital break-
throughs and cultural intersections. The word  will  be  viewed,  not  as  a  virus
that  gave  speech,  nor  as  the  gift  of  organic  psychedelics  through  which
civilization (i.e. living in cities) was made so “wondrously” possible, but, as a


background image

necessary  language  skill  for  those  specializing  in  thee  arcane  science  of
Software  Archeology,  or  SoftArch  Processing,  as  it  will  become  known,  in
much the same way as Latin was for so long a required subject and qualifier
of  scholarship  at  prestigious  universities  when  the  drone  majority  found  it
incongruous,  if  not  ludicrous.  Of  course  individuals  will  be  utilizing  laser
based  systems  to  access  and  exit  the  neuro-system  via  the  retina  and  these
systems in turn will transmit, wirelessly, to a new breed of computers using
liquid memory instead of micro-chips. If we are to disbelieve what we don't
hear,  then  conversation  will  be  a  status  symbol  of  the  leisured  classes  and
power elites. As ever the same processes that delineate power, in this case, a
perpetuation  of  an  atrophied  communication  system,  i.e.  words,  will  always
be  appropriated  by  those  who  position  their  means  of  perception  at  an
intersection  diametrically  opposed  to  those  who  oppress  with  it,  for  it,  or
because of it. Put simply, any form of literal or cultural weapon pioneered by
authority  will  some  day  be  used  by  “esoterrorists”  bent  upon  destabilizing
and/or, at least temporarily, destroying its source. The poles become clearer,
thine enemy more known, as the mud settles and we protagonists are exposed
standing  shakily  on  our  rocks,  above  the  Golden  Section  and  visible  to  all
who  would  disown  and  destroy  us.  It  is  in  this  spirit  that  this  work  was
created.

Imagine, if you won't, that you are a subversive in this future. You conspire
to be hidden by the use of the word. This act could move you into a position
of  becoming  a  co-conspirator  in  the  process  of  desecration.  To  conspire
literally means “to breathe together.” Thee all pervading surveillance systems
are—NOW!—so digitized that they have no voice recognition software, this
has also been manifested to protect the conspiracies and debaucheries of the
Control species themselves.

“Hell, even Deities need privacy, son. We used to plot murders and takeovers
in saunas, then bug-proof buildings, now we just talk, son, no one out there
listening, all just PLUGGED IN.”

One fashionable lower class, blue-collar medical expense is the vocal chord
removal  process.  It's  taken  as  a  status  operation.  A  clear  signal  to  one's
contemporaries  that  your  software  interface  is  so  advanced  that  you  need
never consider the use of speech ever again.

The word is finally atrophied. No longer a dying heart, but dead. The bypass


background image

is on. So here you are. You FEEL something is out of balance, you TALK.
They  TALK.  The  world  swims  in  silence.  The  only  place  of  secrecy  is  a
public  place,  the  only  manner  of  passing  on  secrets  is  talking  out  loud.
Neither  protagonist  is  aware  that  the  other  is  TALKING.  If  they  were  all
Hells would be let loose.

Forcible  vocotomies  in  the  street,  subversives  held  down  at  gunpoint,  their
chords  lasered  out  in  seconds.  Loud  laughter  of  a  rich  vocotomy  tout,  the
ultimate status signal “of power.”

Know  the  WORD  is  gone,  its  power  defused,  diffuse,  in  order  that  these
scriptures of the golden eternity be fulfilled.

In the ending, was the WORD.

As  a  recipient  of  this  cluster  you  are  encouraged  to  recall,  and  remain
constantly vigilant of the dilemma it exposes.

It hungers for the death of the word. Rightly so, for we are imprisoned in the
naming  sorcery  that  was  both  built,  and  solidified  within  the  process  of
Control, and more critically and integral to it, submission and subservience.

This death is craved intrinsically by all in order that a showdown may occur,
as  the  World  Preset  Guardians  laser  burn  their  retina  of  lust  for  result.  The
WORD wills to go. It is here to go.

Thee  Brain  Computer  interface  will  replace  all  verbal  media  of
communication,  for  bitter  or  wars,  the  new  being  merely  that  which  is
inevitable. Nurse it along so that it may become a living intelligence system.
Thee Museum of Meanings.

What wills to be reborn wills vary with the input of the user.

Debug the old preset programming. Leave only an empty timezone that you
might later fill with your will and clarity of intent.

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX C.]

CATHEDRAL ENGINE

“VIDEO  IS  THEE  ELECTRONIC  MOLOTOV  COCKTAIL  OF  THEE  TV
GENERATION”

Cause  the  cathode  ray  tubes  to  resonate  and  explode.  You  are  your  own


background image

screen. You own your own screen.

In  this  hallucinatory  state  all  realities  are  equal.  Television
was  developed  to  impose  a  generic  unity  of  purpose:  The
purpose of “control.”

Watching  television  patches  us  into  the  global  mixing  board,  within  which
we  are  all  equally  capable  of  being  victim  or  perpetrator.  The  Internet
carrying audio/video, text, pictures, data and scrap books via modem actually
delivers a rush of potentiality that was previously only advanced speculation.
The  lines  on  thee  television  screen  become  a  shimmering  representation  of
the  infinite  phone  lines  that  transmit  and  receive.  We  have  an  unlimited
situation.  Our  reality  is  already  half-video.  In  this  hallucinatory  state  all
realities  are  equal.  Television  was  developed  to  impose  a  generic  unity  of
purpose:  The  purpose  of  “control.”  To  do  this  it  actually  transmits  through
lines and frequencies of light. Light only accelerates what the brain is. Now
we  can,  with  our  brains,  edit,  record,  adjust,  assemble  and  transmit  our
deepest  convictions,  our  most  mundane  parables.  Nothing  is  true,  all  is
transmitted.  The  brain  exists  to  make  matter  of  an  idea;  television  exists  to
transmit the brain. Nothing can exist that we do not believe in. At these times
consciousness  is  not  centered  in  the  world  of  form,  it  is  experiencing  the
world of content. The means of perception wills to become the program. The
program  wills  to  become  power.  The  world  of  form  wills  to  thereby  reduce
the ratio of subjective, experiential reality, a poor connection between mind
and brain. Clusters of temporary autonomous programs globally transmitted,
received,  exchanged  and  jammed  will  generate  a  liberation  from  consumer
forms and linear scripts and make a splintered test of equal realities in a mass
political  hallucination  transcending  time,  body,  or  place.  All  hallucinations
are real, but some hallucinations are more real than others.

We create programs and “deities,” entities and Armageddons in the following
way: Once we describe, or transmit in any way, our description of an idea, or
an  observed,  or  an  aspired  to  ideal,  or  any  other  concept  that  for  ease  of
explanation we hereafter will to describe as a “deity,” we are the source of it.

We are the source of all that we invoke. What we define and describe exists
through our choosing to describe it. By continued and repeated description of
its parameters and nature, we animate it. We give it life.

At first, we control what we transmit. As more and more individuals believe


background image

in  the  original  sin  of  its  description,  and  agree  on  the  terms  of  linguistic,
visual  and  other  qualities,  this  “deity”  is  physically  manifested.  The  more
belief accrued, the more physically present the “deity” wills to become. At a
certain  point,  as  countless  people  believe  in,  and  give  life  to  that  described
and believed in, the “deity” wills to separate its self from the source. It then
develops an agenda of its own, sometimes in opposition to the original intent
and purpose of the source. The General Order at this intersection becomes go
and it continues to transmit to our brains. Our brains are thus a Neuro-Visual
Screen  for  that  which  has  separated  from  its  source  and  become  a  “deity.”
This  is  in  no  way  intended  as  a  metaphor,  rather  a  speculation  as  to  the
manner in which our various concepts of brain are actually programmed and
replicated.  In  an  omniverse  where  all  is  true  and  everything  is  recorded,  as
Brion  Gysin  wondered,  “who  made  the  original  recordings?”  Or  in  more
contemporary jargon, who programmed the nanotech software? Our response
can  only  be  a  speculative  prescience:  The  Guardians  who  exist  in  an—at
present—unfathomable other world and preset the transmissions in some, as
yet, mysterious way.

Videos can move televisual order and conditioned expectations of perspective
from one place and reassemble its elements as if gluing a smashed hologram
back  together,  all  the  white  knowing  that  each  piece  contains  within  it  the
whole image. In other words, these are all small fragments of how each of us
actually  experiences  life:  through  all  our  senses  simultaneously.  In  every
direction  simultaneously.  Even  in  all  five  dimensions  (at  least!)
simultaneously.  Bombarded  by  every  possible  nuance  and  contradiction  of
meaning  simultaneously.  Quaquaversally.  This  is  a  relentlessly  inclusive
process.  We  do  not  just  view  “life”  anymore,  although  perhaps  we  can,  at
least  potentially,  have  an  option  to  view  everything.  Intention  is  the  key.
What was once referred to as the “viewer” is now also a source of anything to
be viewed, and the Neuro-Visual Screen on which to view it. The constructed
and  ever  increasing  digital  concoction  built  from  millions  of  sources  that  is
commonly  referred  to  as  “Cyberspace”  is  accelerating  towards  deification,
and  separateness.  Towards  the  moment  of  a  sentient  awakening  of  its  own
consciousness  and  agendas  that  we  feel  is  more  aptly  described  as  the
“Psychosphere.”  This  Psychosphere  challenges  us  to  seize  the  means  of
perception and remain thee source.

“Change thee way to perceive and change all memory.”


background image

-Old TOPY proverb.

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX D.]

Since  there  is  no  goal  to  this  operation  other  than  the  goal  of  perpetually
discovering new forms and new ways of perceiving, it is an infinite game. An
infinite game is played for the purpose of continuing to play, as opposed to a
finite game which is played for the purpose of winning or defining winners. It
is an act of freed will to.... No one can “play” who is forced to play.

Play, is indeed, implicitly voluntary.

[THEE SPLINTER TEST -APPENDIX E.]

Thee night under Witches that you close up your book of shadows and open
up  your  neuro-super  highway  to  thee  liquid  blackness  (within  which  dwells
an  entity)  represents  thee  edge  of  present  time.  It  pinpoints  precisely  the
finality of all calendars, wherein it is clear that measurement, in its self, and
of  its  self  equals  “DEATH”  or  “DAATH.”  The  spoken  binds  and  constricts
navigation  unutterably.  The  etymology  of  the  word  spiral  (DNA),  from  the
Greek, indicates an infinitude of perceptive spaces and points of observation,
where  “down,”  “up,”  “across,”  “distance”  and  other  faded  directional  terms
become  redundant  in  an  absolute  elsewhere.  Thee  eyes  have  it  and  they
suggest  a  serpent  that  was  once  the  nearest  metaphor  to  cold  dark  matters

such as wormholes and spaces between. 


background image

MEMENTO MORI: Remember You Must Die

PAUL LAFFOLEY

I. (THANATAESTHETICS)

The  aesthetics  of  death  is  having  a  pseudo-posthumous  revival.  The  Great
Wheel  of  History—the  Zeitgeist  (The  Time  Spirit)—that  allows  the
Juggernaut  (Jagannatha:  Vishnu  the  Sustainer)  to  move  on  has  the  death's
head on its hub. The velocity of the Zeitgeist has never changed. It is just that
our  perception  of  reality  has  speeded  up  sufficiently,  as  we  near  the  end  of
time,  so  that  the  true  nature  of  reality  is  more  apparent  to  all  in  this  post-
secular era of today.

Not only do most people want to know the secret of death—What is it like to
be  dead?—but  also  speculations  like—What  or  where  was  I  before  I  was
born?—or Why does life have to end in death? Are there ontic states distinct
from  life  and  death?  On  street  corners  all  over  the  world  you  can  hear
evidence  of  a  passionate  interest  in  metaphysics,  religious  themes  and
remarks  like—“Why  is  there  something  rather  than  nothing?”  resound  both
audibly between conversationalists and silently in the mind.

The  aesthetics  of  death  is  having  a  pseudo-posthumous
revival.


background image

Thanaton  III,  Paul  Laffoley,  73  1/2”  x  73  1/2”  oil,  acrylic,  ink  and
lettering on canvas, 1989. From the collection of Richard Metzger

The  present  condition  of  serious  discourse  in  the  world,  if  you  would  hold
yourself  back  a  bit  from  who  is  saying  what,  might  sound  medieval.
Metaphysics,  that  division  of  philosophy  that  is  concerned  with  the
fundamental  nature  of  reality  which  includes  Ontology,  Cosmology  and
Epistemology,  is  back  with  a  vengeance—and  this  means  a  concern  for  the
“The Facts of Death.” Gone are the post-Victorian narcissistic snobberies of
the independent-minded experimentists of early modernism. For instance, the
queen  of  the  British  Modern  Movement,  Virginia  Stephen-Woolf  of


background image

Bloomsbury,  once  claimed  in  a  fit  of  “highbrow”  feminine  pique  that  the
most obscene thing in the world is religion. Her existence itself might now be
considered  equally  as  obscene.  The  traditional  theological  categories  of
belief:  Theism,  Atheism,  Non-Theism,  Syncretism,  Skepticism,  Animism,
Polytheism,  Agnosticism  (either  dogmatic  or  methodological)  do  not  really
work any longer. The 19th century position that “God is Dead” offered first
by  Mainländer,  then  by  Nietzsche,  Sarte,  and  finally  the  radical  theology  of
Thomas  Altizer  and  William  Hamilton  in  the  1960s,  ignores  the  fact  that
periods  of  true  secularism  are  the  fertilizer  for  authentic  revivals  of
mysticism.  The  German  philosopher  Philipp  Mainländer  (1841-1876)  born
Philipp  Batz—a  follower  of  the  neo-Buddhism  of  Arthur  Schopenhauer
(1788-1860),  stated  in  his  principle  writing  The  Philosophy  of  Redemption
(1876)  that  the  universe  begins  with  the  death  of  God,  since  God  is  the
principle  of  unity  which  is  shattered  into  the  plurality  of  existence.  It  is
implied, therefore, that God is also the passionate—joy which is now denied
proper  fulfillment  and  expression  as  the  result  of  infinite  dispersal  into  the
realm  of  evil  and  suffering  (the  world  into  which  we  are  thrown).  The
memory of God's original unity and joy persists only in the human realization
that  non-existence  is  superior  to  existence.  When  people  act  upon  the
implications of this awareness by either refusing to perpetuate themselves or
ending  their  existence  with  suicide,  they  are  completing  their  cycle  of
redemption.  This  almost  Neo-Gnostic  mythos  of  nihilism  was  seen  as  the
“cure” for the moral “sickness” that pervaded 19th century Europe, was only
partially  combated  by  Nietzsche's  own  yea-saying  alternative  by  an  ecstatic
transvaluation of values. He based his concept of transvaluation on the theory
of the eternal recurrence of the experience of time and its contents sustaining
vast  cycles.  Believing,  like  the  Roman  poet-scientist  Titus  Lucretius  Carus
(99-55 BCE) author of De Rerum Natura, that the universe is infinite, but the
number  of  its  possible  configurations  is  finite,  it  follows  that  the  present
configuration  of  the  universe  must  be  repeated  time  after  time  in  the  future
until the energy of life becomes continuous with the energy of death.


background image

The  Alchemy  of  History,  Paul  Laffoley,  17”  x  23,”  ink,  letters  on
board, 1975

LeCorbusier  (pseudonym  from  1920  of  the  Swiss-born  French  architect
Charles-E'douard  Jeanneret  Gris  (1887-1965)),  who  was  probably  the  most
influential  figure  in  20th  century  architecture,  shared  with  the  American


background image

engineer-architect-inventor Richard Buckminster Fuller (1895-1983) a belief
in  the  possibility  of  realizing  utopia  on  Earth.  They  both  referred  back  to
Plato's most famous dialogue The Republic. At the end of Book IX the ontic
status of city-state is described as follows:

I understand, he said. You mean the city whose establishment we
have  described,  the  city  whose  home  is  in  the  ideal,  for  I  think
that it can be found nowhere on earth.

Well, said I, perhaps there is a pattern of it laid up in heaven for
him who wishes to contemplate it and so beholding to constitute
himself  its  citizen.  But  it  makes  no  difference  whether  it  exists
now  or  ever  will  come  into  being.  The  politics  of  this  city  only
will be his and of none other.

That seems probable, he said

And at the end of the last book (Book X) Plato describes what is called today
as  “the  Near  Death-Experience.”  It  is  the  tale  of  the  bold  warrior  Er  who  is
slain in battle but does not decay and who wakes up on the twelfth day as he
lay upon his funeral pyre and describes in detail the nature of the afterlife.

When  Saint  Thomas  More  (1478-1535)  wrote  Utopia (literally, nowhere) in
Latin in 1516 he attempted to take Plato's indecisiveness about the existence
of  the  ideal  city  to  satirize  England  under  the  despotic  rule  of  his  one  time
friend  and  eventual  nemesis  King  Henry  VIII  (1491-1547),  who  had  More
beheaded.

Utopia  influenced  Anabaptism,  Mormonism,  and  Communism  due  to  its
appeal  of  naive  realism  of  18th  century  revolutionaries  like  the  philosopher
and  political  provocateur  Jean-Jacques  Rousseau  (1712-1778)  who  wrote
about how to completely destroy the world and values of the Ancien Regime
of  France  and  replace  it  with  utopian  rules  and  visions;  or  the  visionary
architect  Étienne-Louis  Boullée  (1728-1799)  who  from  1778  to  1788
produced  Paper  Architecture  on  a  megalomaniacal  scale  of  unrealized
schemes  of  the  Architecture  of  Death:  tombs,  mausolea,  cenotaph  and
cemeteries  including  the  huge  Cenotaph  of  Newton  (a  vast  sphere  set  in  a
circular  base  topped  with  cypress  trees).  Utopia  as  a  concept  and  a  literary
impulse  has  a  unique  if  paradoxical  history.  Both  LeCorbuiser  and  R.
Buckminster Fuller helped form the contemporary vision of utopic space—a


background image

space that has a ferocious neutrality and how to build with it. Utopic space—
a space that has been hinted at all through recorded civilization. There exist
no  external  clues  as  to  its  existence  or  actual  characteristics.  Reports  of  its
nature have been by people who have entered utopic space and returned like
Er to tell the tale.

One such recent historical person who has entered utopic space and returned
was  Father  Pierre  Teilhard  de  Chardin  (1881-1955),  philosopher  priest  and
paleontologist.  In  his  magnum  opus  Le  Phénoméne  Humain  (1955),
published  immediately  after  his  death,  are  his  two  famous  metaphors  of
utopic space: The Noosphere—the ubiquitous, open, democratic, and forever
repeatable  sphere  of  human  consciousness  or  mental  activity  that  exists  on
the  surface  of  the  Earth  driven  by  the  force  of  evolution,  and  The  Omega
Point—yielding  the  true  definition  of  vitalism  (which  is  the  realization  that
the processes of life are not explicable by the laws of physics and chemistry
and  that  life  is  in  some  part  self-determining  (free-will)),  refer  to  a  space
which merges that which has only history (life) with that which has no history
(death)
. Unfortunately for Teilhard's reputation, he ignored the possibility of
extraterrestrial life forms, but his principles of utopic space still hold.

Utopic  space-a  space  that  has  been  hinted  at  all  through
recorded  civilization.  There  exist  no  external  clues  as  to  its
existence or actual characteristics.

Utopic  space  therefore  is  in  between  the  space  of  life  (the  relative)  and  the
space of death (the absolute) and yet is continuous with both. It is the space
of:

1.  Absolute personal freedom.
2.  Absolute oneness (like the world soul of the Neo-Platonic philosopher

Plotinus (204-274 CE) based on the topology of the fourth dimensional
sphere).

3.  No holiarchies, no hierarchies, and no heteroarchies, only perfect

continuity.

4.  True transdisciplinary knowing, a process of knowledge similar to the

child's mind that faces the cosmos with an eagerness for the
authentically new, and makes no distinctions of time, values, or survival
logic; in fact logic emerges as a by-product.

5.  No natural directions, such as those associated with Cartesian


background image

Coordinates, it can receive information of any kind and in any amount
without the limitations of organization.

6.  Energy which is distinct from that associated with the secular concept of

energy—energy that is efficacious with motion—instead it is energy that
is efficacious without motion.

7.  The conventicle—the only authentic social structure that can enter and

leave this space; the conventicle is a completely future oriented concept
with no elements of past social structures.


background image

The  Nihilitron,  Paul  Laffoley,  73  1/2”  x  73  1/2”  oil,  acrylic,  letters,
India ink on linen, 1985

For most of the 20th century the sense of death in many forms gradually took
over the psyche of the world—wars that grow progressively more dangerous
to  all,  homeless-ness,  populations  that  seem  to  expand  without  reason,  the
gradual  increase  in  world  starvation,  continuous  exposure  to  horrors,  both
social and individual, the rise in personal and social apathy, and finally mass
insanity and sexual neurasthenia as an escape from feeling anything except a
lack of motivation, inadequacy, and psychosomatic symptoms of depression,
nausea, dizziness, loss of all appetites, blurred vision, weakness, drowsiness,
trembling,  thoughts  of  suicide,  paresthesia,  nameless  fears  and  anxieties,  all
subsumed  by  hallucinations—in  short  the  effects  of  violence  being  done  to
the human personality by the poison of absolute evil.

1

The  “Lost  Generation”  of  disillusioned  American  intellectuals  after  World
War I had its counterpart in the disenfranchised German Youth after the same
period.  They  were  the  “Wander-Vogels”  (the  infantilized  wandering  birds)
the exact precursors of the American “hippies” of the 1960s and 1970s.

Right  after  the  Second  World  War  came  the  Beat  Generation

2

  with  their

sharpest  edge  being  honed  by  the  Jewish  stand-up  comic  Lenny  Bruce  who
scorned  the  racism,  conservatism  and  the  affluent  complacency  of  suburban
America.  He  once  asked  an  audience  to  consider  why  it  is  obscene  to  show
sex  in  the  movies  but  not  violence,  or  obscene  to  show  breasts  but  not
obscene to show mutilated body parts. Bruce moved everyone into the world
of  the  “hippies”  which  became  international  in  scope.  It  started
simultaneously  on  Fort  Hill  in  Boston,  Massachusetts  with  the  Mel  Lyman
Commune in the early 1960s, and in the Haight-Ashbury, Golden Gate Park
section  of  San  Francisco.  Wearing  folksy  used  clothes,  beads,  headbands,
sandals,  and  flowers  they  took  us  into  an  aura  of  non-violent  anarchy,
tracking the civil rights movement, concern for the environment, the rejection
of  Western  materialism  and  an  all  consuming  interest  in  the  occult  and  the
mystical and what happens after death. One of the famous rock bands of the
era  was  named  The  Grateful  Dead.  One  of  the  finest  achievements  of  the
hippies was the spearheading of the protest against the US involvement in the
Vietnam War which began in 1954 after the defeat of the French and lasted
until  1975.  The  protest  was  whipped  up  from  the  mid-west  by  the  SDS


background image

(Students for a Democratic Society) and “The Weathermen” its violent inner
core.

Although the hippies took us to the brink of Postmodernism (July 15, 1972),
middle America was left again in a cultural vacuum with no one to guide us
except  the  two  control  freaks  who  formed  the  “inside”  and  the  “outside”  of
hippieland—Timothy  Leary  and  R.  Buckminster  Fuller.  Then  the  Youth
International  Party  (A  “Yippie”  was  a  person  loosely  belonging  to  or
identified with a politically active group of hippies) raised its head above the
crowd and realized it was “all over” but the shouting, and so returned to Wall
Street  and  Madison  Avenue  to  become  young  business  professionals  as  the
“Yuppies.”  They  are  the  young  college  educated  who  are  employed  in  well
paying professions who live and work in or near a large city and contract the
Yuppie flu attempting to fight off yet another British invasion, this time the
Punk Movement of disaffected youth manifesting itself in fashions and music
designed  to  shock  or  intimidate—pins  through  the  skin,  razor  blade
necklaces,  hair  in  various  colors  and  gelled  into  vertical  spikes  with
Frankenstein  make-up,  wearing  yobbo  clothes,  and  listening  to  The  Sex
Pistols, and living on the dole.

Lenny  Bruce  once  asked  an  audience  to  consider  why  it  is
obscene to show sex in the movies but not violence, or obscene
to show breasts but not obscene to show mutilated body parts.

This  physical  dip  into  the  world  of  monsters  and  making  the  celebration  of
Halloween  a  year  round  event  produced  the  inevitable  next  step,  The  Goth;
those who see everyone through distorted lenses like the most famous horror
writer of all time H. P Lovecraft (1890-1937) who could not stand to look at
himself  in  the  mirror.  As  Susan  Sontag  wrote,  reviewing  Diane  Arbus'
photographic documentary homage to Tod Browning's fantastic film, Freaks,
Arbus's  photos  “undercut  politics  ...  by  suggesting  a  world  in  which
everybody is an alien, hopelessly (we are all alone together, sliding forward
on  the  razor  edge  of  life,  egged  on  by  those  behind,  held  back  by  those  in
front)  isolated,  immobilized  in  mechanical,  crippled  identities  and
relationships.  They  render  history  and  politics  irrelevant  ...  by  atomizing  ...
[the  world]  into  horror.”  Browning  directed  Freaks  in  1932  for  MGM,
adapted  from  a  story  called  Spurs  by  Tod  Robbins.  The  story  was  initially
suggested  to  Browning  by  his  friend,  the  famous  German  midget  Harry
Earles. Freaks had everything: Johnny Eck, the boy with half a torso, Martha


background image

the  armless  wonder  (before  the  thalidomide  scare  of  the  late  1950s),  the
Siamese  twins  Daisy  and  Violet  Hiiton—and  dwarfs,  pinheads,  bearded
women, sword swallowers, etc.; in short, the typical array of creatures found
in  a  side-show  at  the  circus  before  these  displays  were  outlawed.  Browning
himself was banned from the film industry for indulging such lowbrow taste
and numbing obscenity.

When  the  terrorists  of  al  Qàedà  struck  the  World  Trade
Center  buildings  with  airplanes  on  September  11,  2001
between  8:45AM  and  9:03AM  I  knew  the  Bauharoque  had
begun.

The Goths, of course, have followed Sontag off the cliff because of what she
says about art. “Much of Modern Art is devoted to lowering the threshold of
what is terrible. By getting used to what formerly, we could not bear to see or
hear,  because  it  was  too  shocking,  painful,  or  embarrassing,  art  changes
morals—that  body  of  psychic  customs  and  public  sanctions  that  draws  a
vague  boundary  between  what  is  emotionally  and  spontaneously  intolerable
and what is not.” This mission statement is what drove the “Théâtre du Grand
Guignol”  (The  French  Theater  of  Fear,  Terror  and  Horror)  to  exist
continuously  at  one  location—20  Rue  Chaptal  in  the  Arrondissement  of
Montmartre, Paris from Wednesday April 11, 1897 until American snuff and
slasher movies put it out of business on Monday, November 26 1962.

The Gothic Sensibility became quickly international so the Noosphere of the
world  was  really  its  origin.  It  was  lauded  at  the  prestigious  Institute  of
Contemporary Art in Boston, Massachusetts in an Exhibition entitled Gothic:
Transmutations  of  Horror  in  Late  Twentieth  Century  Art.
  Curated  by
Christoph Grunenburg, it features the work of 23 artists who according to the
catalogue  “produce  horror  as  well  as  amazement  through  often  repulsive,
fragmented  and  contorted  forms.  Some  employ  a  detached  and  reductive
formal  language  to  evoke  discomfort  and  claustrophobia  or  to  transmute
images of gruesome violence, achieving an equally disconcerting impact.” In
the  catalogue  there  are  reproductions  of  work  by  Julie  Becker,  Monica
Carocci,  Gregory  Crewdson  and  that  monster  from  the  1950s,  Jackson
Pollock,  photographs  of  fashion  designs  by  Thierry  Mugler  and  musical
performances by Marilyn Manson and the rock band Bauhaus. The films that
accompanied the exhibition featured Browning's Freaks.


background image

I went on the Institute's free-day (I believe artists should not have to pay for
anything)  and  found  the  show  somewhat  disappointing.  When  I  attend
exhibitions that purport to display a radical change in sensibility I expect to
be  shown  something  authentically  new.  This  was  not  the  case.  I  had  either
done personal examples of the work shown or had anticipated them. I felt no
jealousy  here.  Leaving  the  ICA  I  realized  why.  The  “Youthquake”  that  was
started  by  Elvis's  hips  in  the  early  1950s  had  finally  run  its  course  and
everyone is affected. There is no more high- or lowbrow taste. We are all hip
now.  Even  the  quintessential  outlaw  motorcycle  gangs  of  Harley-Davidson
riders—The Hell's Angels  (the ad hoc  carrier wave of  the youth movement,
which started in 1948) now has retirement policies. The last time they went to
court,  which  was  in  1993,  it  was  not  to  defend  themselves  against  criminal
charges—but  to  sue  Marvel  Comics  for  damaging  the  club's  “goodwill”  by
issuing  a  comic  book  entitled  Hell's  Angel.  Today,  therefore,  persons
regardless of age have the right to consider (him, her, or it) themselves just as
“alive” as anybody else.

As my foot landed on the last front step of the ICA and I was out on Boylston
Street  heading  toward  my  studio  I  knew  there  was  a  change  coming  much
larger than a change of sensibility. It was the third phase of Modernism after
Postmodernism,  similar  in  the  flow  of  history  to  the  third  section  of  the
Italian  Renaissance  cycle  the  Baroque  just  after  Mannerism.  The  Baroque
artists returned to the logical organizations of early Renaissance with a new
energy  derived  from  the  forms  of  the  High  Gothic  that  artists  of  the  Early
Renaissance  had  eschewed.  In  1986  I  called  our  third  phase  of  Modernism
the  Bauharoque  in  homage  to  the  Bauhaus  (1919-1933)  the  school  that
symbolized  Heroic  Modernism  and  the  Baroque  characterized  by  drama,
movement  and  tension,  grotesqueness,  extravagance,  complexity,  and
flamboyance. The Bauharoque holds onto Modernism but harkens back to the
crazy  energy  of  the  19th  century.  In  1991  Ada  Louise  Huxtable,  America's
leading  architecture  critic,  named  it  the  “Neo-Modern”  or  the  “Post-Post-
Modernism”  (being  neutral  enough  not  to  “inhibit”  creativity)  and  a
Washington,  DC  artist  and  art  critic,  J.  W.  Mahoney,  added  in  1992  to  this
lexicon of the discourse of the future the word “Transmodern,” which I like
because it refers to entering another realm such as death on the cultural scale.

When the terrorists of al Qàedà struck the World Trade Center buildings with
airplanes on September  11, 2001 between  8:45AM and 9:03AM  I knew the


background image

Bauharoque  had  begun.  The  time  symmetry  of  the  presence  of  Minoru
Yamasaki's Twin Towers (a huge eleven—the most ominous of the numbers
—in  the  New  York  skyline)  was  too  much  to  resist.  Yamasaki's  buildings
started Postmodernism with a death and ended it with a death.

That  thieving  maggot-pie  of  the  art  world  composer  Karlheinz  Stockhausen
(1928-), I believe, got it wrong when he declared the attack on 9/11 to be the
greatest artwork in the history of the world (meaning “lowering the threshold
of what is terrible”). This had already been done in 1973 by Andy  Warhol's
Frankenstein
  as  Joan  Hawkins  wrote  in  her  book  Cutting  Edge:  Art-Horror
and the Horrific Avant-Garde
 (2000) about Andy's film:

And  in  Andy  Warhol's  Frankenstein,  Frankenstein  brings  his
female zombie to life in one of the most bizarre copulation scenes
in  the  history  of  cinema.  “To  know  death,  Otto,”  (he  tells  his
assistant  when  he's  finished  penetrating  the  zombie's  “digestive
parts,”) “you have to fuck life in the gallbladder.”

Since the story  of Frankenstein was  written by Mary  Shelley (1797-1851) a
country  girl  of  nineteen,  one  can  only  but  gather  the  inference  that  horror,
terror  and  death  can  be  best  understood  by  the  adolescent  female  because
only they can really know the opposite, the joy and freedom of giving birth.
Thus the practitioners of male dominated aesthetics characteristic of the 20th
century  will  have  trouble  adjusting  to  the  new  Thanataesthetics  of  the  21st.
When Osama bin Laden thought he was handing us a fresh beaker of death to
drink from, he was actually being influenced by Andy Warhol (1928-1987),
that epicene, intersexual maestro of American art, who after 16 years of being
dead, still has us all by the throat. Andy's message is that in the United States
we are not very grown up—the complaint of most women about most men—
and it is time to grow up and face death.

II. (THE TRIMURTI OF DEATH)

Thanataesthetics  can  be  examined  from  three  different  perspectives  of
Transcendent Symbolism. The use of symbolism as the mode of expression is
necessary  because  Utopic  Space,  the  space  that  connects  the  space  of  life
with  the  space  of  death  into  a  developing  continuity,  is  by  nature  an
interdimensional  space  in  between  the  classic  Fourth-Dimensional  Realm
(Time-Solvoid) and the higher Fifth-Dimensional Realm (Eternity-Vosolid).


background image

PERSPECTIVE ONE:

FASHION  AESTHETICS  is  the  expression  of  the  SACRAMENTAL
REVELATION of the human body as a form of energy, distinct from energy
like  electricity  that  informed  Mary  Shelley  of  how  Frankenstein's  Monster
would  come  to  life  and  produce  the  physical  senses,  the  alimentary  and
respiratory systems, as well as the urges for food, sex, information, privacy,
communality,  indifference,  love  and  hate.  Instead  the  SACRAMENTAL  is
described by an eternal energy that is efficacious without motion, and limited
by  the  mathematics  of  the  so-called  Divine  Proportion  or  PHI.  This  meta-
energy  mathematics  was  codified  in  1899  as  the  Greek  letter  O  (PHI),  the
initial  letter  of  the  name  Phidias  (fl.ca.  490-430  BCE),  the  master  sculptor
who designed the Parthenon on the Acropolis in Athens with the help of the
architects Ictinus and Callicrates. Phi refers to the logarithmic or equiangular
spiral, the Fibonacci series (named after Leonardo Fibonacci-Filius Bonacci,
alias Leonardo of Pisa (1175-1250)) sent out to infinity and then divided by
itself, also the parabola and the Golden Section (.382.../.618...) : e

2

 = (Φ+ Φ

′)

2

. The basic equation for the proportion of death is : x + 1/ x = x/1 or x2 - x-

1 = 0. The positive solution Φ: x = (1 + √5) /2 and the negative solution Φ′: x
=  (1-√5)  /2  are  both  evident  in  animal  and  human  forms.  Also  the  Ancient
Egyptians  discovered  that  Π=  (3.1416...)  is  related  to  Φ,  or  Π=  Φ

2

.  (6/5)  or

3.1416...= 2.168... (6/5).

“To  know  death,  Otto,  you  have  to  fuck  life  in  the
gallbladder.” -Udo Kier in Andy Warhol's Frankenstein.

The PHI proportion of death permeates every life form on the planet with the
exception  of  the  Ginkgo  Biloba  Tree  which  is  dated  as  beginning  in  the
Permian  Period  of  the  Paleozoic  Era—286  million  years  ago.  Its  genes,
however, are even older, dating from the Archean Period of the Precambian
Era—4,000  million  years  ago  when  life  was  said  to  appear  as  the  earliest
algae  and  primitive  bacteria.  What  happened  was  the  seeds  of  the  Ginkgo
Biloba  Tree  arrived  on  earth  encapsulated  in  the  frozen  centers  of  comets,
therefore,  could  not  have  committed  any  moral  turpitude  along  the  way.
Some  parts  of  the  seeds  did  thaw  out  to  become  the  beginnings  of  life,  sin,
and death. As it says in Romans 6:21 and 23; “What fruit had ye then in those
things whereof ye are now ashamed? (Seeds speaking to humans) For the end
of those things is death. For the wages of sin is death.”


background image

When  the  Ginkgo  Biloba  appeared  full  blown  in  the  Permian  Period  it  was
realized to be the fabulous TREE OF LIFE (it smells so bad that people are
given  to  avoid  eating  it)—but  in  capsule  form  as  it  is  taken  now,  Ginkgo
Biloba,  is  a  life  extender  because  it  improves  circulation  to  the  genitals  and
the brain. THE TREE OF THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOOD AND EVIL is, of
course, the wild crisp Macintosh Apple Tree.

Sir d'Arcy Wentworth Thompson (1860-1948), one of the most distinguished
scientists of the modern era, sets forth his analysis of the nature of the Divine
Proportion  in  On  Growth  And  Form,  first  written  in  1917  and  revised  in
1942. As an example he describes the equiangular spiral as follows:

“And it follows from this that it is in the hard parts of organisms,
and not the soft, fleshy, actively growing parts, that this spiral is
commonly  and  characteristically  found;  not  in  the  fresh  mobile
tissue  whose  form  is  constrained  merely  by  the  active  forces  of
the moment; but in things like shell and tusk, and horn and claw,
visibly  composed  of  parts  successively  and  permanently  laid
down. The shell-less mollusks are never spiral; the snail is spiral
but not the slug. In short, it is the shell which curves the snail and
not  the  snail  which  curves  the  shell.  THE  LOGARITHMIC
SPIRAL,  IS  CHARACTERISTIC,  NOT  OF  THE  LIVING
TISSUES, BUT OF THE DEAD.”

This energy of eternity, therefore, can transform the sorrow of the ritualized
sacrifice  of  the  time  of  our  lives  into:  fashions,  styles,  modes,  vogues,  fads,
rages and crazes, and into the joy of becoming vessels that receive the Divine
as  nourishment.  This  is  the  penetration  of  the  BEAUTY  BARRIER  to  the
truth  which  then  divulges  THE  LUX  OF  SYNESTHESIA—the  pure  light
that combines all the senses into the universal remedy to all earthly problems,
THE  AZOTH,  which  then  becomes  like  an  all  consuming  drink  from  The
River Lethe.

IT IS, THEREFORE, THE EXTINCTION OF THE PAST.

PERSPECTIVE TWO:

VAMPIRE AESTHETICS, the prophetic, is the expression of the Revelation
of the Soul as the mystery of the tension between Fate and Free Will. There is
a  natural  innocence  to  Fate  and  a  natural  guilt  to  Free  Will.  Many  religious


background image

traditions acknowledge the reality of evil as both sufficient and necessary for
the existence and fulfillment of Free Will. Often at the entrances of religious
establishments  or  organizations  that  require  a  personal  commitment  to  a
mission, you will see a small sign with tasteful graphics beseeching passersby
making Free Will donations to the cause. To the secular mind the sign means
simply giving money, but to more spiritually oriented minds, this is a request
to  give  up  part  of  your  natural  quantum  of  Free  Will.  The  Free  Will,  as
opposed to the controlled will, is considered a fit subject for the exorcism of
evil spirits.

Design for a bumper sticker for “Thanataesthetics,” Paul Laffoley, 9”
x 3”, India ink, letters on board, September 11, 2001

It is the essence of the VAMPIRE that it is a person of either sex that preys
on others. Often the Vampire is described as the reanimated body of a dead
person  believed  to  come  from  the  grave  at  night  and  suck  the  blood  of
persons  asleep,  similar  to  the  Incubus,  an  evil  spirit  that  lies  on  women  in
their sleep and has sexual intercourse with them, and as does the Succubus—
a demon assuming female form in order to have sexual intercourse with men
in  their  sleep.  As  an  example,  a  woman  who  exploits  and  ruins  her  lover—
sometimes  called  a  FEMME  FATALE—is  a  type  of  vampire.  It  can  just  as


background image

easily  be  the  opposite  sex;  L'HOMME  FATALE,  depending  on  whose
gonads are being gored.

From the world of Opera comes the tale of the willful cigarette sweatshop girl
Carmen.  Carmen  challenges  the  Divinity  of  Fate  by  seeking  a  man  who
refuses  to  pay  any  attention  to  her.  To  the  accompaniment  of  the  theme  of
Fate  that  again  and  again  suggests  the  irresistible  but  sinister  attraction,
Carmen pursues the idealistic soldier Don Jose. Her Free Will impels her to
stroll saucily up to the corporal and takes a flower from her bodice and tosses
it in his face. Everyone laughs at his obvious embarrassment. As the factory
bell  sounds  again,  Carmen  and  the  others  leave  him  alone  to  pick  up  the
flower.  The  story  goes  on  with  the  usual  twists  and  turns  of  the  scenario  of
“La Grande Passion” until Don Jose knifes her in the Bull Ring to the sounds
of “The Toreador Song” in praise of the victorious Escamillo, Carmen's next
piece  of  fresh  sexual  meat  to  carve.  Also  the  film  Fatal  Attraction  (1987)
utilizes some of the same themes, but amplified a thousandfold by means of
cinematic tricks and stunts. Glenn Close is the heroine of Fatal Attraction as
she is in the film version of Pierre Choderlos De Laclos's 18th century novel
Liaisons  Dangereuses,  where  the  theme  of  the  powerful  woman  having  sex
without  love  and  crushing  every  “petit  maitre”  in  sight  is  the  kicker.  Glenn
Close,  herself,  always  impressed  me  as  a  woman  who  has  great  difficulty
simply existing.

The  current  use  of  the  “Medieval  Morality  Play”  format  has  attempted  to
revive the tension between FATE and FREE WILL that “Scientism” thought
it had eliminated. By reducing FATE to temporal or causal determinism, and
FREE WILL to temporal or causal indeterminism, according to advocates of
“Scientism”  all  morality  should  vanish  into  a  cloud  of  unknowingness  and
neutrality. Secularism would reign. The Soul's only salvation, however, is to
be caught up in the conflict between the world-views of the future and one's
present  personal  agenda.  Trying  to  avoid  the  mystery  of  the  conflict  by
reasoning  that,  “we  are  free  to  do  what  we  will,  but  we  are  morally
responsible only for what we do in the future, and not for what we are right
now,” will not work.

But  for  VAMPIRE  AESTHETICS  to  truly  seek  the  phenomenology  of  the
future,  it  must  penetrate  The  Sublime  Barrier  established  by  the  scientific
world-view.


background image

The  Sublime  was  popularized  by  Boileau's  translation  of  Longinus  into
French  in  1674  and  by  Edmund  Burke  (1729-1797)  who  wrote  A
Philosophical  Enquiry  into  the  Origin  of  Our  Ideas  of  the  Sublime  and  the
Beautiful
  (1757).  Its  aim  was  to  break  through  the  control  by  the  scientific
worldview established in the 17th century. Two of the major “control freaks”
of  the  time  could  not  deal  with  the  sublime  and  tried  to  stop  the  growing
interest in it. Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1793) an English portrait painter and
the  first  president  of  the  Royal  Academy  in  London  in  1768  (and  also  the
constant target of vituperation by mystical painter-poet William Blake (1757-
1827))  said  in  1790:  “The  sublime  in  painting,  as  in  poetry,  so  overpowers
and  takes  possession  of  the  whole  mind  that  no  room  is  left  for  attention  to
minute criticism” (which, of course, was his only artistic forte).

In  the  same  year  Immanuel  Kant  (1724-1804),  that  German  philosopher  of
the ontology of doubt, came up with the one-liner, when he discovered that a
new sensibility might be breaking into his personal intellectual fortress: “The
sublime, it is an outrage on the human imagination.”

Those  who  tried  to  characterize  the  sublime  agreed  that  it  referred  to  the
horror  of  infinite  spatial  extension,  the  sense  of  inhuman  extraordinariness,
and  the  grandeur  and  terror  of  nature  in  the  raw—in  other  words  what  is
meant by the emotion that goes beyond fear: DIVINE AWE.

The sublime helped launch the Romantic and Symbolist Movements in their
individual assessments of the human personality and its motivations which is
found  without  lies  only  in  the  subconscious:  the  will  to,  power,  love,  hate,
lust,  destroy  and  die.  This  is  the  revelation  of  the  prophetic  and  it  is,
therefore, the extinction of the present.

PERSPECTIVE THREE:

ZOMBIE AESTHETICS, the mystical, is the expression of the relation of the
spirit  of  the  sacred.  It  is  what  cannot  be  named,  limited,  or  known  by  the
ordinary human consciousness, because it is prior to any distinction that can
be  made.  As  Plato  implied  in  the  Timaeus,  the  spirit  or  the  godhead  can
emanate because it is distinct from the form of THE SAME, the form of THE
DIFFERENT, and the form of THE EXISTENT. The spirit, therefore, unites
the  physical  with  the  metaphysical,  becoming  with  being.  It  is  the  horror  of
darkness,  the  wonder  of  light,  the  inevitable  universal  structure  which  is


background image

manifested by the simultaneity of the real and the illusory.

A zombie is a dead person—or, more precisely, the soulless body of a dead
person—that has been artificially brought back to life, usually through magic.
Lacking the ingredient of consciousness, the zombie's motions are undirected,
mechanical,  and  robot  like.  By  extension,  living  people  who  behave  like
unconscious  automatons  are  sometimes  referred  to  as  zombies,  like  Elvis
Presley (1935-1977) one year before his death or the current state of Michael
Jackson  (1958-)  and,  of  course,  the  culturally  ubiquitous  Andy  Warhol
(1928-1987) for his whole life.

The  term  zombie  seems  to  be  derived  from  the  name  of  the  Python  God  of
certain  African  tribes  like  those  in  Northern  Angola,  and  it  is  similar  to
Pytho,  the  serpent  killed  by  Apollo  that  produced,  the  Delphic  Oracle.  The
Bantu  language  Kimbundu  has  a  word  NZÚMBE  meaning  ghost  or  the
“walking  dead,”  or  the  spirit  of  the  dead.  Zombie  could,  therefore,  be
connected  to  ancestor  worship  and  the  boa  constrictor.  Wade  Davis,  an
ethnobiologist,  studied  Haitian  zombies  and  found  that  they  were  actually
people  who  were  given  drugs  that  made  them  appear  dead  and  then  buried
alive.  They  were  given  strong  poison,  usually  as  a  powder  in  food,  of
Bufotoxin  and  Tetrodotoxin—similar  to  natural  poisons  such  as  Botox  that
are  used  in  cosmetic  surgery  today.  The  victim  who  receives  the  potion
experiences  malaise,  dizziness,  and  a  tingling  that  soon  becomes  a  total
numbness. The person then suffers excessive salivating, sweating, headaches,
and  general  weakness,  both  blood  pressure  and  body  temperature  drop,  and
the pulse is quick and weak. This is followed by diarrhea and regurgitation.
The  victim  then  undergoes  respiratory  distress,  until  the  entire  body  turns
blue (Blue Man Group). Sometimes the body goes into wild twitches (Elvis
Presley), after which it is totally paralyzed (Michael Jackson), and the person
falls into a coma in which he or she appears to be dead (Andy Warhol).


background image

Cosmogonic  Historicity,  Paul  Laffoley,  17”  x  27”,  ink,  letters  on
board, 1971

Exposure to an overdose of visual kitsch (the world of bad taste) can produce
the  same  symptoms,  such  as  in  “Graceland,”  “Neverland,”  “Times  Square,”
“Las Vegas,” “Disneyland,” Vienna, Austria, and Switzerland.


background image

The  Symbolist  Movement  in  art  (1880-1910)  (official  birth  September  18,
1886 in Paris, France) develops the use of kitsch to protect the mystical. The
symbolists  were  concerned  about  decadence,  memento  mori,  the  concept  of
ruin,  the  fin-de-siècle,  and  history  that  runs  backward  as  in  the  writings  of
Plato, Hesiod, and Hinduism. Completely opposing the optimistic progress of
the  18th  century,  the  symbolist  viewed  society  as  decadent;  therefore,  the
criminal  classes  were  the  avant-garde.  They  defined  themselves  as  guilty  of
crimes  of  which  society  had  yet  to  conceive  and  expressed  this  idea  in  art
forms  that  appeared  decadent  to  society  because  society  had  yet  to  achieve
this new level of decadence.

Since  a  symbol  suggested  the  presence  of  the  numinous  and  transcendent
utopic  space,  it  had  to  be  protected  by  nested  shells  of  visual  kitsch  as
deliberate lies so that society at large cannot reduce the symbol's power to the
level  of  marketing  cliche  which  has  been  done  to  so  much  of  contemporary
culture.

There  are  five  semiotic  levels  or  shells  surrounding  the  sacred  content  of  a
symbol:

1.  The lowest level is THE SIGN: This is information by convention, like a

made up code, game or system or an advertising campaign. The viewer
of the sign feels completely empowered and epistemically active and the
content of the sign is passive.

2.  The nest level is THE INDEX: This is information by symptom. There

is something real out there but all we have are its tracks or its forensic
indications of existence. The knower is a bit more passive and that
which is a bit more active.

3.  A still higher level is THE ICON: This is the actual depicting of the

structure of the content of the symbol. The knower and that which is
known are equal in power.

4.  The next to last level is THE ARCHETYPE: This semiotic concept was

made famous by the psychologist Carl Gustav Jung (1975-1961), in
Basel, Switzerland (Switzerland is, of course, a high-kitsch area on the
planet).

5.  The Archetype tips the scales in favor of the epistemic power of the

content of the symbol and moves from subjective to the objective. Jung
declared the journey of the soul which he called Heilsweg as the burning


background image

of the unconscious contents into an indivdual's consciousness. Because
the archetypes were shown to be the same throughout history and in all
cultures, he felt he had demonstrated the existence of a collective
unconscious that affected both waking and dreaming life.

6.  The innermost level or shell is THE OBJECTIVE SYMBOL of the

sacred or divine essence experienced as pure numinousity. Here the
kitsch barrier has been penetrated and the epistemic relation between the
knower and that which is known is inversed. The knower has become
has become like a zombie—totally passive—and the knowledge goes
beyond the objective into the realm of total, complete, active, power, the
aspect of which the knower can not voluntarily avoid, as the desire to
know is now absolutely satisfied.

In Canto 33 (lines 109-120) of II Paradiso (the third canticle of The  Divine
Comedy
),  the  poet  Dante  Alighieri  (1265-1321)  presents  the  beatific  vision
(the direct knowledge of God) in just such a manner:

Not that within THE LIVING LIGHT there was

more than a sole aspect of the divine

which is what IT has always been,

yet as I learned to see more, and THE POWER

OF VISION GREW IN ME, that single aspect,

AS I CHANGED, SEEMED TO ME TO CHANGE ITSELF.

Within its depthless clarity of substance,

I saw the great light shine into three circles

in the three clear colors bound in one same space;

the first seemed to reflect the next like a rainbow

equally breathed forth by the other two.

It is the extinction of the present. 

Endnotes

1

 Both LeCorbusier and Fuller were developing their most creative ideas

prior to the publication of Le Phenoméne Humain and therefore, emphasized
only part of Teilhard's vision of utopic space. From 1920-1925 LeCorbusier


background image

with his partner Amedée Ozenfant the painter (1886-1966) started a
magazine called L'Espirit Nouveau. The contributions became influential
texts—a heady brew of technology, messianic slogans proclaiming the
supposed moral and hygienic virtues of the architectural language of the
“Golden Section” and lessons derived from antiquity that found many
devotees. In his writings LeCorbusier defined architecture as a play of
masses brought together by light, and advocated that buildings should be
practically constructed as a modern machine, an idea derived from the
futurist architect Antonio Sant' ‘Elia (1888-1916), complete with rational
planning, and capable of being erected using mass-produced components.
What Le Corbusier took from utopic space was absolute personal freedom
for his style and individual buildings, but for his urban design projects like
La Ville Radieuse (The Radiant City) his misinterpretetation of the concept
of the conventicle was the metaphor as a beehive for people.

In  the  1920s  he  anticipated  the  political  structures  of  the  combination  of
fascism and socialism which characterized the 1930s. In fact during the early
1940s  after  the  Nazis  invaded  France,  LeCorbusier,  whose  architectural
commissions  began  to  dry  up,  found  it  easy  to  compromise  his  political
convictions and accepted jobs from the collaborationist Vichy government.

Jane  Butzner  Jacobs  (1916-),  who  began  her  career  as  a  critic  for
Architectural  Forum  in  1952,  started  to  attack  the  dogma  of  heroic
modernism  especially  the  rules  set  forth  by  the  CIAM  (Congrès
Internationaux D'Architecture Moderne) dominated first by the Bauhaus and
then  by  LeCorbusier.  The  CIAM  lasted  from  1928  to  1959.  Jacobs  claimed
that the CIAM was killing cities, especially American cities where there was
enough  money  to  put  “urban  renewal”  projects  into  practice.  These  projects
often resembled cemetery headstones uniformly laid out on carpets of grass.
The  most  famous  project  was  by  Minoru  Yamasaki  (1912-1986),  an
American architect of Japanese descent. He built public housing in St. Louis,
Missouri—the  infamous  Pruitt-Igoe  scheme,  from  1950-1958.  As  architect
and critic Charles Jencks wrote in 1977, when HUD (The Office of Housing
and Urban Development) blew up the Pruitt-Igoe on July 15, 1972 at 3:32PM
Post-Modernism began, and Modernism died.

2

 In 1952 John Clellon Holmes wrote a book called Go (which was reissued

in 1959 under the title The Beat Boys). It was the first indication of the Beat
sensibility. During this early period Hollywood film stars such as James


background image

Dean (I Am Immortal), Montgomery Clift (More Sensitive than a Broadway
Playwright), or Marlon (The Wild One) Brando were shown on the silver
screen through a gossamer veil of gayness to help promote the sensibility to
suburban America by means of appealing to the developing libidos of
preadolescent females. Later the real edge of the Beat Generation was honed
by poets such as Allen Ginsberg who became famous overnight at his first
reading of Howl: Part / at the Six Gallery on October 13, 1955 in San
Francisco. Ginsberg's poetry mates such as Gregory Corso offered many
works (but his most revealing was Marriage-the Happy Birthday of Death,
1960), or Laurence Ferlinghetti who published his poems Pictures of the
Gone World
 in 1955 for $0.75 as the first title in The City Lights “Pocket
Poems” editions.

But  it  was  the  novelists  of  the  period,  in  the  popular  imagination,  who
became  the  sine  qua  non  of  the  Beat  Generation.  William  S.  Burroughs
served  up  Junkie  in  1953  and  Naked  Lunch  in  1957  and  of  course,  the
reigning prince of the Beats, the bad boy drunk from Lowell, Massachusetts,
Jack Kerouac, whose second novel On The Road, while published late in the
game-September  5,  1957—took  the  media  over  like  a  big,  bad,  belated,
blitzkrieg. His face was seen all over the power pop magazines of the 1950s:
Time,  Life,  Look,  Colliers,  with  a  greater  frequency  than  Elvis  or  Jackson
Pollock. To the general public, the autumn of 1957 was the beginning of the
Beat Generation. What added to the sense of America's cultural helplessness
was the fact that 30 days after the novel (October 4, 1957), the first of a series
of  Soviet—Earth  orbiting  satellites—Sputnik  I—was  launched,  and  the  first
battle of the Cold-War (1945-1990) was won and not by the US. In Russian
the  word  “sputnik”  means  “traveling  companion”  or  the  translation  of  the
world “poputchik” meaning “fellow traveler”: one that sympathizes with and
often  furthers  the  ideals  and  program  of  an  organized  group  (as  the
Communist Party) without membership in the group of regular participation
in  its  activities.  A  steel  sphere  23  inches  in  diameter  and  weighing  185  lbs.
containing  a  simple  radio  transmitter—the  symbol  of  Soviet  propaganda  in
space cast a pall over the United States and caused every young person of the
time  to  assess  the  death  karma  we  had  created  by  dropping  “Little  Boy”  on
Hiroshima  Japan  August  6,  1945  at  8:15AM.  Three  days  later,  August  9,
Nagasaki  was  also  eliminated  from  the  world  atlas.  The  assessment  entered
the American lexicon as “Beatnik.” America had its own Hiroshima of pride.


background image

JOE IS IN THE DETAILS

JOE COLEMAN


background image

Love Song, courtesy Joe Coleman

Exorcism, Alchemy, Mysticism, all of these things exist in my work, but only
in the most practical and instinctual sense of a very personal need. Many of
these  concerns  are  apparent  at  the  first  encounter  with  one  of  my  paintings.
My  portraits  are  dissections  of  a  soul.  The  paintings  are  tombs  that  contain
the things that define a life. At the center the fragile bone and flesh and the
clothing.  Around  the  center  you  will  find  objects  important  to  this  life.  The
homes  that  held  and  expressed  this  life.  Important  friends  and  family.
Defining  events.  Dreams.  The  thoughts  and  words  expressed  by  and  about
this being. All presented on the surface with equal importance.

From a distance, the painting has a direct confrontation with the viewer; full
of information. If the viewer comes closer more information is revealed. The
more one looks the more is revealed. If the viewer uses a magnifying lens or
the special lenses I used to paint it, microscopic images are revealed, not just
textures but tiny, minute scenes related to the subject.

Some  of  the  detail  is  buried  underneath  the  painted  surface.  For  example  I
have spent many hours researching and painting an historical figure's pocket
watch and then paint the pocket over it.

This  process  is  enacted  without  sketching  the  composition  beforehand.  I
complete  a  square  inch  at  a  time,  starting  at  any  point,  letting  the  painting
slowly  reveal  itself  to  me.  I  am  intensely  researching  the  subject  and  as
information is filtered through me and onto the painting's surface it creates a
densely woven narrative pattern. Pattern is the only order I trust. I care only
about the detail, the composition is unimportant. It will reveal itself.

Exorcism, Alchemy, Mysticism, all of these things exist in my
work, but only in the most practical and instinctual sense of a
very personal need.

With magnified lenses used by jewelers and a one-hair brush I submerge into
a microscopic world. I build sets, stitch costumes, and act out all of the parts.
I  become  the  person  I  am  painting;  perhaps  like  method  acting,  maybe  it's
what is called “the assumption of the God form” in occult books. But it is the
way in which I can conjure a soul.


background image

A New York Pirate, courtesy Joe Coleman

The painted surface is on a flat piece of wood finely sanded which is glued
onto another piece of wood that contains fabric related to the subject or my
connection to the subject. When this is attached to the painted frame about 1
to 1½ inches show between the painted frame and the painted wood, giving
the effect that the painting is floating within the frame.

In  the  painting  Mommy/Daddy  the  picture  floats  on  actual  clothing  my
parents wore. A black satin dress of my mother and a USMC (United States
Marine Corps) shirt my father wore in Iwo Jima. The two fabrics connect at
the  very  point  where  I  have  joined  their  bisected  dependant  halves.  In  the
painting  A  New  York  Pirate  the  painting  is  floating  on  the  actual  shirt  that
Elmo Patrick Sonnier wore to his execution. Love Song, which is a love song
in paint to my wife, Whitney Ward, is floating on bed sheet that we fucked on


background image

and  the  four  corners  of  the  outer  frame  contain  reliquaries  holding  co-
mingled  body  parts:  a  cyst  from  my  neck  with  Whitney's  blood,  Whitney's
fingernails mixed with my hair, etc....

This  treatment  of  objects  as  fetish  is  partially  based  on  my  Catholic
upbringing but it is an aspect of Catholicism that is heavily rooted in pagan
ritual.  Objects  have  magical  powers.  This  belief  is  so  deep  within  me  that  I
have  turned  my  own  home  into  a  shrine  of  fear,  desire  and  mystery.  To
possess  an  object  of  magic  is  to  possess  the  object's  power.  The  use  of
magical  objects  is  vital  to  my  paintings.  For  A  New  York  Pirate,  Sonnier's
shirt  helps  to  raise  a  monster's  power  and  cage  it  within.  In  Love  Song  the
objects  serve  to  protect  and  immortalize  our  passion  for  each  other.  In
Mommy/Daddy  they  serve  as  physical  reminder  of  my  creation  and  as  a
warning of the past.

Magical elements in my performances have parallels but it is in the realm of
the  priest  or  shaman.  In  my  early  teens  I  was  compelled  to  strap  onto  my
body  homemade  explosives  that  were  attached  to  a  cookie  tin  from  my
mother's kitchen. I wore this device on my chest and then hid it by wearing
one  of  my  father's  shirts  which  was  slightly  too  big  for  me.  I  would  then
invade  stranger's  homes  and  ignite  myself;  in  the  smoke  and  confusion  I
would disappear. I eventually turned these primal acts of suburban terror into
a  stage  performance.  In  1981  as  Professor  Momboozoo  (a  merging  of
parental  forces:  Mom=mother,  Booze=father)  in  New  York's  alternative
performance  space  “The  Kitchen,”  I  delivered  an  apocalyptic  sermon  then
self-detonated, bit the heads off of live rats and then proceeded to chase out
the entire audience from the theater with a double-barreled shotgun. Fire and
explosion are elemental forces; the biting off of the head of a live animal is a
rite of passage. These acts served to put me into a heightened state of being.
Transgression into transcendence into a pre-civilized existence that for me set
off  an  internal  psychodrama,  releasing  deep-seated  conflicts  of  childhood
producing a slowly diminishing catharsis until the performances of Professor
Momboozoo ended.

I  have  spent  many  hours  researching  and  painting  an
historical  figure's  pocket  watch  and  then  paint  the  pocket
over it.


background image

Mommy/Daddy, courtesy Joe Coleman

With magnified lenses used by jewelers and a one-hair brush I
submerge  into  a  microscopic  world.  I  build  sets,  stitch
costumes,  and  act  out  all  of  the  parts.  I  become  the  person  I
am  painting;  perhaps  like  method  acting,  maybeit's  what  is


background image

called “the assumption of the God form” in occult books. But
it is the way in which I can conjure a soul.

As with the paintings there are many levels produced connecting ancient and
modern, pagan and Christian. They also create a cultural echo that returns to
me in strange cryptic symbols, like when game show host and animal rights
activist  Bob  Barker  spearheaded  my  arrest  for  biting  the  heads  off  of  mice
during a performance. When he condemned me in the press this “BARKER”
became my sideshow pitchman. Or when the Boston police had me arrested
after  a  performance  at  the  Boston  Film  and  Video  Foundation  in  which  I
exploded while hanging over the audience. The district attorney charged me
(the  arrest  warrant  read  “Joe  Coleman  AKA  ‘Dr.  Momboozoo’”)  with
“possession of an infernal machine”—a charge my lawyer said had not been
used since the 1800s. The words in the charge imply something diabolical.

As  with  all  of  my  work  I  am  concerned  only  with  the  details,  the  whole

picture will reveal itself to me when it wants...or not. 


background image

ARE YOU ILLUMINATED?

PHIL HINE

Magic is often referred to in terms of being a path, a spiritual quest, a voyage
of  self-discovery,  or  an  adventure.  However  you  want  to  dress  it  up,  one
point is clear, it is a means of bringing about Change. For this change to be
effective,  it  is  important  that  you  be  able  to  set  the  effects  of  your  magical
work within a context—to be able to make sense of them and integrate them
into a dynamic interaction with a moving, fluid universe.

Initiation  is  the  term  which  magicians  use  to  examine  this
process  of  integration,  and  Illumination
  is  one  of  its  most
important by-products.

This requires a sense (however tenuous) of where you have been, and where
you  are  “going.”  At  times  these  anchor-points  will  seem  to  be  solid,  and  at
others,  ephemeral  and  faint.  Initiation  is  the  term  which  magicians  use  to
examine  this  process  of  integration,  and  Illumination  is  one  of  its  most
important by-products.

INITIATION AS A PROCESS

There  appears  to  be  some  misunderstanding  over  what  exactly  the  term
“initiation”  means.  Occasionally  one  bumps  into  people  who  consider
themselves as “initiates” and seem to consider themselves somehow “above”
the rest of humanity. Particularly irritating are the self-styled “initiates” who
let  drop  teasing  bits  of  obscure  information  and  then  refuse  to  explain  any
further  because  their  audience  are  not  “initiates.”  The  term  itself  seems  to
crop up in a wide variety of contexts—people speak of being “initiated” into
groups,  onto  a  particular  path,  or  of  initiating  themselves.  Some  hold  that
“initiation”  is  only  valid  if  the  person  who  confers  it  is  part  of  a  genuine
tradition,  others  that  it  doesn't  matter  either  way.  Dictionary  definitions  of
initiation allude to the act of beginning, or of setting in motion, or entry into
something.  One  way  to  explain  initiation  is  to  say  that  it  is  a  threshold  of
change which we may experience at different times in our lives, as we grow
and develop. The key to initiation is recognizing that we have reached such a


background image

turning  point,  and  are  aware  of  being  in  a  period  of  transition  between  our
past and our future. The conscious awareness of entering a transitional state
allows us to perhaps, discard behavioral/emotional patterns which will be no
longer valid for the “new” circumstances, and consciously take up new ones.

What magical books often fail to emphasize is that initiation is a process. It
doesn't  just  happen  once,  but  can  occur  many  times  throughout  an
individual's  life,  and  that  it  has  peaks  (initiatory  crises),  troughs  (black
depression or the “dark night of the soul”) and plateaus (where nothing much
seems to be going on). Becoming aware of your own cycles of change, and
how  to  weather  them,  is  a  core  part  of  any  developmental  process  or
approach  to  magical  practice.  The  key  elements  or  stages  of  the  initiation
process  have  been  extensively  mapped  by  anthropologists  such  as  Joseph
Campbell.  While  they  are  mostly  used  to  describe  stages  of  shamanic
initiation, they are equally applicable to other areas of life experience.

CRISIS AND CALL

In shamanic societies the first stage of the initiation process is often marked
by  a  period  of  personal  crises  and  a  “call”  towards  starting  the  shamanic
journey.  Most  of  us  are  quite  happy  to  remain  within  the  conceptual  and
philosophical boundaries of Consensus Reality (the everyday world). For an
individual  beginning  on  the  initiatory  journey,  the  crisis  may  come  as  a
powerful vision, dreams, or a deep (and often disturbing) feeling to find out
what  is  beyond  the  limits  of  normal  life.  It  can  often  come  as  a  result  of  a
powerful  spiritual,  religious  or  political  experience,  or  as  a  growing
existential discontent with life. Our sense of being a stable self is reinforced
by the “walls” of the social world in which we participate—yet our sense of
uniqueness  resides  in  the  cracks  of  those  same  walls.  Initiation  is  a  process
which  takes  us  “over  the  wall”  into  the  unexplored  territories  of  the
possibilities  which  we  have  only  half-glimpsed.  This  first  crisis  is  often  an
unpleasant experience, as we begin to question and become dissatisfied with
all  that  we  have  previously  held  dear—work,  relationships,  ethical  values,
family  life  can  all  be  disrupted  as  the  individual  becomes  increasingly
consumed by the desire to “journey.”

One way to explain initiation is to say that it is a threshold of
change  which  we  may  experience  at  different  times  in  our
lives, as we grow and develop.


background image

The internal summons may be consciously quashed or resisted, and it is not
unknown  for  individuals  in  tribal  societies  to  refuse  “the  call”  to  shamanic
training—no small thing, as it may lead to further crises and even death. One
very common experience of people who feel the summons in our society is an
overpowering sense of urgency to either become “enlightened” or to change
the  world  in  accordance  with  emerging  visions.  This  can  lead  to  people
becoming  “addicted”  to  spiritual  paths,  wherein  the  energy  that  may  have
been formerly channeled into work or relationships is directed towards taking
up spiritual practices and becoming immersed in “spiritual” belief systems.

The  “newly  awakened”  individual  can  be  (unintentionally)  as  boring  and
tiresome as anyone who has seized on a messianic belief system, whether it
be  politics,  religion,  or  spirituality.  It  is  often  difficult,  at  this  stage  in  the
cycle,  to  understand  the  reaction  of  family,  friends  and  others  who  may  not
be  sympathetic  to  one's  newfound  direction  or  changes  in  lifestyle.  Often,
some  of  the  more  dubious  religious  cults  take  advantage  of  this  stage  by
convincing young converts that “true friends” etc., would not hinder them in
taking up their new life, and that anyone who does not approve, is therefore
not a “true friend.”

There  are  a  wide  variety  of  cults  which  do  well  in  terms  of  converts  from
young people who are in a period of transition (such as when leaving home
for the first time) and who are attracted to a belief/value system that assuages
their  uncertainties  about  the  world.  Another  of  the  problems  often
experienced  by  those  feeling  the  summons  to  journey  is  a  terrible  sense  of
isolation or alienation from one's fellows—the inevitable result of moving to
the  edge  of  one's  culture.  Thus  excitement  at  the  adventure  is  often  tinged
with  regret  and  loss  of  stability  or  unconscious  participation  with  one's
former world. Once you have begun the process of disentanglement from the
everyday world, it is hard not to feel a certain nostalgia for the lost former life
in  which  everything  was  (seemingly)  clear-cut  and  stable,  with  no
ambiguities or uncertainties.

A  common  response  to  the  summons  to  departure  is  the  journey  into  the
wilderness—of  moving  away  from  one's  fellows  and  the  stability  of
consensual  reality.  A  proto-shaman  is  likely  to  physically  journey  into  the
wilderness,  away  from  the  security  of  tribal  reality,  and  though  this  is
possible for some Westerners, the constraints of modern living usually mean
that  for  us,  this  wandering  in  the  waste  is  enacted  on  the  plane  of  ideas,


background image

values and beliefs, wherein we look deeply within and around ourselves and
question  everything,  perhaps  drawing  away  from  social  relations  as  well.
Deliberate  isolation  from  one's  fellows  is  a  powerful  way  of  loosening  the
sense of having fixed values and beliefs, and social deprivation mechanisms
turn up in a wide variety of magical cultures.

THE INITIATORY SICKNESS

In shamanic cultures, the summons to journey is often heralded by a so-called
“initiatory sickness,” which can either come upon an individual suddenly, or
creep  slowly  upon  them  as  a  progressive  behavioral  change.  Western
observers have labeled this state as a form of “divine madness,” or evidence
of  psychopathology.  In  the  past,  anthropologists  and  psychologists  have
labeled  shamans  as  schizophrenic,  psychotic,  or  epileptic.  More  recently,
western  enthusiasts  of  shamanism  (and  antipsychiatry)  have  reversed  this
process  of  labeling  and  asserted  that  people  as  schizophrenic,  psychotic  or
epileptic  are  proto-shamans.  Current  trends  in  the  study  of  shamanism  now
recognize the former position to be ethnocentric—that researchers have been
judging  shamanic  behavior  by  western  standards.  The  onset  of  initiatory
sickness  in  tribal  culture  is  recognized  as  a  difficult,  but  potentially  useful
developmental  process.  Part  of  the  problem  here  is  that  western  philosophy
has  developed  the  idea  of  “ordinary  consciousness,”  of  which  anything
beyond this range is pathological, be it shamanic, mystical, or drug-induced.
Fortunately for us, this narrow view is being rapidly undermined.

The  Dark  Night  is  a  way  of  bringing  the  soul  to  stillness,  so
that  a  deep  psychic  transformation  may  take  place.  In  the
Western Esoteric Tradition, this experience is reflected in the
Tarot card “The Moon.”

Individuals undergoing the initiatory sickness do sometimes appear to suffer
from fits and “strange” behavior, but there is an increasing recognition that it
is  a  mistake  to  sweepingly  attach  western  psychiatric  labels  onto  them  (so
that  they  can  be  explained  away).  Shamans  may  go  through  a  period  of
readjustment,  but  research  shows  that  they  tend  to  become  the  healthiest
people in their tribes, functioning very well as leaders and healers.

Transitional  states  showing  similar  features  to  the  initiatory  sickness  have
been  identified  in  other  cultures'  mystical  and  magical  practices,  which


background image

western  researchers  are  beginning  to  study,  as  practices  from  other  cultures
gain popularity in the west.

THE DARK NIGHT OF THE SOUL

St. John of the Cross, a Christian mystic, wrote of this experience:

[it]...puts  the  sensory  spiritual  appetites  to  sleep,  deadens  them,
and  deprives  them  of  the  ability  to  find  pleasure  in  anything.  It
binds  the  imagination,  and  impedes  it  from  doing  any  good
discursive work. It makes the memory cease, the intellect become
dark and unable to understand anything, and hence it causes the
will  to  become  arid  and  constrained,  and  all  the  faculties  empty
and useless. And over this hangs a dense and burdensome cloud,
which afflicts the soul, and keeps it withdrawn from God.

When  entering  the  “Dark  Night”  one  is  overcome  by  the  sense  of  spiritual
dryness  and  depression.  The  idea,  expressed  in  some  quarters,  that  all  such
experiences  are  to  be  avoided  in  favor  of  a  peaceful  life,  shows  up  the
superficiality of so much of contemporary living. The Dark Night is a way of
bringing the soul to stillness, so that a deep psychic transformation may take
place.  In  the  Western  Esoteric  Tradition,  this  experience  is  reflected  in  the
Tarot  card  “The  Moon”  and  is  the  “hump”  in  an  individual's  spiritual
development  where  any  early  benefits  of  meditation,  Pathworking  or
disciplines  appear  to  cease,  and  there  is  an  urge  to  abandon  such  practices
and  return  to  “everyday”  life.  This  kind  of  “hump”  which  must  be  passed
through  can  be  discerned  in  different  areas  of  experience,  and  is  often
experienced by students on degree courses and anybody who is undergoing a
new learning process which involves marked life changes as well.

MACRO AND MICRO-INITIATIONS

Generally  speaking,  there  are  two  kinds  of  initiatory  experience—
Microscopic  and  Macroscopic.  Macroscopic  initiations  can  be  characterized
as  being  major  life  shifts,  traumas  that  sweep  upon  us—the  collapse  of  a
long-term relationship, the crash of a business or the sudden knowledge that
you have a terminal illness. Such experiences are global, which is to say that
they send shock waves into every aspect of our lives.

Microscopic  initiations  are  more  specific  in  their  actions.  One  day  I  was


background image

sitting  tapping  figures  into  the  company  accounting  program,  when  I
suddenly  found  myself  thinking  “I'd  like  to  do  an  Accounts  Course.”  Now
normally I would have regarded that as no more realistic than a wish to fly to
the Moon tomorrow. Accounting is one of those tasks I am only too happy to
leave up to someone else, and suddenly, I was becoming interested in it! Such
newfound  interests,  particularly  in  subjects  that  you  have  accepted  that  you
dislike or are uninterested in, can be likened to a small flame (symbolized by
the Ace of Wands in Tarot) that could easily burn out again if smothered or
ignored.  The  trick  is  to  recognize  that  you  are  standing  at  a  crossroads—a
threshold of change. This recognition is the key to all initiations. Again, the
A PIE formula is of use:

ASSESS

Stop. Look around you and assess your situation. Examine all possibilities
for future action—there will always be more pathways available than is at
first  immediately  obvious.  What  possible  futures  can  you  jump  into?  Use
any technique that will gather useful information—options lists, divination,
dream-oracles  or  asking  your  favorite  deity.  Often,  all  you  have  to  do  is
open yourself to become vulnerable to the forces of Change.

PLAN

Once you have chosen a course of action—plan what you need to do. What
resources  do  you  need?  These  may  be  material,  magical,  financial  and
perhaps most importantly, the support of other people. Be prepared to carry
your plan onwards.

IMPLEMENT

This is the hardest thing of all—to do what must be done. Often, fear will
intervene  at  this  stage.  Be  prepared  to  look  at  your  motivations  for  not
continuing upon your chosen course. Unacknowledged fears often take the
form  of  inertia  and  laziness.  Each  step  forwards  gives  further  momentum
to  the  next  effort.  Each  barrier  breached  releases  a  rush  of  pleasure  and
freedom.

EVALUATE


background image

This  is  the  stage  of  assimilation—not  merely  the  practice  of  writing  up
one's  magical  record,  but  being  able  to  look  back  at  your  course  through
the initiatory period and realize what happened and how you dealt with it.
Have you learned any important lessons? The value of such experience is
to make knowledge flesh—assimilating experience until it seems perfectly
simple and natural.

GETTING THE FEAR

A key to understanding initiatory states is that they bring with them varying
degrees  of  fear.  One  of  the  characteristics  of  Macroscopic  Initiations  is  that
suddenly, our current repertoire of coping strategies are useless. If something
into  which  we  have  invested  a  good  deal  of  emotional  commitment  and
selfesteem is directly threatened or removed, and we are placed in a position
of being unable to do anything about this, fear is often the dominant emotion.

Fear  is  the  bodily  gnosis  which  reinforces  any  emotional  and  cognitive
patterns which serve us to hold change at bay. Fear is basically an excitatory
state—the  fight/flight  reflex  of  the  Autonomic  Nervous  System  firing  up.
Using  the  Emotional  Engineering  techniques  described  in  the  previous
chapter, you can deconstruct fear into excitement, which can then be used to
gather  momentum  for  moving  over  a  threshold  into  change,  rather  than
reinforcing your own resistance.

RELAX INTO FEAR

This is a process of orienting yourself so that you are sufficiently open to all
the different possibilities that each moment of experience offers—enmeshed
in the world in an attitude of receptive wonder. This is the knowledge that at
any  time,  without  warning,  any  life  event  could  spin  you  sideways  into
Illumination. The sudden-ness of such an experience is one of the underlying
themes  encapsulated  in  the  Great  God  Pan.  Pan  represents  creative
derangement,  the  possibility  of  moving  from  one  state  to  another,  from
ordinary  perception  to  divine  inspiration.  Pan  can  leap  upon  you  any  time,
any place with the sudden realization that everything is alive and significant.
In such an experience, physical arousal is a strength, rather than a weakness.
Allowing yourself to be vulnerable to the possibility of change means letting
into your life wild magic and the power of surprises. Initiatory states often tip


background image

us into mental entropy and confusion, and this is a good time to free yourself
from  the  bonds  of  the  Past  and  the  fetters  of  anticipated  futures,  and  live  in
the  now  of  your  physical  presence.  Transform  fear  into  wonder  and  open
yourself  to  new  possibilities.  Transform  fear  into  fuel  and  examine  the
thresholds and personal demons which hinder movement. This state is a form
of ecstasy—a word which means “away from stillness,” implying some kind
of agitation.

SAHAJA

Sahaja is a Sanskrit word that can be translated as “spontaneity.” If you can
learn  to  relax  within  initiatory  periods,  abandoning  all  set  routines  and
learned  responses,  you  can  act  with  a  greater  degree  of  freedom.  Periods  of
initiation can be looked upon as windows of opportunity for major work upon
yourself.  So  what  kinds  of  techniques  are  appropriate  here?  Anything  that
enables you to make shifts in your Achievable Reality threshold. Procedures
borrowed from NLP, Vivation, Bioenergetics or the various psychotherapies
might  prove  useful  here.  What  you  should  bear  in  mind  is  that  recognition
that  you  are  entering  a  threshold  of  change  is  all-important.  It  is  difficult  to
intentionally  propel  yourself  into  such  states,  particularly  as  at  some  point
during the experience, it is necessary to surrender control.

Death  by  dismemberment  is  a  strongly  recurrent  theme  in
shamanic cultures, where protoshamans are stripped of their
flesh and torn apart by spirits, only to be remade anew.

The initiatory crisis tends to drive home (often very forcefully) the awareness
of  the  fragility  of  day-today  experiences,  and  of  the  hidden  complexity
behind  that  which  we  have  taken  for  granted  as  normal.  We  have  become
addicted to a “sameness” of experience, and thus have difficulty coping with
novelty or change. Hence the tendency, when faced with a crisis, to rely on
learned  habits,  rather  than  actually  observing  the  situation.  Conversely,  the
magician  has  to  recognize  that  there  may  well  be  an  abyss  around  every
corner, and that what rushes full-tilt at us must be faced head-on. In time, you
will come to recognize that you have your own personal cycles of initiation—
peaks,  troughs  and  plateaus;  you  may  well  come  to  recognize  that  you  are
about to enter an initiatory period, and brace yourself accordingly.

INNERWORLD CONFRONTATIONS


background image

Many world myths feature the descent into the Underworld as a central theme
for  transformation  and  the  quest  for  power  and  mastery  of  self.  The
recognition of the necessity of “rites of passage” is played out both in tribal
societies  where  the  death  of  childhood  and  the  rebirth  into  adulthood  is
marked  by  a  rite  of  passing,  and  in  Western  magical  and  religious  societies
where “followers” are reborn into a new selfdom. Death by dismemberment
is a strongly recurrent theme in shamanic cultures, where proto-shamans are
stripped  of  their  flesh  and  torn  apart  by  spirits,  only  to  be  remade  anew,
usually with some additional part, such as an extra bone, organ, or crystal as
an  indication  that  they  are  now  something  “more”  than  previously.  In  some
cultures  (such  as  in  the  Tibetan  Tantric  Chod  ritual),  the  dismemberment
experience  is  a  voluntary  meditation,  whereas  in  others,  it  is  an  involuntary
(though understood) experience.

This  kind  of  transition  is  not  uncommon  in  Western  approaches  to  magical
development,  both  as  a  willed  technique  and  as  a  (seemingly)  spontaneous
experience that results from working within a particular belief-system. I have
for example, been burnt alive in the pyre of Kali, and more recently, had an
eye ripped out by the Morrigan. Periodic descents into the Underworld are a
necessary phase in the cycle of personal development, and are also associated
with depth psychotherapy. According to the Western Esoteric Tradition, one
of  the  key  stages  of  initiatory  confrontation  is  the  encounter  with  “The
Dweller  on  the  Threshold.”  Less  prosaically,  this  phrase  refers  to  the
experience of our understanding of the gulf between the ego's fiction of itself
and our selves as we truly are. This necessitates the acceptance of light into
the  dark  corners  of  the  self,  and  the  acceptance  of  our  shortcomings,  blind
spots  and  personal  weaknesses  as  aspects  of  ourselves  that  we  must  take
responsibility for. The recognition that we are, ultimately, responsible for all
aspects  of  ourselves,  especially  those  bits  which  we  are  loath  to  admit  to
ourselves, is a step that must be taken if the initiatory journey is to proceed. It
is not uncommon for people to remain at this stage for years, or to come back
to it, time and time again. Such ordeals must be worked through, or they will
return to “haunt” us until they are tackled, else they will become “obsessional
complexes” (demons) that will grow until they have power over us. There are
a myriad of techniques—both magical exercises and psychotherapeutic tools
which can be actively used to examine these complexes, but the core of this
ordeal  is  the  beginnings  of  seeing  yourself.  In  shamanic  cultures,  physical
isolation from the tribe is often reinforced by physical ordeals such as fasting,


background image

sleep  deprivation,  and  exposure  to  rigors  of  heat  or  cold—all-powerful
techniques for producing altered states of consciousness.

The initiatory cycle can be likened to a snake sloughing off its skin. So too,
we  must  be  prepared  to  slough  off  old  patterns  of  thought,  belief  (about
ourselves and the world) and behavior that are no longer appropriate for the
new  phase  of  our  development.  As  we  reach  the  initiatory  stage  of  descent
into  the  underworld,  so  we  are  descending  into  the  Deep  Mind,  learning  to
rely on our own intuition about what is right for us, rather than what we have
been  told  is  correct.  As  the  initiatory  process  becomes  more  and  more
intense,  we  reach  a  point  where  we  have  (to  varying  degrees)  isolated
ourselves  from  the  Social  World,  (physically  or  mentally),  and  begun  to
dismember  the  layer  of  our  Personal  World,  so  that  the  Mythic  World
becomes paramount in our consciousness, perhaps in an intensely ‘real’ way
that  it  has  not  been,  beforehand.  When  we  open  up  the  floodgates  of  the
Mythic  World,  we  may  find  that  our  Deep  Mind  “speaks”  to  us  using  what
psychologists call “autosymbolic images”; that is, symbols which reflect the
churnings  within  us.  These  may  well  be  entities  or  spirits  from  magical  or
religious  belief  systems  that  we  have  consciously  assimilated,  or  they  may
arise “spontaneously” from the Deep Mind. These “entities” (whatever their
source)  may  become  the  first  of  our  “allies”  or  guides  through  the  inner
worlds  that  we  have  descended  into.  Accounts  of  shamanic  initiation  often
recount  the  neo-shaman  being  “tested”  in  various  ways  by  spirit  guides  and
helpers,  and,  if  she  or  he  passes  the  testing,  they  become  allies  that  the
shaman can call upon, on returning from the underworld. Not all of the spirits
one  meets  while  undergoing  the  underworld  experience  will  be  helpful  or
benign; some will try to mislead or misdirect you. In this kind of instance you
will  need  to  rely  even  more  on  your  own  “truthsense”  or  discrimination.
Ghosts are notoriously capricious, and an “elder brother” once told me to “be
wary  of  spirits  which  herald  a  false  dawn  under  the  dark  moon.”  Particular
“misguides”  to  watch  out  for  are  the  spirits  who  will  tell  you  that  you  are
“mystically illuminated” beyond a point that anyone else has reached—they
are  “parts”  of  the  ego  attempting  to  save  itself  from  destruction.  You  may
have to “overcome” some of these spirits—not so much by defeating them in
astral  combat,  but  by  recognizing  that  they  have  no  power  over  you—that
you understand their seductions and will not be swayed by them. The danger
here hearkens back to the necessity of attempting to shed light on as many of
your buried complexes as possible—“misguide” spirits will attempt to seduce


background image

you  into  feeding  those  complexes  so  that  you  become  caught  up  in  them.
Spirit guides and helpers usually come in a variety of forms and shapes. Their
messages  may  not  always  be  obvious,  and  may  only  become  clear  with
hindsight—but  then  you  cannot  expect  everything  to  be  handed  to  you  on  a
plate.  It  is  not  unknown  for  spirit  guides  to  put  the  initiate  through  a  pretty
rough  time,  again  to  test  their  “strength,”  as  it  were.  Powerful  spirits  don't
tend  to  “like”  shamans  who  won't  take  chances  or  face  difficulties  and
overcome them. This is a hard time to get through, but if you keep your wits
about  you  and  hang  on  in  there,  then  the  rewards  are  worth  it.  Guides  will
often  show  you  “secret  routes”  through  the  underworld,  and  “places  of
power” there which you can access at a later point. Some Amerind shamanic
traditions involve the shaman descending into the underworld periodically to
learn  the  names  of  spirits  which,  when  brought  out  again,  can  be  placed  in
masks or other ritual objects.

The initiatory cycle can be likened to a snake sloughing off its
skin. So too, we must be prepared to slough off old patterns of
thought,  belief  (about  ourselves  and  the  world)  and  behavior
that  are  no  longer  appropriate  for  the  new  phase  of  our
development.

Another benefit of the “ordeals” stage is Innerworld Mapping—obtaining (or
verifying)  a  symbolic  plan  of  the  connecting  worlds  that  form  the  universe.
Western  occulture  gives  us  conscious  access  to  a  wide  variety  of  universal
route maps, the Tree of Life that appears in many esoteric systems being just
one well-known example. Western-derived maps seem to have a tendency to
become  very  complicated  very  quickly—perhaps  this  reflects  a  cultural
tendency  to  try  and  label  everything  neatly  away.  The  interesting  (and
intriguing)  thing  about  using  innerworld  maps  is  that  you  can  metaprogram
your Deep Mind to accept a number of different maps—images and symbols
will  arise  accordingly.  Our  “tradition”  for  receiving  innerworld  maps  (and
indeed,  any  other  esoteric  teaching)  is  largely  through  the  written  word,
rather than oral teaching or the psychoactively inspired communion with the
tribal  meme-pool  which  are  the  most  common  routes  for  shamans.  But  it  is
worth remembering that all the different inneruvorld maps had to come from
somewhere,  and  the  most  likely  source  would  seem  to  be  the  initiatory
ordeals  of  very  early  shamans,  which  eventually  became  condensed  into
definite structures.


background image

ILLUMINATION

The  “peak”  of  the  initiation  experience  is  that  of  death/rebirth,  and
subsequent “illumination.” That such an experience is common to all mystery
religions, magical systems and many secular movements indicates that it may
well be one of the essential manifestations of the process of change within the
human  psyche.  Illumination  is  the  much-desired  goal  for  which  many
thousands  of  people  worldwide  have  employed  different  psycho-
technologies,  and  developed  their  own  psychocosms.  Illumination  has  also
been  linked  with  the  use  of  LSD  and  similar  drugs,  and  perhaps  most
mysteriously of all, it can occur seemingly spontaneously to people who have
no  knowledge  or  expectation  of  it.  What  characterizes  an  experience  of
illumination? Some of the prevalent factors are:

1.  A sense of unity—a fading of the self-other divide
2.  Transcendence of space and time as barriers to experience
3.  Positive sensations
4.  A sense of the numinous
5.  A sense of certitude—the “realness” of the experience
6.  Paradoxical insights
7.  Transience—the experience does not last
8.  Resultant change in attitude and behavior.

In neurological terms such experiences represent a reorganizing of activity in
the  brain  as  a  whole.  The  loss  of  ego  boundary  and  the  involvement  of  all
senses  suggests  that  the  Reticular  Formation  is  being  influenced  so  that  the
processes  which  normally  convey  a  sense  of  being  rooted  in  space-time  are
momentarily  inhibited.  The  “floating”  sensation  often  associated  with  astral
projection and other such phenomena suggests that the Limbic system of the
brain  stem  (which  processes  proprioceptive  information  about  the  body's
location in space) is also acting in an unusual mode.

The basis of this idea is that the movement of energy through
a  system  causes  fluctuations  which,  if  they  reach  a  critical
level (i.e., a catastrophe cusp point) develop novel interactions
until a new whole is produced.

What  are  the  fruits  of  this  experience—the  insights,  perceptions  and
messages  brought  back  down  to  earth  by  the  illuminate?  Evolution  of


background image

consciousness, by such means, could well be an important survival program
—a  way  of  going  beyond  the  information  given—a  way  of  learning  how  to
modify the human biosystem via the environment. Ilya Prigognine's theory of
“dissipative  structures”  shows  how  the  very  instability  of  open  systems
allows  them  to  be  self-transforming.  The  basis  of  this  idea  is  that  the
movement  of  energy  through  a  system  causes  fluctuations  which,  if  they
reach a critical level (i.e., a catastrophe cusp point) develop novel interactions
until a new whole is produced. The system then reorganizes itself into a new
“higher order” which is more integrated than the previous system, requires a
greater amount of energy to maintain itself, and is further disposed to future
transformation.  This  can  equally  apply  to  neurological  evolution,  using  a
psycho-technology  (ancient  or  modern)  as  the  tool  for  change.  The  core
stages of the process appear to be:

1.  Change
2.  Crisis
3.  Transcendence
4.  Transformation
5.  Predisposition to further change.

Also,  the  term  “illumination”  is  itself  significant.  Visions  of  light  that
suddenly  burst  forth  upon  the  individual  are  well  documented  from  a  wide
variety of sources, from shamanic travelers to St. Paul; acid trippers to people
who seemingly have the experience spontaneously. Similarly, the experience
of  being  “born-again”  is  central  to  shamanism,  religions  and  magical
systems.  One's  old  self  dies,  and  a  new  one  is  reborn  from  the  shattered
patterns and perceptions. This is well understood in cultures where there is a
single  predominant  Mythic  reality.  Death-rebirth  is  the  key  to  shamanic
development,  and  many  shamanic  cultures  interpret  the  experience  quite
literally,  rather  than  metaphorically.  Western  psychologists  are  only  just
beginning to understand the benefits of such an experience. What is clear is
that  for  many  people  who  undergo  it,  the  experience  is  unsettling  and
disturbing,  especially  when  there  is  no  dominant  cultural  backdrop  with
which  to  explain  or  understand  the  process.  A  good  example  to  look  at
(which  always  raises  hackles  in  some  quarters)  is  the  LSD  death-rebirth
experience. Some Western “authorities” on spiritual practice hold that drug-
induced  experiences  are  somehow  not  as  valid  as  ones  triggered  by


background image

“spiritual”  practices.  Fortunately,  this  somewhat  blinkered  view  is  receding
as  more  information  about  the  role  played  by  psychoactive  substances  in
shamanic training is brought to light. The positive benefits of LSD have been
widely  proclaimed  by  people  as  diverse  as  Aldous  Huxley,  Timothy  Leary,
and  Stanislav  Grof,  all  of  whom  also  stressed  that  acid  should  be  used  in
“controlled  conditions,”  rather  than,  as  is  so  often  the  case  today,
indiscriminately.  What  must  be  borne  in  mind  about  LSD  (like  other
psychoactives)  is  that  its  action  and  effects  are  highly  dependent  upon
individual  beliefs  and  expectations,  and  social  conditioning.  Dropping  acid
can lead to lasting change and transformation in a positive sense; equally, it
can lead to individuals uncritically accepting a set of beliefs and patterns that
effectively  wall  them  off  from  further  transformations—witness  the  number
of  burnt-out  acid-heads  who  become  “Born-Again”  evangelicals,  for
instance. It's not so much the experience itself, but how individuals assimilate
it in terms of cultural expectations.

As an example of how this process operates, contrast a proto-shaman against
a member of a postmodern, industrial culture such as is our own. The proto-
shaman  undergoes  death-rebirth,  and,  following  illumination,  is  reborn  into
the role of a practicing shaman, with all its subsequent status affiliations and
expectations.  Would  that  it  were  as  simple  for  Westerners!  Ours  is  a  much
more complex set of social relations than the tribal environment. Though one
might  be  tempted  to  think  of  oneself  as  a  shaman-in-the-making,  it's  a  safe
bet  that  not  everyone  else  is  going  to  accede  that  role  to  you.  It's  tempting,
and entirely understandable to think: “Right, that's it. I'm ‘illuminated’ now—
I've been there, done it, etc.” and sit back on one's laurels, as it were. While
for some of us, one death-rebirth experience alone is enough to jolt us into a
new  stage  of  development;  it's  more  often  the  case  that  what  we  do
afterwards  is  critically  important.  Zero  states  of  having  “made  it”  are  very
seductive, but our conditioning patterns are insidious—creeping back into the
psyche while our minds are occupied elsewhere. The price of transformation
is  eternal  vigilance.  Vigilance  against  being  lulled  back  into  conditioned
beliefs and emotional/mental patterns that we think that we have “overcome.”
Illumination  may  well  be  a  “peak”  in  our  development,  but  it  isn't  the  end
point, by any means. Those undergoing the initiation cycle in the West tend
to  find  that  many  periodic  death-rebirth  experiences  are  necessary,  as  we
reshuffle different “bits” of the psyche with each occurrence. Yet the death-
rebirth  experience  can  bring  about  lasting  benefits,  including  the  alleviation


background image

of  a  wide  variety  of  emotional,  interpersonal,  and  psychosomatic  problems
that hitherto, have resisted orthodox treatment regimes.

I  would  postulate  that  the  death-rebirth  experience  is  an  essential  form  of
adaptive learning, as it is a powerful process of widening our perspectives on
life, our perceptions of the world, and of each other. The illuminatory insight
moves us toward a Holotropic perspective (i.e., of moving towards a whole)
whereby  new  insights  about  self  in  relation  to  the  universe,  and  how  ideas
and concepts synthesize together, can be startlingly perceived. At this kind of
turning point in our lives, we can go beyond what we already know and begin
to manifest new concepts and constructs. We are all capable of the vision—
what we do to realize that vision is equally, in our hands.

Gnosis  is  not  merely  the  act  of  understanding,  it  is
understanding which impels you to act in a certain way. Thus
as you work with magic, so magic works upon you.

GNOSIS

Related  to  the  experience  of  Illumination  is  the  term  Gnosis,  which  can  be
read  on  different  levels.  First,  Gnosis  is  that  “peak”  experience  of  no-mind,
one-pointedness or samadhi which is the high point of any route into magical
trance.  Second,  Gnosis  can  be  understood  as  Knowledge  of  the  Heart—
perceptions  that  are  difficult  to  express  in  language,  yet  can  be  grasped  and
shared. This is the secret language of magic—to grasp the meaning you have
to  go  through  the  experience  first.  Gnosis  is  not  merely  the  act  of
understanding, it is understanding which impels you to act in a certain way.
Thus as you work with magic, so magic works upon you. Such is the nature

of Chaos. 


background image

CHEMOGNOSIS


background image

TRYPTAMINE HALLUCINOGENS AND

CONSCIOUSNESS

TERENCE MCKENNA

A  talk  given  at  the  Lilly/Goswami  Conference  on  Consciousness  and
Quantum Physics at Esalen, December 1983. It appears in print as part of
The Archaic Revival (Harper San Francisco, 1992)

There  is  a  very  circumscribed  place  in  organic  nature  that  has,  I  think,
important  implications  for  students  of  human  nature.  I  refer  to  the
tryptophan-derived  hallucinogens  dimethyltryptamine  (DMT),  psilocybin,
and  a  hybrid  drug  that  is  in  aboriginal  use  in  the  rain  forests  of  South
America, ayahuasca. This latter is a combination of dimethyltryptamine and a
monoamine oxidase inhibitor that is taken orally. It seems appropriate to talk
about  these  drugs  when  we  discuss  the  nature  of  consciousness;  it  is  also
appropriate when we discuss quantum physics.

It is my interpretation that the major quantum mechanical phenomena that we
all  experience,  aside  from  waking  consciousness  itself,  are  dreams  and
hallucinations.  These  states,  at  least  in  the  restricted  sense  that  I  am
concerned  with,  occur  when  the  large  amounts  of  various  sorts  of  radiation
conveyed  into  the  body  by  the  senses  are  restricted.  Then  we  see  interior
images  and  interior  processes  that  are  psychophysical.  These  processes
definitely  arise  at  the  quantum  mechanical  level.  It's  been  shown  by  John
Smythies, Alexander Shulgin, and others that there are quantum mechanical
correlates to hallucinogenesis.  In other words,  if one atom  on the molecular
ring  of  an  inactive  compound  is  moved,  the  compound  becomes  highly
active. To me this is a perfect proof of the dynamic linkage at the formative
level between quantum mechanically described matter and mind.

People have been talking to gods and demons for far more of
human history than they have not.

Hallucinatory  states  can  be  induced  by  a  variety  of  hallucinogens  and


background image

disassociate  anesthetics,  and  by  experiences  like  fasting  and  other  ordeals.
But what makes the tryptamine family of compounds especially interesting is
the  intensity  of  the  hallucinations  and  the  concentration  of  activity  in  the
visual cortex. There is an immense vividness to these interior landscapes, as
if  information  were  being  presented  three-dimensionally  and  deployed
fourth-dimensionally,  coded  as  light  and  as  evolving  surfaces.  When  one
confronts  these  dimensions  one  becomes  part  of  a  dynamic  relationship
relating  to  the  experience  while  trying  to  decode  what  it  is  saying.  This
phenomenon  is  not  new—people  have  been  talking  to  gods  and  demons  for
far more of human history than they have not.

It is only the conceit of the scientific and postindustrial societies that allows
us to even propound some of the questions that we take to be so important.
For  instance,  the  question  of  contact  with  extraterrestrials  is  a  kind  of  red
herring  premised  upon  a  number  of  assumptions  that  a  moment's  reflection
will show are completely false. To search expectantly for a radio signal from
an  extraterrestrial  source  is  probably  as  culture  bound  a  presumption  as  to
search the galaxy for a good Italian restaurant. And yet, this has been chosen
as the avenue by which it is assumed contact is likely to occur. Meanwhile,
there  are  people  all  over  the  world—psychics,  shamans,  mystics,
schizophrenics—whose  heads  are  filled  with  information,  but  it  has  been
ruled  a  priori  irrelevant,  incoherent,  or  mad.  Only  that  which  is  validated
through consensus via certain sanctioned instrumentalities will be accepted as
a  signal.  The  problem  is  that  we  are  so  inundated  by  these  signals—these
other dimensions—that there is a great deal of noise in the circuit.

The  reaction  to  these  voices  is  not  to  kneel  in  genuflection
before a god, because then one will be like Dorothy in her first
encounter with Oz.

It  is  no  great  accomplishment  to  hear  a  voice  in  the  head.  The
accomplishment is to make sure it is telling the truth, because the demons are
of many kinds: “Some are made of ions, some of mind; the ones of ketamine,
you'll find, stutter often and are blind.” The reaction to these voices is not to
kneel in genuflection before a god, because then one will be like Dorothy in
her  first  encounter  with  Oz.  There  is  no  dignity  in  the  universe  unless  we
meet these things on our feet, and that means having an I/Thou relationship.
One say to the Other: “You say you are omniscient, omnipresent, or you say
you are from Zeta Reticuli. You're long on talk, but what can you show me?”


background image

Magicians, people who invoke these things, have always understood that one
must go into such encounters with one's wits about oneself.

What  does  extraterrestrial  communication  have  to  do  with  this  family  of
hallucinogenic  compounds  I  wish  to  discuss?  Simply  this:  that  the  unique
presentational  phenomenology  of  this  family  of  compounds  has  been
overlooked.  Psilocybin,  though  rare,  is  the  best  known  of  these  neglected
substances. Psilocybin, in the minds of the uninformed public and in the eyes
of the law, is lumped together with LSD and mescaline, when in fact each of
these  compounds  is  a  phenomenologically  defined  universe  unto  itself.
Psilocybin  and  DMT  invoke  the  Logos,  although  DMT  is  more  intense  and
more brief in its action. This means that they work directly on the language
centers, so that an important aspect of the experience is the interior dialogue.
As  soon  as  one  discovers  this  about  psilocybin  and  about  tryptamines  in
general, one must decide whether or not to enter into this dialogue and to try
and make sense of the incoming signal. This is what I have attempted.

I  call  myself  an  explorer  rather  than  a  scientist,  because  the  area  that  I'm
looking  at  contains  insufficient  data  to  support  even  the  dream  of  being  a
science.  We  are  in  a  position  comparable  to  that  of  explorers  who  map  one
river and only indicate other rivers flowing into it; we must leave many rivers
unascended and thus can say nothing about them. This Baconian collecting of
data,  with  no  assumptions  about  what  it  might  eventually  yield,  has  pushed
me  to  a  number  of  conclusions  that  I  did  not  anticipate.  Perhaps  through
reminiscence  I  can  explain  what  I  mean,  for  in  this  case  describing  past
experiences raises all of the issues.

I first experimented with DMT in 1965; it was even then a compound rarely
met with. It is surprising how few people are familiar with it, for we live in a
society  that  is  absolutely  obsessed  with  every  kind  of  sensation  imaginable
and that adores every therapy, every intoxication, every sexual configuration,
and all forms of media overload. Yet, however much we may be hedonists or
pursuers  of  the  bizarre,  we  find  DMT  to  be  too  much.  It  is,  as  they  say  in
Spanish,  bastante,  it's  enough—so  much  enough  that  it's  too  much.  Once
smoked, the onset of the experience begins in about fifteen seconds. One falls
immediately into a trance. One's eyes are closed and one hears a sound like
ripping  cellophane,  like  someone  crumpling  up  plastic  film  and  throwing  it
away. A friend of mine suggests this is our radio entelechy ripping out of the
organic  matrix.  An  ascending  tone  is  heard.  Also  present  is  the  normal


background image

hallucinogenic  modality,  a  shifting  geometric  surface  of  migrating  and
changing  colored  forms.  At  the  synaptic  site  of  activity,  all  available  bond
sites are being occupied, and one experiences the mode shift occurring over a
period  of  about  30  seconds.  At  that  point  one  arrives  in  a  place  that  defies
description,  a  space  that  has  a  feeling  of  being  underground,  or  somehow
insulated and domed. In Finnegans Wake such a place is called the “merry go
raum,” from the German word raum, for “space.” The room is actually going
around,  and  in  that  space  one  feels  like  a  child,  though  one  has  come  out
somewhere in eternity.

What  does  extraterrestrial  communication  have  to  do  with
this family of hallucinogenic compounds?

The  tryptamine  Munchkins  come,  these  hyperdimensional
machine-elf entities, and they bathe one in love. It's not erotic
but  it  is  openhearted.  It  certainly  feels  good.  And  they  are
speaking, saying, “Don't be alarmed. Remember, and do what
we are doing.”

The experience always reminds me of the 24th fragment of Heraclitus: “The
Aeon is a child at play with colored balls.” One not only becomes the Aeon at
play with colored balls but meets entities as well. In the book by my brother
and  myself,  The  Invisible  Landscape,  I  describe  them  as  self-transforming
machine  elves
,  for  that  is  how  they  appear.  These  entities  are  dynamically
contorting  topological  modules  that  are  somehow  distinct  from  the
surrounding  background,  which  is  itself  undergoing  a  continuous
transformation. These entities remind me of the scene in the film version of
The Wizard of Oz after the Munchkins come with a death certificate for the
Witch  of  the  East.  They  all  have  very  squeaky  voices  and  they  sing  a  little
song  about  being  “absolutely  and  completely  dead.”  The  tryptamine
Munchkins  come,  these  hyperdimensional  machine-elf  entities,  and  they
bathe one in love. It's not erotic but it is openhearted. It certainly feels good.
These  beings  are  like  fractal  reflections  of  some  previously  hidden  and
suddenly autonomous part of one's own psyche.

And  they  are  speaking,  saying,  “Don't  be  alarmed.  Remember,  and  do  what
we  are  doing.”  One  of  the  interesting  characteristics  of  DMT  is  that  it
sometimes inspires fear—this marks the experience as existentially authentic.
One  of  the  interesting  approaches  to  evaluating  such  a  compound  is  to  see


background image

how eager people are to do it a second time. A touch of terror gives the stamp
of validity to the experience because it means, “This is real.” We are in the
balance.  We  read  the  literature;  we  know  the  maximum  doses,  the  LD-50,
and so on. But nevertheless, so great is one's faith in the mind that when one
is  out  in  it  one  comes  to  feel  that  the  rules  of  pharmacology  do  not  really
apply and that control of existence on that plane is really a matter of focus of
will and good luck.

I'm  not  saying  that  there's  something  intrinsically  good  about  terror.  I'm
saying  that,  granted  the  situation,  if  one  is  not  terrified  then  one  must  be
somewhat out of contact with the full dynamics of what is happening. To not
be terrified means either that one is a fool or that one has taken a compound
that paralyzes the ability to be terrified. I have nothing against hedonism, and
I  certainly  bring  something  out  of  it.  But  the  experience  must  move  one's
heart, and it will not move the heart unless it deals with the issues of life and
death. If it deals with life and death it will move one to fear, it will move one
to tears, it will move one to laughter. These places are profoundly strange and
alien.

The fractal elves seem to be reassuring, saying, “Don't worry, don't worry; do
this,  look  at  this.”  Meanwhile,  one  is  completely  “over  there.”  One's  ego  is
intact.  One's  fear  reflexes  are  intact.  One  is  not  “fuzzed  out”  at  all.
Consequently, the natural reaction is amazement; profound astonishment that
persists  and  persists.  One  breathes  and  it  persists.  The  elves  are  saying,
“Don't get a loop of wonder going that quenches your ability to understand.
Try not to be so amazed. Try to focus and look at what we're doing.” What
they're doing is emitting sounds like music, like language. These sounds pass
without any quantized moment of distinction—as Philo Judaeus said that the
Logos  would  when  it  became  perfect—from  things  heard  to  things  beheld.
One  hears  and  beholds  a  language  of  alien  meaning  that  is  conveying  alien
information that cannot be Englished.

Being  monkeys,  when  we  encounter  a  translinguistic  object,  a  kind  of
cognitive dissonance is set up in our hind-brain. We try to pour language over
it and it sheds it like water off a duck's back. We try again and fail again, and
this  cognitive  dissonance,  this  “wow”  or  “flutter”  that  is  building  off  this
object causes wonder, astonishment and awe at the brink of terror. One must
control that. And the way to control it is to do what the entities are telling one
to do, to do what they are doing.


background image

I mention these “effects” to invite the attention of experimentalists, whether
they  be  shamans  or  scientists.  There  is  something  going  on  with  these
compounds  that  is  not  part  of  the  normal  presentational  spectrum  of
hallucinogenic  drug  experience.  When  one  begins  to  experiment  with  one's
voice,  unanticipated  phenomena  become  possible.  One  experiences
glossolalia,  although  unlike  classical  glossolalia,  which  has  been  studied.
Students  of  classical  glossolalia  have  measured  pools  of  saliva  eighteen
inches  across  on  the  floors  of  South  American  churches  where  people  have
been  kneeling.  After  classical  glossolalia  has  occurred,  the  glossolaliasts
often  turn  to  ask  the  people  nearby,  “Did  I  do  it?  Did  I  speak  in  tongues?”
This hallucinogen induced phenomenon isn't like that; it's simply a brain state
that  allows  the  expression  of  the  assembly  language  that  lies  behind
language,  or  a  primal  language  of  the  sort  that  Robert  Graves  discussed  in
The White Goddess, or a  Qabalistic language of  the sort that  is described in
the Zohar, a primal “ur sprach” that comes out of oneself. One discovers one
can  make  the  extradimensional  objects—the  feeling-toned,  meaning-toned,
three-dimensional  rotating  complexes  of  transforming  light  and  color.  To
know  this  is  to  feel  like  a  child.  One  is  playing  with  colored  balls;  one  has
become the Aeon.

This happened to me 20 seconds after I smoked DMT on a particular day in
1966.  I  was  appalled.  Until  then  I  had  thought  that  I  had  my  ontological
categories intact. I had taken LSD before, yet this thing came upon me like a
bolt from the blue. I came down and said (and I said it many times), “I cannot
believe  this;  this  is  impossible,  this  is  completely  impossible.”  There  was  a
declension of gnosis that proved to me in a moment that right here and now,
one  quanta  away,  there  is  raging  a  universe  of  active  intelligence  that  is
transhuman, \hyperdimensional, and extremely alien. I call it the Logos, and I
make no judgments about it. I constantly engage it in dialogue, saying, “Well,
what  are  you?  Are  you  some  kind  of  diffuse  consciousness  that  is  in  the
ecosystem of the Earth? Are you a god or an extraterrestrial? Show me what
you know.”

The psilocybin mushrooms also convey one into the world of the tryptamine
hypercontinuum.  Indeed,  psilocybin  is  a  psychoactive  tryptamine.  The
mushroom is full of answers to the questions raised by its own presence. The
true history of the galaxy over the last four and a half billion years is trivial to
it.  One  can  access  images  of  cosmological  history.  Such  experiences


background image

naturally raise the question of independent validation—at least for a time this
was  my  question.  But  as  I  became  more  familiar  with  the  epistemological
assumptions  of  modern  science,  I  slowly  realized  that  the  structure  of  the
Western  intellectual  enterprise  is  so  flimsy  at  the  center  that  apparently  no
one knows anything with certitude. It was then that I became less reluctant to
talk  about  these  experiences.  They  are  experiences,  and  as  such  they  are
primary  data  for  being.  This  dimension  is  not  remote,  and  yet  it  is  so
unspeakably  bizarre  that  it  casts  into  doubt  all  of  humanity's  historical
assumptions.

The psilocybin mushrooms do the same things that DMT does, although the
experience  builds  up  over  an  hour  and  is  sustained  for  a  couple  of  hours.
There  is  the  same  confrontation  with  an  alien  intelligence  and  extremely
bizarre  translinguistic  information  complexes.  These  experiences  strongly
suggest that there is some latent ability of the human brain/body that has yet
to  be  discovered;  yet,  once  discovered,  it  will  be  so  obvious  that  it  will  fall
right  into  the  mainstream  of  cultural  evolution.  It  seems  to  me  that  either
language  is  the  shadow  of  this  ability  or  that  this  ability  will  be  a  further
extension  of  language.  Perhaps  a  human  language  is  possible  in  which  the
intent  of  meaning  is  actually  beheld  in  three-dimensional  space.  If  this  can
happen on DMT, it means it is at least, under some circumstances, accessible
to human beings. Given 10,000 years and high cultural involvement in such a
talent, does anyone doubt that it could become a cultural convenience in the
same way that mathematics or language has become a cultural convenience?

One  of  the  interesting  characteristics  of  DMT  is  that  it
sometimes  inspires  fear-this  marks  the  experience  as
existentially  authentic.  A  touch  of  terror  gives  the  stamp  of
validity to the experience because it means, “This is real.”

Naturally, as a result of the confrontation of alien intelligence with organized
intellect  on  the  other  side,  many  theories  have  been  elaborated.  The  theory
that I put forth in Psilocybin: The Magic Mushroom Grower's Guide, held the
Stropharia  cubensis  mushroom  was  a  species  that  did  not  evolve  on  earth.
Within the mushroom trance, I was informed that once a culture has complete
understanding of its genetic information, it reengineers itself for survival. The
Stropharia  cubensis  mushroom's  version  of  reengineering  is  a  mycelial
network  strategy  when  in  contact  with  planetary  surfaces  and  a  spore-
dispersion  strategy  as  a  means  of  radiating  throughout  the  galaxy.  And,


background image

though  I  am  troubled  by  how  freely  Bell's  nonlocality  theorem  is  tossed
around,  nevertheless  the  alien  intellect  on  the  other  side  does  seem  to  be  in
possession  in  a  huge  body  of  information  drawn  from  the  history  of  the
galaxy.  It/they  say  that  there  is  nothing  unusual  about  this,  that  humanity's
conceptions of organized intelligence and the dispersion of life in the galaxy
are  hopelessly  culture-bound,  that  the  galaxy  has  been  an  organized  society
for  billions  of  years.  Life  evolves  under  so  many  different  regimens  of
chemistry,  temperature,  and  pressure,  that  searching  for  an  extraterrestrial
who will sit down and have a conversation with you is doomed to failure. The
main problem with searching for extraterrestrials is to recognize them. Time
is  so  vast  and  evolutionary  strategies  and  environments  so  varied  that  the
trick  is  to  know  that  contact  is  being  made  at  all.  The  Stropharia  cubensis
mushroom, if one can believe what it says in one of its moods, is a symbiote,
and  it  desires  ever-deeper  symbiosis  with  the  human  species.  It  achieved
symbiosis  with  human  society  early  by  associating  itself  with  domesticated
cattle  and  through  them  human  nomads.  Like  the  plants  men  and  women
grew  and  the  animals  they  husbanded,  the  mushroom  was  able  to  inculcate
itself  into  the  human  family,  so  that  where  human  genes  went  these  other
genes would be carried.

Philip  K.  Dick,  in  one  of  his  last  novels,  Valis,  discusses  the
long  hibernation  of  the  Logos.  A  creature  of  pure
information,  it  was  buried  in  the  ground  at  Nag  Hammadi,
along with the burying of the Chenoboskion Library circa 370
AD.

But the classic mushroom cults of Mexico were destroyed by the coming of
the  Spanish  conquest.  The  Franciscans  assumed  they  had  an  absolute
monopoly on theophagy, the eating of God; yet in the New World they came
upon people calling a mushroom teonanacatl, the flesh of the gods. They set
to  work,  and  the  Inquisition  was  able  to  push  the  old  religion  into  the
mountains  of  Oaxaca  so  that  it  only  survived  in  a  few  villages  when
Valentina and Gordon Wasson found it there in the 1950s.

There is another metaphor. One must balance these explanations. Now I shall
sound as if I didn't think the mushroom is an extraterrestrial. It may instead
be  what  I've  recently  come  to  suspect—that  the  human  soul  is  so  alienated
from us in our present culture that we treat it as an extraterrestrial. To us the
most  alien  thing  in  the  cosmos  is  the  human  soul.  Aliens  Hollywood-style


background image

could  arrive  on  earth  tomorrow  and  the  DMT  trance  would  remain  more
weird  and  continue  to  hold  more  promise  for  useful  information  for  the
human  future.  It  is  that  intense.  Ignorance  forced  the  mushroom  cult  into
hiding.  Ignorance  burned  the  libraries  of  the  Hellenistic  world  at  an  earlier
period  and  dispersed  the  ancient  knowledge,  shattering  the  stellar  and
astronomical machinery that had been the work of centuries. By ignorance I
mean  the  Hellenistic-Christian-Judaic  tradition.  The  inheritors  of  this
tradition  built  a  triumph  of  mechanism.  It  was  they  who  later  realized  the
alchemical  dreams  of  the  15th  and  16th  centuries—and  the  20th  century—
with  the  transformation  of  elements  and  the  discovery  of  gene  transplants.
But then, having conquered the New World and driven its people into cultural
fragmentation and diaspora, they came unexpectedly upon the body of Osiris
—the condensed body of Eros—in the mountains of Mexico where Eros has
retreated at the coming of the Christos. And by finding the mushroom, they
unleashed it.

Philip K. Dick, in one of his last novels, Valis, discusses the long hibernation
of the Logos. A creature of pure information, it was buried in the ground at
Nag  Hammadi,  along  with  the  burying  of  the  Chenoboskion  Library  circa
370  AD.  As  static  information,  it  existed  there  until  1947,  when  the  texts
were  translated  and  read.  As  soon  as  people  had  the  information  in  their
minds, the symbiote came alive, for, like the mushroom consciousness, Dick
imagined it to be a thing of pure information. The mushroom consciousness
is the consciousness of the Other in hyperspace, which means in dream and
in  the  psilocybin  trance,  at  the  quantum  foundation  of  being,  in  the  human
future,  and  after  death.  All  of  these  places  that  were  thought  to  be  discrete
and  separate  are  seen  to  be  part  of  a  single  continuum.  History  is  the  dash
over  10-15,000  years  from  nomadism  to  flying  saucer,  hopefully  without
ripping the envelope of the planet so badly that the birth is aborted and fails,
and we remain brutish prisoners of matter.

History  is  the  shockwave  of  eschatology.  Something  is  at  the
end  of  time  and  is  casting  an  enormous  shadow  over  human
history, drawing all human becoming toward it.

History is the shockwave of eschatology. Something is at the end of time and
is  casting  an  enormous  shadow  over  human  history,  drawing  all  human
becoming  toward  it.  All  the  wars,  the  philosophies,  the  rapes,  the  pillaging,
the  migrations,  the  cities,  the  civilizations—all  of  this  is  occupying  a


background image

microsecond of geological, planetary, and galactic time as the monkeys react
to  the  symbiote,  which  is  in  the  environment  and  which  is  feeding
information  to  humanity  about  the  larger  picture.  I  do  not  belong  to  the
school that wants to attribute all of our accomplishments to knowledge given
to us as a gift from friendly aliens—I'm describing something I hope is more
profound  than  that.  As  nervous  systems  evolve  to  higher  and  higher  levels,
they come more and more to understand the true situation in which they are
embedded, and the true situation in which we are embedded is an organism,
an organization of intelligence on a galactic scale. Science and mathematics
may  be  culture-bound.  We  cannot  know  for  sure,  because  we  have  never
dealt with an alien mathematics or an alien culture except in the occult realm,
and  that  evidence  is  inadmissible  by  the  guardians  of  scientific  truth.  This
means  that  the  contents  of  shamanic  experience  and  of  plant-induced
ecstasies are inadmissible even though they are the source of novelty and the
cutting edge of the ingression of the novel into the plenum of being.

Think about this for a moment: If the human mind does not loom large in the
coming history of the human race, then what is to become of us? The future
is  bound  to  be  psychedelic,  because  the  future  belongs  to  the  mind.  We  are
just  beginning  to  push  the  buttons  on  the  mind.  Once  we  take  a  serious
engineering  approach  to  this,  we  are  going  to  discover  the  plasticity,  the
mutability,  the  eternal  nature  of  the  mind  and,  I  believe,  release  it  from  the
monkey.  My  vision  of  the  final  human  future  is  an  effort  to  exteriorize  the
soul  and  internalize  the  body,  so  that  the  exterior  soul  will  exist  as  a
superconducting  lens  of  translinguistic  matter  generated  out  of  the  body  of
each  of  us  at  a  critical  juncture  at  our  psychedelic  bar  mitzvah.  From  that
point  on,  we  will  be  eternal  somewhere  in  the  solid-state  matrix  of  the
translinguistic  lens  we  have  become.  One's  body  image  will  exist  as  a
holographic wave transform while one is at play in the fields of the Lord and
living in Elysium.

Other  intelligent  monkeys  have  walked  this  planet.  We  exterminated  them
and so now we are unique, but what is loose on this planet is language, self-
replicating  information  systems  that  reflect  functions  of  DNA:  learning,
coding,  templating,  recording,  testing,  retesting,  recoding  against  DNA
functions.  Then  again,  language  may  be  a  quality  of  an  entirely  different
order. Whatever language is, it is in us monkeys now and moving through us
and  moving  out  of  our  hands  and  into  the  noosphere  with  which  we  have


background image

surrounded ourselves.

The  tryptamine  state  seems  to  be  in  one  sense  transtemporal;  it  is  an
anticipation  of  the  future,  it  is  as  though  Plato's  metaphor  were  true—that
time  IS  the  moving  image  of  eternity.  The  tryptamine  ecstasy  is  a  stepping
out of the moving image and into eternity, the eternity of the standing now,
the nunc stans of Thomas Aquinas. In that state, all of human history is seen
to  lead  toward  this  culminating  moment.  Acceleration  is  visible  in  all  the
processes  around  us:  the  fact  that  fire  was  discovered  several  million  years
ago; language came perhaps 35,000 years ago; measurement, 5,000; Galileo,
400;  then  Watson-Crick  and  DNA.  What  is  obviously  happening  is  that
everything  is  being  drawn  together.  On  the  other  hand,  the  description  our
physicists  are  giving  us  of  the  universe—that  it  has  lasted  billions  of  years
and  will  last  billions  of  years  into  the  future—is  a  dualistic  conception,  an
inductive projection that is very unsophisticated when applied to the nature of
consciousness and language. Consciousness is somehow able to collapse the
state  vector  and  thereby  cause  the  stuff  of  being  to  undergo  what  Alfred
North  Whitehead  called  “the  formality  of  actually  occurring.”  Here  is  the
beginning  of  an  understanding  of  the  centrality  of  human  beings.  Western
societies have been on a decentralizing bender for 500 years, concluding that
the Earth is not the center of the universe and man is not the beloved of God.
We have moved ourselves out toward the edge of the galaxy, when the fact is
that the most richly organized material in the universe is the human cerebral
cortex,  and  the  densest  and  richest  experience  in  the  universe  is  the
experience  you  are  having  right  now.  Everything  should  be  constellated
outward from the perceiving self. That is the primary datum.

Think  about  this  for  a  moment:  If  the  human  mind  does  not
loom large in the coming history of the human race, then what
is  to  become  of  us?  The  future  is  bound  to  be  psychedelic,
because the future belongs to the mind.

The  perceiving  self  under  the  influence  of  these  hallucinogenic  plants  gives
information  that  is  totally  at  variance  with  the  models  that  we  inherit  from
our past, yet these dimensions exist. On one level, this information is a matter
of  no  great  consequence,  for  many  cultures  have  understood  this  for
millennia. But we moderns are so grotesquely alienated and taken out of what
life  is  about  that  to  us  it  comes  as  a  revelation.  Without  psychedelics  the
closest we can get to the Mystery is to try to feel in some abstract mode the


background image

power  of  myth  or  ritual.  This  grasping  is  a  very  over  intellectualized  and
unsatisfying sort of process.

As I said, I am an explorer, not a scientist. If I were unique, then none of my
conclusions  would  have  any  meaning  outside  the  context  of  myself.  My
experiences, like yours, have to be more or less part of the human condition.
Some  may  have  more  facility  for  such  exploration  than  others,  and  these
states may be difficult to achieve, but they are part of the human condition.
There  are  few  clues  that  these  extradimensional  places  exist.  If  art  carries
images  out  of  the  Other  from  the  Logos  to  the  world—drawing  ideas  down
into  matter—why  is  human  art  history  so  devoid  of  what  psychedelic
voyagers  have  experienced  so  totally?  Perhaps  the  flying  saucer  or  UFO  is
the central motif to be understood in order to get a handle on reality here and
now.  We  are  alienated,  so  alienated  that  the  self  must  disguise  itself  as  an
extraterrestrial in order not to alarm us with the truly bizarre dimensions that
it encompasses. When we can love the alien, then we will have begun to heal
the psychic discontinuity that has plagued us since at least the 16th century,
possibly earlier.

My  testimony  is  that  magic  is  alive  in  hyperspace.  It  is  not  necessary  to
believe me, only to form a relationship with these hallucinogenic plants. The
fact is that the gnosis comes from plants. There is some certainty that one is
dealing with a creature of integrity if one deals with a plant, but the creatures
born in the demonic artifice of laboratories have to be dealt with very, very
carefully. DMT is an endogenous hallucinogen. It is present in small amounts
in the human brain. Also it is important that psilocybin is 4-phosphoraloxy-N,
N-dimethyltryptamine  and  that  serotonin,  the  major  neurotransmitter  in  the
human  brain,  found  in  all  life  and  most  concentrated  in  humans,  is  5-
hydroxytryptamine. The very fact that the onset of DMT is so rapid, coming
on in 45 seconds and lasting five minutes, means that the brain is absolutely
at home with this compound. On the other hand, a hallucinogen like LSD is
retained in the body for some time.

Magic is alive in hyperspace. It is not necessary to believe me,
only to form a relationship with these hallucinogenic plants.

I  will  add  a  cautionary  note.  I  always  feel  odd  telling  people  to  verify  my
observations  since  the  sine  qua  non  is  the  hallucinogenic  plant.
Experimenters should be very careful. One must build up to the experience.


background image

These are bizarre dimensions of extraordinary power and beauty. There is no
set rule to avoid being overwhelmed, but move carefully, reflect a great deal,
and always try to map experiences back onto the history of the race and the
philosophical  and  religious  accomplishments  of  the  species.  All  the
compounds are potentially dangerous, and all compounds, at sufficient doses
or repeated over time, involve risks. The library is the first place to go when
looking into taking a new compound.

We  need  all  the  information  available  to  navigate  dimensions  that  are
profoundly  strange  and  alien.  I  have  been  to  Konarak  and  visited
Bubaneshwar.  I'm  familiar  with  Hindu  iconography  and  have  collected
thankas. I saw similarities between my LSD experiences and the iconography
of  Mahayana  Buddhism.  In  fact,  it  was  LSD  experiences  that  drove  me  to
collect  Mahayana  art.  But  what  amazed  me  was  the  total  absence  of  the
motifs of DMT. It is not there; it is not there in any tradition familiar to me.

There is a very interesting story by Jorge Luis Borges called “The Sect of the
Phoenix.”  Allow  me  to  recapitulate.  Borges  starts  out  by  writing:  “There  is
no human group in which members of the sect do not appear. It is also true
that there is no persecution or rigor they have not suffered and perpetrated.”
He continues,

The rite is the only religious practice observed by the sectarians. The
rite  constitutes  the  Secret.  This  Secret  ...  is  transmitted  from
generation  to  generation.  The  act  in  itself  is  trivial,  momentary,  and
requires no description. The Secret is sacred, but is always somewhat
ridiculous; its performance is furtive and the adept do not speak of it.
There  are  no  decent  words  to  name  it,  but  it  is  understood  that  all
words name it or rather inevitably allude to it.

Borges  never  explicitly  says  what  the  Secret  is,  but  if  one  knows  his  other
story, “The Aleph,” one can put these two together and realize that the Aleph
is the experience of the Secret of the Cult of the Phoenix.

In  the  Amazon,  when  the  mushroom  was  revealing  its  information  and
deputizing  us  to  do  various  things,  we  asked,  “Why  us?  Why  should  we  be
the  ambassadors  of  an  alien  species  into  human  culture?”  And  it  answered,
“Because you did not believe in anything. Because you have never given over
your belief to anyone.” The sect of the phoenix, the cult of this experience, is
perhaps  millennia  old,  but  it  has  not  yet  been  brought  to  light  where  the


background image

historical threads may run. The prehistoric use of ecstatic plants on this planet
is  not  well  understood.  Until  recently,  psilocybin  mushroom  taking  was
confined to the central isthmus of Mexico. The psilocybin-containing species
Stropharia  cubensis  is  not  known  to  be  in  archaic  use  in  a  shamanic  rite
anywhere  in  the  world.  DMT  is  used  in  the  Amazon  and  has  been  for
millennia, but by cultures quite primitive—usually nomadic hunter-gatherers.

I  am  baffled  by  what  I  call  “the  black  hole  effect”  that  seems  to  surround
DMT. A black hole causes a curvature of space such that no light can leave it,
and,  since  no  signal  can  leave  it,  no  information  can  leave  it.  Let  us  leave
aside  the  issue  of  whether  this  is  true  in  practice  of  spinning  black  holes.
Think of it as a metaphor. Metaphorically, DMT is like an intellectual black
hole in that once one knows about it, it is very hard for others to understand
what  one  is  talking  about.  One  cannot  be  heard.  The  more  one  is  able  to
articulate what it is, the less others are able to understand. This is why I think
people who attain enlightenment, if we may for a moment comap these two
things,  are  silent.  They  are  silent  because  we  cannot  understand  them.  Why
the  phenomenon  of  tryptamine  ecstasy  has  not  been  looked  at  by  scientists,
thrill  seekers,  or  anyone  else,  I  am  not  sure,  but  I  recommend  it  to  your
attention.

The  tragedy  of  our  cultural  situation  is  that  we  have  no  shamanic  tradition.
Shamanism  is  primarily  techniques,  not  ritual.  It  is  a  set  of  techniques  that
have  been  worked  out  over  millennia  that  make  it  possible,  though  perhaps
not  for  everyone,  to  explore  these  areas.  People  of  predilection  are  noticed
and encouraged.

In  archaic  societies  where  shamanism  is  a  thriving  institution,  the  signs  are
fairly easy to recognize: oddness or uniqueness in an individual. Epilepsy is
often a signature in preliterate societies, or survival of an unusual ordeal in an
unexpected  way.  For  instance,  people  who  are  struck  by  lightning  and  live
are  thought  to  make  excellent  shamans.  People  who  nearly  die  of  a  disease
and fight their way back to health after weeks and weeks of an indeterminate
zone  are  thought  to  have  strength  of  soul.  Among  aspiring  shamans  there
must be some sign of inner strength or a hypersensitivity to trance states. In
traveling  around  the  world  and  dealing  with  shamans,  I  find  the
distinguishing  characteristic  is  an  extraordinary  centeredness.  Usually  the
shaman is an intellectual and is alienated from society. A good shaman sees
exactly who you are and says, “Ah, here's somebody to have a conversation


background image

with.”  The  anthropological  literature  always  presents  shamans  as  embedded
in  a  tradition,  but  once  one  gets  to  know  them  they  are  always  very
sophisticated about what they are doing. They are the true phenomenologists
of  this  world;  they  know  plant  chemistry,  yet  they  call  these  energy  fields
“spirits.”  We  hear  the  word  “spirits”  through  a  series  of  narrowing
declensions  of  meaning  that  are  worse  almost  than  not  understanding.
Shamans  speak  of  “spirit”  the  way  a  quantum  physicist  might  speak  of
“charm”; it is a technical gloss for a very complicated concept.

There  is  no  human  group  in  which  members  of  the  sect  do
not appear. It is also true that there is no persecution or rigor
they  have  not  suffered  and  perpetrated.”  -Jorge  Luis  Borges
in “The Sect of the Phoenix”

It  is  possible  that  there  are  shamanic  family  lines,  at  least  in  the  case  of
hallucinogen-using  shamans,  because  shamanic  ability  is  to  some  degree
determined  by  how  many  active  receptor  sites  occur  in  the  brain,  thus
facilitating  these  experiences.  Some  claim  to  have  these  experiences
naturally,  but  I  am  underwhelmed  by  the  evidence  that  this  is  so.  What  it
comes down to for me is “What can you show me?”

I always ask that question; finally in the Amazon, informants said, “Let's take
our machetes and hike out here half a mile and get some vine and boil it up
and we will show you what we can show you.”

Let us be clear. People die in these societies that I'm talking about all the time
and for all kinds of reasons. Death is really much more among them than it is
in  our  society.  Those  who  have  epilepsy  who  don't  die  are  brought  to  the
attention  of  the  shaman  and  trained  in  breathing  and  plant  usage  and  other
things—the fact is that we don't really know all of what goes on. These secret
information systems have not been well studied. Shamanism is not, in these
traditional  societies,  a  terribly  pleasant  office.  Shamans  are  not  normally
allowed to have any political power, because they are sacred. The shaman is
to be found sitting at the headman's side in the council meetings, but after the
council meeting he returns to his hut at the edge of the village. Shamans are
peripheral to society's goings on in ordinary social life in every sense of the
word. They are called on in crisis, and the crisis can be someone dying or ill,
a psychological difficulty, a marital quarrel, a theft, or weather that must be
predicted.


background image

We do not live in that kind of society, so when I explore these plants' effects
and  try  to  call  your  attention  to  them,  it  is  as  a  phenomenon.  I  don't  know
what we can do with this phenomenon, but I have a feeling that the potential
is  great.  The  mind-set  that  I  always  bring  to  it  is  simply  exploratory  and
Baconian—the mapping and gathering of facts.

Herbert Guenther talks about human uniqueness and says one must come to
terms  with  one's  uniqueness.  We  are  naive  about  the  role  of  language  and
being  as  the  primary  facts  of  experience.  What  good  is  a  theory  of  how  the
universe works if it's a series of tensor equations that, even when understood,
come  nowhere  tangential  to  experience?  The  only  intellectual  or  noetic  or
spiritual path worth following is one that builds on personal experience.

What  the  mushroom  says  about  itself  is  this:  that  it  is  an  extraterrestrial
organism,  that  spores  can  survive  the  conditions  of  interstellar  space.  They
are  deep,  deep  purple—the  color  that  they  would  have  to  be  to  absorb  the
deep  ultraviolet  end  of  the  spectrum.  The  casing  of  a  spore  is  one  of  the
hardest organic substances known. The electron density approaches that of a
metal.

The mushroom states its own position very clearly. It says, “I
require  the  nervous  system  of  a  mammal.  Do  you  have  one
handy?”

Is it possible that these mushrooms never evolved on earth? That is what the
Stropharia cubensis itself suggests. Global currents may form on the outside
of the spore. The spores are very light and by Brownian motion are capable
of  percolation  to  the  edge  of  the  planet's  atmosphere.  Then,  through
interaction with energetic particles, some small number could actually escape
into space. Understand that this is an evolutionary strategy where only one in
many  billions  of  spores  actually  makes  the  transition  between  the  stars—a
biological strategy for radiating throughout the galaxy without a technology.
Of course this happens over very long periods of time. But if you think that
the  galaxy  is  roughly  100,000  light-years  from  edge  to  edge,  if  something
were  moving  only  one  one-hundredth  the  speed  of  light—now  that's  not  a
tremendous  speed  that  presents  problems  to  any  advanced  technology—it
could  cross  the  galaxy  in  one  hundred  million  years.  There's  life  on  this
planet  1.8  billion  years  old;  that's  eighteen  times  longer  than  one  hundred
million years. So, looking at the galaxy on those time scales, one sees that the


background image

percolation  of  spores  between  the  stars  is  a  perfectly  viable  strategy  for
biology. It might take millions of years, but it's the same principle by which
plants migrate into a desert or across an ocean.

Is it possible that these mushrooms never evolved on earth?

There  are  no  fungi  in  the  fossil  record  older  than  40  million  years.  The
orthodox  explanation  is  that  fungi  are  soft-bodied  and  do  not  fossilize  well,
but on the other hand we have fossilized soft-bodied worms and other benthic
marine invertebrates from South African gunflint chert that is dated to over a
billion years.

I  don't  necessarily  believe  what  the  mushroom  tells  me;  rather  we  have  a
dialogue.  It  is  a  very  strange  person  and  has  many  bizarre  opinions.  I
entertain it the way I would any eccentric friend. I say, “Well, so that's what
you think.” When the mushroom began saying it was an extraterrestrial, I felt
that I was placed in the dilemma of a child who wishes to destroy a radio to
see  if  there  are  little  people  inside.  I  couldn't  figure  out  whether  the
mushroom is the alien or the mushroom is some kind of technological artifact
allowing  me  to  hear  the  alien  when  the  alien  is  actually  light-years  aways,
using some kind of Bell nonlocality principle to communicate.

The  mushroom  states  its  own  position  very  clearly.  It  says,  “I  require  the
nervous system of a mammal.

Do you have one handy?” 


background image

An Extended Excerpt from BREAKING OPEN

THE HEAD

DANIEL PINCHBECK

When I was 12 years old and in the 7th grade, I bought a used paperback
copy  of  Aldous  Huxley's  psychedelic  classic,  The  Doors  of  Perception.
Looking back on it, the only reason I can think of that led me to buy it
must  have  been  The  Doors  connection.  I  knew  that  Jim  Morrison  took
the band's name from Huxley's slim volume and it must've cost me all of
50 cents, so I picked it up. It wasn't that I liked the Doors or anything—I
didn't  like  them  much  at  all—but  I  was  really,  really  (really!)  curious
about drugs at that age. Something about this mysterious book seemed to
beckon  me  to  take  it  home,  so  I  did,  along  with  a  huge  stack  of  comic
books, I'm quite sure.

I  read  the  entire  book  one  morning  sitting  in  church  with  my  parents
and  grandparents,  who,  of  course,  had  no  idea  what  I  was  reading.  I
often  chose  books  to  read  in  church  that  allowed  me  to  silently  rebel
against  the  odious  weekly  ritual  I  hated  so  much,  so  the  subject  matter
and  the  meager  page  count  made  it  a  perfect  “Sunday  book”  for  me.  I
remember being astonished at what I was reading and made it a point to
immediately—if not sooner—get my hands on some LSD, something that
took  me  about  2  more  years  to  actually  acquire,  but  when  I  did,  it
certainly  didn't  disappoint!  Since  that  time  I  have  returned  again  and
again  to  the  fountain  of  Huxley's  “gratuitous  grace”  during  times  of
crisis or confusion in my life and I have benefited greatly from the inner
journeys  and  clarity  provided  by  LSD,  “magic  mushrooms”  and  later,
the “sci fi” dimensions of the DMT flash. I try to make it a point to take
a high dose of mushrooms at least once a year, if for no other reason, to
blow all the bad shit out of my brain...

The  publication  of  Daniel  Pinchbeck's  book,  Breaking  Open
the  Head
  was,  to  my  mind,  nothing  short  of  an  event,  an
instant classic of drug literature.


background image

The  publication  of  Daniel  Pinchbeck's  book,  Breaking  Open  the  Head
(Broadway  Books)  was,  to  my  mind,  nothing  short  of  an  event.
Pinchbeck, co-founder and co-editor (with novelist Thomas Beller) of the
highbrow  literary  magazine  Open  City,  has  come  up  with  something  I
had  despaired  of  seeing  again  after  the  untimely  death  of  Terence
McKenna,  an  instant  classic  of  drug  literature
.  And  just  in  time:  this
generation  badly  needs  its  own  Doors  of  Perception
  and  Breaking  Open
the Head
 is it, having arrived not a moment too soon.

In  a  way,  Breaking  Open  the  Head  is  almost  two  books  in  one:  on  one
hand  a  historical  overview  of  how  psychedelics  (or  “entheogens”  in
politically  correct  tripper  parlance)  made  their  way  into  the  diet  of
middle  class  American  students,  ushering  in  the  “Age  of  Aquarius,”
“Hippie” and opposition to an unpopular and misguided war and on the
other  a  travelogue  and  marvelously  candid  account  of  Pinchbeck's
shamanic vision quest to “break open” his own head.

What's particularly endearing about the book is that Pinchbeck himself
is such a wonderful tour guide. Feeling alienated and depressed after the
death of his father (Abstract expressionist painter Peter Pinchbeck. His
mother is writer Joyce Johnson, author of Minor Characters
  and  at  one
time  the  girlfriend  of  Jack  Kerouac),  Pinchbeck  became  desperate  to
somehow lift himself out of the Sartrean nau
sea and disconnectedness he
felt  himself  sinking  into  in  his  pursuit  of  a  literary  career  in  his  native
Manhattan.  The  book  chronicles  Pinchbeck's  journey  from  an  atheist
New  York  journalist  to,  as  he  puts  it,  a  “shamanic  initiate  and  grateful
citizen of the cosmos.”

At  times  I  couldn't  help  but  to  picture  George  Plimpton,  one  of  the
original “participatory journalists,” in Daniel's place and this illustrates
one  of  the  book's  greatest  strengths  for  the  reader:  in  many  ways
Pinchbeck  seems  an  unlikely  candidate  for  spiritual  enlightenment.  As
he  describes  himself  at  the  start  of  the  book,  he's  very  much  an  “old
school”  kind  of  writer,  a  drinker  and  a  bit  of  a  womanizer—more
Hemingway  than  Huxley—before  a  series  of  marvelously  etched  (and
often  humorous)  encounters  with  Amazon  witchdoctors,  shaman,  and
the blissed out inhabitants of the Burning Man Festival urge Pinchbeck
on  to  a  deeper  and  deeper  understanding,  not  just  of  himself  also  the
weird historical moment we find ourselves in as we approach 10 minutes


background image

to midnight on the Apocalypse clock.

About halfway through the narrative, I began to lament that Pinchbeck
seemed  to  be  missing  out  on  the  occult  (as  opposed  to  the  “spiritual”)
aspects  of  the  psychedelic  experience,  but  at  that  point  a  startlingly
magical
 context (and one I, personally, wholeheartedly endorse) begins to
emerge  as  he  asks  himself—and  the  reader—some  very  important
questions:  If  these  dimensions  can  be  accessed  by  the  judicious
application  of  plant  and  chemical  agents  and  if  the  bizarrely  alien
entities one encounters there are real and autonomous beings
 and not just
a drug addled figment of our imaginations—then surely this is big news,
isn't it?

Big  fucking  news,  people.  Big  fucking  news...  But  what  does  this
mean??? Why aren't our finest minds working on getting to the bottom
of  this,  one  of  the  greatest  mysteries  facing  us  as  human  beings?  Why
instead are we turning away
 from wisdom and towards self-annihilation,
war and planetary suicide? It doesn't make any damned sense!

As Einstein once said “God does not play dice with the universe.” Could
the  widespread  emergence  of  psychedelics  in  Western  culture  be  any
accident? 50 years ago, psychedelics were practically unheard of outside
of botanical or Beatnik circles. Today, an historical blink of the eye since,
due to the pioneering public relations efforts of Allen Ginsberg, William
Burroughs,  Timothy  Leary,  Terence  McKenna  and  others,  millions  of
people have experienced the enlightenment of the psychedelic experience.
No, this was no accident, it's all part of a strange and wondrous process
that is unfolding in our lifetimes and Breaking Open the Head
 is a part of
that  process  and  carries  on  in  that  tradition.  The  enlightenment  and
gnosis
  resulting  from  the  use  of  visionary  plants  and  neuro-chemicals
may be mankind's only
 hope for survival.

In  an  interesting  interview  that  appeared  in  the  Arthur  newspaper,
Pinchbeck argues that this is
 the task of the counterculture in our time:
“This  goal  is  the  direct  legacy  of  the  counterculture—but  it  is  actually
hundreds if not many thousands of years older than that. In fact, this is
the  mission  that  we  must  somehow  accomplish.  Think  of  it  as  a  secret
raid  to  be  carried  out  behind  enemy  lines,  despite  incredible  odds  and
with no possibility of failure. The Beats and the Hippies saw through the


background image

abrasive  insanity  gnawing  at  the  soul  of  America—this  warmongering,
money-mad,  climate-destroying  monstrosity  which  is  now  casting  a
dreadful  shadow  across  this  planet.  Where  the  Beats  acted  intuitively,
from the heart, we now have the necessary knowledge to put together a
new  paradigm  that  is  simultaneously  political,  ecological,  spiritual,  and
far more accurate than the outdated Newtonian-Darwinian model which
is propping up the status quo.”

Breaking  Open  the  Head  is  a  serious,  thoughtful,  provocative  and  brave
book that should be read by everyone who senses that breaking open his
or  her  own  head  might  be  the  sanest  act  to  perform  in  today's  world.  I
urge you to all to read it.

-Richard Metzger

Think  of  it  as  a  secret  raid  to  be  carried  out  behind  enemy
lines, despite incredible odds and with no possibility of failure.

1. Not for Human Consumption

I  met  Dave  in  Palenque.  He  had  started  a  company  selling  experimental
research  chemicals  which  were  labeled  “not  for  human  consumption,”
although most of them could be found in the back pages of Sasha Shulgin's
books. Sitting by the pool one day, I heard Dave tell how he had studied to be
a  priest,  but  dropped  out  to  become  a  professional  masseuse.  By  some
circuitous  route—a  typical  tangled  American  odyssey—he  made  his  way
from  the  Miami  Beach  yacht  scene  to  psychedelics  and  the  cutting-edge  of
mind-expansion.  In  Palenque,  Dave  invited  me  to  join  his  private  research
group, giving me free and low-priced introductions to some new chemicals,
as  well  as  his  regular  catalog  of  little-known  and  unscheduled  compounds.
Fearing intensified government surveillance, he abruptly closed his company
the day after the September 11 terrorist attacks, even though his business did
not seem to be violating any specific laws.

For  $125,  I  bought  one  gram  of  yellowish  powder  of
something  called  DPT,  dipropyltryptamine,  which  has  a
chemical resemblance to DMT.

Back in New York, I ordered a few things from his catalog. They came to my
home in plain envelopes labeled with intimidating chemical names. For $125,


background image

I  bought  one  gram  of  yellowish  powder  of  something  called  DPT,
dipropyltryptamine, which has  a chemical resemblance  to DMT. As  far as I
can  ascertain,  DPT,  unlike  DMT,  does  not  occur  in  nature,  which  means  it
did not exist until some modern alchemist synthesized it in a laboratory a few
decades  ago.  While  DMT,  an  endogamous  chemical  inside  the  body,  is
recognized  by  MAO  enzymes  and  immediately  neutralized,  DPT,  a  new
concoction, is not. Therefore it crosses the blood-brain barrier through direct
sniffing or swallowing. But the most interesting aspect of the two chemicals
is that the worlds they reveal are completely different. Why should this be the
case?  I  don't  know.  I  only  know  that  propyl  and  methyl  are  simple  carbon
compounds,  two  of  the  building  blocks  of  organic  matter.  There  is,  for
example, methyl alcohol, wood alcohol, and propyl alcohol, rubbing alcohol.
The  tryptamine  molecule  is  the  building  block  of  many  neurotransmitters,
and of many psychoactive compounds. Serotonin is a tryptamine.


background image

In  Shulgin's  book  and  on  the  Internet  I  found  some  write-ups  about  DPT
trips.  Some  described  the  effects  as  terrifying:  “The  whole  universe  falls
apart,  all  colors  in  electric  air  whirlpool  into  a  mandala,  eaten  up  forever.
That's it, the world's over.” Others felt, after smoking the drug, they entered,
for the first time, the “clear light” of God. Another report was more narrative:
“I was being led by a wise old man who I know was God... I was handed a
Torah  for  me  to  carry  as  a  sign  that  I  had  been  accepted,  and  forgiven,  and
come home.” Shulgin also mentioned a church in New York, Temple of the
True Inner Light, which uses DPT as its sacrament. Clearly DPT was a mind-
warper of heavyweight proportions. I put the slim envelope of white powder


background image

in the refrigerator, where it sat for a few months.

I am often caught between my desire for new and intense altered states and
my extreme fear of them. I fear them, because every major doorway that I go
through changes me in an ineffable but permanent way. I think this is the case
for anyone with any sensitivity. After your first serious LSD trip, you really
are  never  quite  the  same  person  again—you  have  been  given  another
perspective  on  your  self  and  your  ego;  you  have  been  permanently
relativized.  The  same  with  DMT,  or  ayahuasca.  You  may  spend  the  rest  of
your life suppressing the memory, but somewhere inside of you it is there. As
Don  Juan  told  Castaneda:  “We  are  men  and  our  lot  is  to  learn  and  to  be
hurled into inconceivable new worlds.”

I  am  often  caught  between  my  desire  for  new  and  intense
altered  states  and  my  extreme  fear  of  them.  I  fear  them,
because every major doorway that I go through changes me in
an ineffable but permanent way.

Psychedelics  are  catalysts  for  evolution  and  transformation,  and  when  you
take them, you have to be ready to transform in unexpected ways. That is the
beauty and the power of them, that is why they need to be treated with utmost
respect.  That  is  also  why  it  is  good  to  be  scientifically  precise  about  what
chemical you are taking, to know, as best as you can, what that chemical will
do  to  you,  and  why  you  are  taking  it.  Because  I  didn't  know  exactly  what
DPT  was,  or  what  I  wanted  from  it,  I  bought  it  and  then  sheepishly  left  it
alone.

My  cautious  resistance  to  the  DPT  lure  continued  until  one  night,  after  a
party.  For  the  first  time  in  several  months,  I  was  drunk.  I  was  with  my  two
oldest friends, twin brothers, who were suddenly eager to try the DPT in my
fridge. We each snorted a line and for me, it was an interesting disaster. I was
both drunk and tripping. On the one hand, the world was a woozy mess; on
the  other  hand,  I  was  seeing  it  with  razor-edged  precision  and  in  the  most
vibrant colors. When I closed my eyes, I saw multicolored three-dimensional
triangles  rotating  in  black  space.  I  realized  later  that  I  had  foolishly  used
alcohol  to  overcome  my  fear  of  DPT—the  way  I  used  to  drink  for  the
courage to talk to girls at bars. I didn't like DPT. Something about the DPT
realm  seemed  icy  and  annihilating  to  me.  I  told  my  friends  over  and  over
again,  “This  is  evil.  DPT  is  bad.  This  is  not  something  we  should  explore.


background image

This is not a good doorway.”

In retrospect, I don't think that I was exploring the DPT realm on that trip. I
think, instead, the DPT realm was beginning its exploration of me.

Because  this  is  a  story  not  just  about  chemicals  but  about  occult
correspondences and psychic events, I will note that later that night we went
out  to  a  bar  and  started  talking  to  the  people  next  to  us.  For  some  reason  I
talked about my anxiety over 2012, the Hopi and Mayan Prophecies. One of
them  described  a  vivid  dream  she  had  when  she  was  a  teenager,  that  had
stayed with her ever since: “I was in a kind of space ship full of people. We
were  lifting  off  from  earth.  I  looked  back  at  the  earth  and  there  was  brown
crust where the land had been. We shot into space and went a long way. Then
an  angel  appeared  to  us.  He  said  that  God  had  decided  to  rejuvenate  the
Earth, even though we had ruined it. He was going to start again—to do it all
over from scratch. For the time being we were going to have to wait in limbo.
And  he  pointed  to  a  vast  grey  space  where  many  people  were  already
waiting.  We  had  to  leave  the  space  ship  to  go  there.”  It  was  another  few
months before I tried DPT again.

In  the  meantime,  another  new  friend  from  Palenque  accepted  my  invitation
and came to New York. This was Charity the fire dancer. Twenty-four years
old,  skilled  at  Tarot  and  ceremonial  magic,  a  professional  stripper,  she  was
the  fearless  and  pixie-like  embodiment  of  the  new  culture  I  had  found  at
Burning  Man.  In  Mexico,  I  told  her  I  could  find  her  a  free  place  to  stay  in
New  York,  and  she  hitchhiked  all  the  way  from  Palenque  with  her  cat,
Prometheus,  catching  rides  from  truckers  at  truck  stops.  Unlike  me,  Charity
had no fear of new psychedelics. She kept a list of all the drugs she had tried,
and the number was up to 43. I told her I had this DPT stuff around, and of
course she wanted to try it.

Charity  cut  two  big  lines  of  the  DPT  on  the  table,  and  I
snorted  one.  The  powder  burned  my  nasal  passages.  Bitter
residue  dripped  down  the  back  of  my  throat.  I  stretched  out
on the couch. In a minute or two, I closed my eyes and entered
the DPT realm.

Charity  and  I  took  DPT  at  my  house  one  night—once  again,  I  had  to
overcome  an  intense  initial  reluctance.  Finally  I  put  some  of  the  yellowish
powder into a pill and swallowed it, but got no effect. She sniffed a line, and


background image

almost instantly went into a trance. When her trip was over, she told me I had
to try sniffing it.

For  a  flicker  of  forever,  I  was  imprisoned  in  a  post-modern
bar  surrounded  by  gleaming  mirrors  with  a  hyper-slick
lounge lizard wearing a white Mohawk and synthetic fabrics.
He  was  sitting  at  the  bar,  drinking  a  highball.  DPT  was  a
post-modern demonic MTV psychedelic.

Sometimes,  when  one  trips,  it  seems  that  all  of  the  psychic  matter,  whether
spoken  or  not,  swirling  around  in  the  hours  and  days  beforehand,  gathers
together,  like  particles  galvanized  by  a  magnet,  and  pushes  the  journey  in  a
certain  direction.  These  influences  can  seem  like  the  karmic  trace  of  some
larger  pattern.  On  many  levels  what  seems  to  operate  is  a  specific
intentionality.  Earlier  that  night  Charity  had  told  me  about  the  “psychic
vampires” who roamed the streets of San Francisco, some of them homeless
hippies, who would pick up vibrations from strangers, talk to them, and suck
their  energy  away.  I  laughed  at  this.  We  also  talked  about  the  books  of
Zacharia  Sitchen,  whose  scholarly  research  convinced  him  that  a  race  of
extraterrestrial  giants  had  created  human  beings,  long  ago,  to  serve  them  as
staves—a  variation  on  the  concept  of  the  “Archons”  from  Gnosticism.
According  to  Sitchen,  the  beauty  and  sophistication  of  the  cruel  alien  race
that created us was beyond our imagining.

Charity  cut  two  big  lines  of  the  DPT  on  the  table,  and  I  snorted  one.  The
powder  burned  my  nasal  passages.  Bitter  residue  dripped  down  the  back  of
my throat. I stretched out on the couch. In a minute or two, I closed my eyes
and entered the DPT realm.

We  were  listening  to  moody  Techno  music.  With  each  change  in  beat,  with
each  skitter  of  electrical  noise,  I  saw  a  brand  new  and  extremely  detailed
demonic universe swirl before me in cobalt, scarlet, purple gossamer hues. At
moments  there  seemed  to  be  some  incredibly  elegant  yet  violently  orgiastic
party  taking  place  with  beautiful  females  in  evening  gowns  and  men  in
Edwardian top coats in the spacious parlors of a huge and opulent mansion.
At  other  times  there  seemed  to  be  bat  or  butterfly-winged  creatures—long
and quivering antennas, velvet coats and emerald eyes, stiletto talons—rising
into  otherworldly  skies,  wandering  futuristic  cities.  I  had  an  impression  of
tremendous  vanity.  “I”  was  being  used  as  a  mirror  for  the  DPT  beings  to


background image

admire  themselves.  But  their  realm  was  beyond  what  can  be  expressed  in
ordinary  language  in  its  speed  of  transmutation,  its  shivering  quicksilver
beauty.

The worlds revealed were like endless facets of a twirling diamond—I felt the
real  possibility  of  being  trapped  inside  any  of  those  facets,  a  kind  of  soul-
prison, for eternity. That was the terror of it. As with smoking Salvia, I had
the  sense  that  some  part  of  me  had  always  been  stuck  in  this  Gothic  DPT
prison,  trapped  there  eternally.  I  somehow  understood  that  this  was  not  my
first visit, nor my last.

For a flicker of forever, I was imprisoned in a post-modern bar surrounded by
gleaming mirrors with a hyper-slick lounge lizard wearing a white Mohawk
and  synthetic  fabrics.  He  was  sitting  at  the  bar,  drinking  a  highball.  There
were no doors or windows in this room, no escape possible. The graphics of
this  vision  were  high-res  and  hyper-perfect.  Other  shards  of  the  DPT  realm
shared  this  sci-fi  quality.  DPT  was  a  post-modern  demonic  MTV
psychedelic.

The sleek, rhythmical mesh of the music seemed woven into the lurid fabric
of  the  darkness,  the  revelation  of  sinister  forces  coming  to  life  behind  my
eyelids.

Like  DMT,  the  level  of  visual  organization  of  the  DPT  realm  seemed  far
beyond anything that the synaptical wiring of my brain could create—it was,
in its own peacock-feathery way, not just as real as this reality, but far more
real, crackling with power. I felt from the entities exploring my mind a kind
of contempt, a disdain for human beings trapped in our pitiful unsophisticated
domain,  our  meat  realm.  They  seemed  somewhere  between  bemused  and
enraged.

In  shamanic  cultures,  the  taking  of  entheogenic  substances  is  always
surrounded  by  ritual.  A  circle  of  protection  is  created,  the  four  directions
invoked,  the  spirits  asked  for  their  blessing  through  an  offering  of  tobacco
and  prayer.  Because  we  were  sniffing  a  chemical  powder  in  a  modern  New
York  apartment,  a  chemical  without  a  long  history  of  human  use,  it  didn't
even  occur  to  us  to  take  such  precautions.  I  was  jealous  of  Charity  because
she managed to get to the kitchen sink and throw up. She vomited four or five
times in a row—later she said she saw a male entity in the sink with a kind of
device or machine that he was using to soak up the energy she was expulsing,


background image

jeering at her as he did it. The demon told her his name but she couldn't recall
it.  I  couldn't  throw  up.  I  suspected  that  I  had  finally,  and  completely,
managed to destroy myself. I was convinced I would never recover from this
onslaught.  I  staggered  to  the  CD  player  and  changed  the  music  to  Bach,
which helped a little. With my eyes opened, transformational energy seemed
to be crawling over everything, flickering and receding like waves of sentient
power—vampiric  electricity.  My  hands  looked  and  felt  like  claws  made  out
of  wires.  When  I  opened  my  eyes  on  ayahuasca,  I  also  felt  and  saw  energy
passing like a waveform, but it was more human somehow. Here the speed of
the  waves  was  much  faster  and  more  brutal  than  the  yagé  flares.  The
experience was unmammalian, futuristic, inhuman.

About  half  an  hour  into  the  trip,  past  3  a.m.,  I  called  my
friend Tony. “This is total magic, total sorcery. I am watching
endless  Gothic  demon  universes  mirroring  each  other,”  I
babbled to him.

Not only was it suddenly obvious that there was such a thing as a soul, it was
also clear that I was in danger of losing mine permanently.

I  somehow  understood  that  the  DPT  realm  had  evolved  over  an  incredibly
long period—millions of years, if time had the same kind of meaning to them
as  it  does  to  us.  I  realized  there  were  occult  hierarchies,  secret  cabals,
treasuries of wickedness to be studied over millennia. It was obvious that we
little human beings have absolutely no idea what is going on in the cosmos.
The  word  “baroque”  doesn't  even  begin  to  begin  to  describe  the  jaded
emptiness  and  sublime  beauty  of  that  other  country.  A  little  bit  like  soft
candle-flicker worlds you see on hash and opium, but etched in perfect solid-
state reality—more than photographic. The sleekness of the DPT dimension
was beyond belief.

About half an hour into the trip, past 3 a.m., I called my friend Tony.

“This  is  total  magic,  total  sorcery.  I  am  watching  endless  Gothic  demon
universes  mirroring  each  other,”  I  babbled  to  him.  “If  someone  could  be  at
home  here,  learn  to  control  things  here,  they  could  gain  so  much  fucking
power  they  could  just  walk  right  through  the  walls  of  the  White  House,  do
anything, but it wouldn't matter, because they would already be part of such
an ancient conspiracy.” I had begun to pace around the house, and as I paced,
I  found  that  I  was  moving  my  arms  in  the  air—making  “passes”  like  the


background image

shamanic gestures described in Castaneda's work. These gestures came to me
intuitively. They seemed to help control the overwhelming sense of assault.

“Daniel, don't be taken in by it. It's just samsara,” Tony said. His voice was a
soothing  lifeline.  He  laughed  at  me.  He  tried  to  convince  me  that  the  trip
would  end  soon,  that  I  wasn't  permanently  fried.  He  told  me  I  should  have
known what I was doing, since I had called DPT “evil” after my first attempt.

“What's that music you're playing in the background?” he asked.

“Bach,”  I  told  him.  “It's  the  only  thing  that's  keeping  me  together.  Perhaps
that's  why  they  are  here;  the  demons  are  attracted  to  the  music.  They  are
crowding in here to be close to it.”

“Well, that's nice,” he said.

“There's  nothing  nice  about  that!”  I  screeched  at  him.  “They  are  totally
defiant. They don't give a shit about us; we are their puppets.”

But at this point the trip was starting to wind down. In a few minutes Charity
and  I  were  back  in  “reality”  once  again—whatever  that  figment  might  be.  I
felt incredibly relieved. “Wow, I can't believe it,” I said to Tony. “Reality—
this is definitely a good thing!”

In  the  next  few  days,  however,  I  learned  that  I  wasn't  quite  back  in  reality
after all—or if I was, it was a new, hyper-charged one.

I was supposed to leave to meet my girlfriend in Berlin the next day. In the
morning  my  travel  agent  came  up  with  a  cheap  last  minute  ticket.  On  the
plane, I sat next to a German woman dressed in elegant black. I was reading
The Invisible Landscape by Terence and Dennis McKenna, and I noticed she
seemed  startled  after  she  read  a  few  words  from  the  back  cover  over  my
shoulder.  She  had  read  the  word  “shamanism.”  Halfway  through  the  flight,
she told me she had been having a series of dreams over the past months in
which two American Indians, a couple, came into her house and told her that
she was meant to be a shaman, that she wasn't supposed to get married. She
was meant to devote herself to shamanism totally. The dreams mystified her.
She  had  never  thought  about  shamanism  and  she  had  no  idea  what  it  was.
“Do you know anything about it?” she asked.

I  tried  to  explain  the  basics  of  shamanism  and  gave  her  the  names  of  some
books  to  read.  Also  I  told  her  what  I  believed—what  I  had  learned  from


background image

Robert: “The Indian cultures have been almost wiped out, but shamanism is
an  essential  human  phenomenon  connected  to  the  earth.  Right  now,  the
shamans  of  the  past  are  looking  for  candidates  who  can  carry  on  the
traditions.  They  have  zeroed  in  on  you  as  a  possible  candidate.  You  can
choose to follow this or ignore it, but I definitely recommend that you learn
more about it before making a decision.”

The  woman  had  a  tribal  pendant  around  her  neck—on  it  was  a  pattern  of
lightning-like  zigzags  around  a  central  circle—and  I  asked  her  about  it.
“Somebody  gave  this  to  me  on  a  beach  in  Mexico,”  she  said.  “They  said  it
was a Navajo protection symbol.”

In  shamanic  cultures,  synchronicities  are  recognized  as  signs
that you are on the right path.

I do not think the world is orchestrated as a paranoid conspiracy designed to
entertain my wildest fantasies. Yet I had an intuitive, uncanny sense that this
symbol  had  been  sent  to  me—to  show  me  that  I  was  being  protected,
somehow,  that  I  was  being  taken  through  a  process.  Even  though  I  was
freaking  out,  I  had  to  trust  that  the  process  was  good.  In  shamanic  cultures,
synchronicities are recognized as signs that you are on the right path.

I  was  in  Berlin  because  Laura's  father  had  been  stricken  with  cancer.  The
entire family was assembling for the weekend. Because Laura was pregnant
and  wouldn't  be  able  to  travel  later,  she  was  staying  with  her  parents  for
several weeks.

Whenever  I  was  left  alone,  I  found  myself  walking  around  the  house  and
making conducting gestures again. I was afraid I was becoming some sort of
obsessive-compulsive,  but  I  could  control  the  gestures  when  other  people
were around. One night, I couldn't sleep.

With my eyes closed, I watched vivid imagery unfold in little film loops—I
saw  a  huge  column  of  fire  shooting  up  from  the  center  of  Stonehenge.  I
envisioned  myself  walking  into  the  flame  column,  being  obliterated  and
shooting up into space. Then I saw the surface of another planet, covered in
coral and sponge-like growths. A smirking alien was standing next to one of
the sponges, and he kept flowing through the organic folds of the plant, then
reassembling himself. He and the plant were fused in magical symbiosis.

Finally I fell asleep. I dreamt of a boy standing in the woods, yelling over and


background image

over again at the top of his lungs: “Long live ethnopharmacology!”

The next night, I had two extremely vivid dreams in which I was pursued by
a bearded man. In one dream, I threw a party in an apartment where I once
lived. Aggressive strangers showed up and stole my books from the shelves.
A bearded man came up to me.

“I used to live here,” he said.

“Do you want to come back?” I asked.

“Yes,” he said.

Back  in  New  York,  I  still  felt  very  strange—fizzy  and  non-ordinary,  with  a
buzzing  around  the  temples.  It  was  my  second  night  at  home  and  I  was  jet-
lagged.  Ten  minutes  after  I  turned  out  the  lights  and  got  into  bed,  a  large
mirror in the other room fell off the wall and loudly crashed face down on the
floor. It didn't break.

All  night  I  dreamt  that  the  bearded  man  was  hitting  me  in  the  head  with  a
pillow over and over again, and laughing as he did it. I tried to hit him back
but my swings were feeble misses.

When I awoke in the morning, feeling groggy, I went to get a yogurt from the
refrigerator. I opened the tightly closed silverware drawer and reached for a
spoon. Right under the spoons was a large and ominous bug. It did not look
like a New York bug at all—it was winged, honey-brown, with a long curly
tail, and it quickly wriggled out of sight.

I screamed and slammed the drawer shut.

Fuck,  I  thought.  The  DPT  trip  had  unleashed  an  angry  poltergeist  in  my
house.  How  could  this  be?  I  have  never  had  a  belief  or  even  the  slightest
interest  in  poltergeists  or  the  occult,  but  the  signs  couldn't  be  much  more
obvious. Suddenly I was in the midst of something for which I had no frame
of reference, no preparation. What had I done? Once again, as often before, I
cursed myself for my fascination with these chemicals.

I walked around in a panic. I went to the East Village and sat at a cafe. On the
way  I  stopped  in  a  Tibetan  Buddhist  store.  I  asked  the  clerk  if  he  had  any
symbols  of  protection,  and  he  sold  me  a  small  metal  dorje—the  Tibetan
lightning  bolt  symbol  used  in  meditation.  I  still  felt  fizzy—I  had  a  tingling
around my left temple and my left hand was buzzing slightly. Clutching the


background image

dorje in my fist, I called Charity and told her about the situation.

“Oh man,” she said. “We've got to clean that thing out of there before your
girlfriend comes back with the baby.”

It turned out that Charity, from her days of San Francisco witchcraft (modern
paganism  was  another  scene  I  always  dismissed),  knew  all  about  exorcisms
and entities. She had carted with her, all the way from Mexico, an entire kit
bag  of  magical  implements—including  a  large  and  beautifully  smooth
obsidian ball that somebody gave her in Palenque, and some quartz crystals.
While  I  knew  that  quartz  was  used  for  shamanic  healing,  to  realign  energy
patterns,  I  did  not  know  that  obsidian  was  considered  to  have  the  power  of
absorption  of  negative  spiritual  energies.  “This  ball  is  so  excellent,  it  just
sucks  all  that  stuff  right  up,”  Charity  said.  She  also  brought  ceremonial
candleholders (tacky little sculptures of a cat and an elephant, which became
Bas  and  Ganesh  for  the  duration  of  the  ceremony),  and  Aleister  Crowley's
elegant Tarot cards. I met her and we went back to the apartment.

“I can already feel it,” she said when we were in the lobby. And it was true—
the  air  in  the  building  seemed  electrically  charged,  more  so  in  the  elevator,
and in the apartment, the charge was almost a physical presence. Charity put
the  obsidian  ball  down  on  the  ground  in  the  center  of  the  living  room.  We
both  watched,  astonished,  as  it  took  the  ball  an  extremely  long  time  to  stop
trembling, finally rotating in smaller and smaller circles until it stopped. She
organized  a  quick  magical  ritual,  consulting  the  Tarot  cards  several  times.  I
had also never given Tarot cards much thought, but now I was watching them
as if my life depended on it—I felt, in some obscure and woozy way, perhaps
it did.

She  picked  a  card  with  lightning  bolts  all  over  it,  “Swiftness.”  “So  we'll  be
swift,”  she  said.  She  picked  “Fortune,”  suggesting  a  change  for  the  better.
She  picked  “Futility”—my  heart  sank—but  opposite  it,  “The  Queen  of
Cups,”  my  court  card.  “Because  your  card  is  a  water  sign,  we've  got  to  do
something  with  water,”  she  said,  quickly  analyzing  the  situation  like  a
technician  faced  with  an  engineering  problem.  She  soaked  the  obsidian  ball
in salt water, then held it in the toilet and flushed a few times.

“Take that bullshit out of here,” she commanded.

At  the  end  of  the  ritual,  the  atmosphere  in  the  apartment  seemed  changed,


background image

cleared out. It was, we thought, safe again.

It  was  safe  until  later  that  night,  when  I  returned  from  visiting  Tony.  Once
again, I felt the apartment crackling with a static occult buzz. My temple and
left  hand  started  buzzing  weirdly.  I  had  been  jokingly  complaining  to  Tony
about  the  supernatural  forces  taking  such  obvious  manifestations—a  falling
mirror,  a  big  bug.  It  was  all  so  silly,  so  comic  book-like,  even  flirtatious.
Once again, the joke seemed to be on me as I lay in bed and felt increasingly
creeped-out and panicked.

I went into the living room and sat in front of the obsidian ball. I picked up
the  dorje  and  chanted  a  bit—nonsense  words,  Asiatic-sounding,  insectile,
similar  to  what  I  recalled  of  the  Secoya  language,  came  into  my  head  and  I
called them out. “Ching! Ching! Gada-ching! Gada-gada-ching!” I rapped the
hard surface of the black ball with the vajra, then I held the vajra in my palms
before the ball and looked straight at the ball.

In a few seconds, my entire visual field turned grey.

All  I  could  see  were  a  few  rectangles  of  refracted  light  in  the  center  of  the
ball; thick greyness covered everything else.

I turned away from the ball and looked around the room.

In two seconds my vision went back to normal. I looked back at the ball.

My entire visual field turned grey yet again.

I grabbed my jacket and ran out of the house. Once in the street, I called my
friend Michael. Michael is 20 years older than me; a poet and novelist with
an  impressive  knowledge  of  alternative  healing  and  indigenous  cultures,  he
first  told  me  about  ayahuasca.  For  an  hour,  as  I  paced  around  the  streets  of
downtown  New  York,  Michael  tried  to  calm  me  down.  He  told  me  some
Buddhist meditation techniques to “get you back in your body.” He told me
that  even  if  there  were  some  “other”  out  there—and  he  was  not  convinced
there was—I had to recognize that aspects of my mind had manifested all of
this stuff. “It takes two to tango,” Michael said. Rather than fighting against it
I could accept it, integrate it within myself.

Michael told me to imagine a Buddha hovering over me, shooting pure white
light  through  my  body,  turning  me  into  blinding  white  light,  flushing
everything negative or bad into my central channel where it would go into my


background image

intestines and ultimately come out of me as shit. At the end of the meditation,
Michael  told  me  to  imagine  this  Buddha  coming  down  to  me  as  I  merged
with the white light.

I followed his instructions, and it seemed to help. Soon I fell asleep. By the
next morning, the world had returned to some semblance of normal.

Perhaps  this  story  seems  ridiculous—yet  the  psychic  reality  of  the  DPT
encounter  and  its  aftermath  overwhelm  most  ordinary  events.  I  offer  it  as  a
cautionary  tale.  There  are  aspects  of  it  that  remain,  for  various  reasons,
impossible to tell. Suffice it to say, after DPT, that I suspect death is not the
worst thing that can happen to a person. There are far worse fates.

2. New Sensations

For  over  a  year,  I  had  carefully  studied  my  dreams,  waking  three  or  four
times a night to write down images, conversations, disjointed narratives, and
semi-conscious visions. Sometimes, lying in bed on the threshold of sleep, I
would  see  myself  as  a  corpse  devoured  by  birds,  or  I  would  be  processed
through some kind of cosmic sausage-grinder. In one dream, I was crucified
and  my  corpse  paraded  through  an  African  town  by  laughing  Bwiti
tribesmen.  In  another,  I  was  given  directions  to  undertake  the  alchemical
“Great  Work”  in  an  airport  lobby.  My  dream  life  changed  in  other  ways  as
well.  I  would  fall  asleep  thinking  about  some  esoteric  concept,  and
throughout the night I would awaken repeatedly to find my unconscious mind
was still holding the idea tightly, turning it around in different ways. I began
to  realize  that  sleep  is  an  extension  of  waking  awareness,  not  just  an
extinguishing  of  it.  The  change  in  my  dream  life  suggested  some  kind  of
shamanic or esoteric initiation. It felt as though the ideas that fascinated me
were slowly filtering from my thoughts into my bloodstream, permeating my
cells. Despite these hints, despite my fascination with the subject, I assumed
that shamanism would remain a phenomenon “out there” that I was studying,
in the distanced and analytical way I had always pursued intellectual subjects.

According  to  the  mystic  Gurdjieff,  intellectual  knowledge—technical  or
academic  mastery  of  any  subject—is  always  shallow  and  one-dimensional.
“Knowledge by itself does not give understanding.... Understanding depends
upon  the  relation  of  knowledge  to  being.”  He  thought  that  ancient  cultures
prioritized  one's  state  of  being—developed  through  self-discipline  and


background image

spiritual training—while modern culture only appreciates the amount that one
knows:  “People  of  Western  culture  put  great  value  on  the  level  of  a  man's
knowledge but they do not value the level of a man's being and they are not
ashamed  of  the  low  level  of  their  own  being.”  If  understanding  is  linked  to
being, then certain types of phenomena can only be comprehended when the
observer  has  changed:  “There  are  things  for  the  understanding  of  which  a
different  being  is  necessary.”  This  transformative  process  takes  place  in
stages, over time.

Michael  told  me  to  imagine  a  Buddha  hovering  over  me,
shooting  pure  white  light  through  my  body,  turning  me  into
blinding white light, flushing everything negative or bad into
my  central  channel  where  it  would  go  into  my  intestines  and
ultimately come out of me as shit.

It  is  hard  to  calculate  precisely,  but  in  small-scale  tribal  societies  probably
one  out  of  every  25  or  30  people  receives  a  shamanic  calling.  Since
shamanism  seems  to  be  a  universal  phenomenon,  this  statistic  should  be
cross-cultural, which means there are at least ten million people in our culture
who  potentially  fit  the  shamanic  role.  Some  of  those  people  are  currently
alternative healers of some sort, some are artists or psychologists, and I have
no  doubt  that  many  of  them  are  imprisoned  in  mental  hospitals,  or  they  are
among the muttering homeless who refuse integration into the mass society.
Whether  or  not  they  even  realize  it,  they  are  people,  like  myself,  for  whom
contact  with  the  invisible  world  is  as  essential  as  ordinary  knowledge  or
material gain or any other reward that the “real world” can offer.

This is what I suspect happened when I made my alliance: A
somewhat mischievous being from a higher-vibrational realm
melded itself into my consciousness.

This  is  what  I  suspect  happened  when  I  made  my  alliance:  A  somewhat
mischievous  being  from  a  higher-vibrational  realm  melded  itself  into  my
consciousness.

For  a  few  weeks  after  the  events,  I  felt  this  other  “it”  as  a  new  perspective
inside of my mind. My perceptions seemed more acute, my thoughts zingier.
There were certain aspects of reality that I seemed to be picking up without
conscious intent. For instance, walking around the streets of New York, I felt
more  conscious  of  the  way  that  symbols  and  logos  in  advertisments  and  on


background image

clothes  stood  for  unconscious  forces,  how  they  shaped  and  manipulated
social reality. All logos, all symbols, seemed to draw energy from the occult
dimension,  the  DPT  realm.  Even  watching  a  basketball  game  on  television
became  unbearable—the  manipulations  were  so  obvious.  The  underlying
messages—beer  for  self-oblivion,  jeep  for  planetary  destruction  and
accelerated  extinction—so  mind-numbingly  clear.  Post-DPT,  I  had  to
overcome a new sense of contempt for humanity—myseif included—as well
as an increased sympathy for the devil.

I studied the DPT reports on the Internet with more care. Several of the DPT
takers went to the same place as me: “I felt as if DPT were a sinister, sinister
being  that  was  laughing  at  me.  Humans  are  so  weak.  DPT  destroys  you,”
wrote  one  of  them.  Charity  and  I  were  not  the  only  people  to  confront  that
terror.  Others  had  also  felt  the  manifestation  of  a  seemingly  sinister  entity.
Some  of  them  worried  they  had  torn  apart  the  fabric  of  reality:  “It's  very
obvious the human world was as stable as a house of toothpicks, amazing it
didn't  fall  apart  sooner  in  history,  but  the  hideous  human  angel  hasn't  been
crawling along the planet that long at all, and now someone pulled the plug
out  accidentally.”  This  writer  also  passed,  at  high  speed,  through  Gothic
realms where other people seemed to be present in some parallel dimension.
Many  takers  of  DPT  experience  the  classic  rising  of  kundalini  energy—the
Hindus  call  it  shakti—from  the  base  of  their  spine  to  the  top  of  their  skull,
sometimes  leading  to  out-of-control  body  shudders.  Unsurprisingly,  DPT
often seems to generate an extreme fear reaction.

As noted earlier, Rick Strassman theorizes that DMT, nn-dimethyltryptamine,
is the “spirit molecule” which releases the soul into the spirit realm. If that is
the  case,  I  suspect  it  is  possible  that  DPT  serves  the  same  function  in  some
other realm—the supernatural world of magical entities sketched by Aubrey
Beardsley  and  described  by  Aleister  Crowley.  Perhaps  DPT  is  the  “demon
molecule”—recognizing  that  demons  are  ambiguous  entities  in  many
traditions.  In  Tibetan  Buddhism,  all  deities  have  both  their  benevolent  and
wrathful  aspects.  The  wrathful  deities  in  Tibetan  Buddhism  are  depicted  as
frightening  monsters,  drinking  blood  out  of  skulls,  multi-armed,  with  fangs
and talons. As the flipside of the Buddha—and ultimately aspects of the inner
self—such  deities  call  to  mind  an  old  proverb:  “The  devil  is  God  as  He  is
misunderstood by the wicked.”

In  making  this  alliance—in  this  speculative  interpretation—not  only  did  I


background image

have  no  control  once  the  process  was  set  in  motion,  but  the  entity  that
integrated  into  me  had  little  choice  in  the  matter  as  well.  “I”  was  somehow
part  of  his  evolution,  his  inquiry,  as  much  as  he  was  part  of  mine.  Other
forces  were  involved  in  guiding  the  merge—but  don't  ask  me  who  or  what
they  are.  As  Gurdjieff  noted,  “All  the  phenomena  of  the  life  of  a  given
cosmos,  examined  from  another  cosmos,  assume  a  completely  different
aspect  and  have  a  completely  different  meaning.”  He  also  said:  “The
manifestation  of  the  laws  of  one  cosmos  in  another  cosmos  constitute  what
we call a miracle.”

There might be validity in the idea that the demons or spirits “are attracted to
the music.” The disembodied splendor of their higher-dimensional realm may
bore  them  after  a  while.  Through  communion  with  a  human  being,  a  spirit
from  the  supersensible  realms  gets  to  smell,  taste,  love,  fuck,  all  our  sense-
realm experiences. On our side, perhaps we can utilize some tiny aspect of its
higher  vision  and  its  powers—of  course  I  don't  know,  at  this  point,  exactly
what for, but perhaps that remains to be revealed at some other time.

I  studied  the  DPT  reports  on  the  Internet  with  more  care.
Several  of  the  DPT  takers  went  to  the  same  place  as  me:  “I
felt as if DPT were a sinister, sinister being that was laughing
at me. Humans are so weak. DPT destroys you,” wrote one of
them.

If the universe has a spiritual design, perhaps the soul is like a widget running
along  a  conveyor  belt,  having  new  devices  added  to  it  or  taken  away  as  it
passes through various incarnations which are stages in its education. In my
dream, the DPT demiurge came into my house and said to me: “I used to live
here.”  There  was  a  strong  feeling  of  familiarity  to  the  episode.  Perhaps,  in
some  previous  incarnation,  centuries  or  eons  or  even  worlds  ago,  we  once
made this same bargain. The incubus's memory just happens to be better, and
longer, than mine.

In my dream, the DPT demiurge came into my house and said
to me: “I used to live here”

I almost never buy clothes, but on the plane to Berlin, I began to see myself
wearing  a  deep  red  or  purple  velvet  Vivienne  Westwood  suit  with  an
Edwardian cut to it. I thought how cool looking and comfortable such a suit
could be, and even sketched myself wearing it. It was nothing like my normal


background image

dressing  style.  On  the  plane  back  to  New  York,  I  was  reminded  of  the  suit
again.  A  week  later,  in  SoHo,  I  happened  to  walk  past  the  Vivienne
Westwood boutique. Down in the basement, they were having a sample sale.
I found one copy of the exact suit I had been thinking of, in deep crimson. I
put it on. It fit. At 70 percent off, I could even afford it.

3. Magical Thinking

Before  taking  DPT,  I  had  started  to  reread  Carlos  Castaneda's  books  on  his
relationship  with  the  Yaqui  sorcerer  Don  Juan.  I  anticipated  writing
dismissively of Castaneda as a phony anthropologist who perpetuated a fraud.
As  Jay  Courtney  Fikes  writes  in  Carlos  Castaneda,  Academic  Opportunism
and  the  Psychedelic  Sixies,  “Castaneda's  claims  that  he  was  a  sorcerer's
apprentice,  and  that  Don  Juan's  teachings  constituted  a  “Yaqui  way  of
knowledge” are unsupported by photographs, field notes, or tape recordings.”
Fikes believes that Castaneda simply recognized a good marketing niche and
cashed in.

After  DPT,  however,  Castaneda's  depictions  of  the  sorcerer's  world  seemed
plausibly  insightful.  Don  Juan  reveals  the  alternative  worlds  shown  through
psychedelics  as  tricks-of-the-eye  universes,  whole  realms  of  otherness
revealed  in  mirror-scratches  or  the  shadow-throwing  flickers  of  candle
flames. These are parallel dimensions of beings at once extremely threatening
and powerful, and on the other hand, evanescent and ephemeral. Don Juan's
sorcery  is  a  dangerous  pursuit  of  knowledge  that  the  sorcerer  considers
ultimately  meaningless.  “Seeing,”  as  Don  Juan  embodies  it,  requires
detachment towards ordinary reality.

“A  man  who  follows  the  paths  of  sorcery  is  confronted  with  imminent
annihilation  every  turn  of  the  way,  and  unavoidably  he  becomes  keenly
aware  of  his  own  death,”  Don  Juan  says.  “The  idea  of  imminent  death,
instead of becoming an obsession, becomes an indifference.” Through DPT, I
thought  I  saw  such  a  jaded  path  open  up  towards  amoral  knowledge  and
power. What was most frightening was its seductiveness.

I  could  no  longer  argue  with  the  idea  of  ambivalent  spirit-realms  with  the
power  to  suddenly  overflow  into  this  one.  The  rules  of  navigating  in  these
realms may be, as Don Juan lays them out, extremely specific and seemingly
arbitrary. Without a guide, the dangers for the integrity of the psyche may be


background image

as imposing as the knowledge to be gained.

Post-DPT,  I  started  to  examine  the  occult  tradition  of  the  West.  Impressed
with  Charity's  deft  handling  of  the  Tarot,  I  found  myself  peering  into  the
somewhat  unhinged  writings  of  Aleister  Crowley.  Like  Castaneda  and  the
occult  in  general,  I  thought  of  Crowley  as  mere  adolescent  entertainment.
Alas for me, I could no longer dismiss him so easily. The DPT journey—and
its  aftermath—transformed  Crowley's  work,  and  Castaneda's,  from  spooky
fantasy to strict realism.

Crowley's  scholarly  endeavor  was  to  make  a  scientific  system  of
correspondences  between  the  mystical  traditions,  linking,  for  instance,  the  I
Ching  and  Egyptian  mysticism  and  the  Tarot.  “The  laws  of  magick  are
closely  related  to  those  of  other  physical  sciences,”  he  wrote.  He  laid  out  a
model  of  the  cosmos  with  many  higher  dimensions  and  endless  beings
inhabiting them, made of subtler stuff than us. “It is one magical hypothesis
that  all  things  are  made  up  of  ten  different  sorts  of  vibrations,  each  with  a
different vibration, and each corresponding to a ‘pianet.’” This theory—based
on  the  Sephiroth,  the  ten  emanations  of  God  in  the  Qaballah—has  a  neat
poetic  resonance  with  modern  “superstring  theory”  in  physics,  which
postulates ten (or eleven) dimensions of space-time.

In the 1920s, Crowley wrote, “Magick deals principally with certain physical
forces still unrecognized by the vulgar; but those forces are just as real, just
as  material—if  indeed  you  can  call  them  so,  for  all  things  are  ultimately
spiritual—as  properties  like  radio-activity,  weight  and  hardness.”  Crowley
considered the Tarot, based on the Tree of Life from the Qaballah, to be an
accurate model of the forces and spiritual hierarchies at play in the universe
—a tool given to us by higher-dimensional forces.

In  the  1920s,  Crowley  wrote,  “Magick  deals  principally  with
certain physical forces still unrecognized by the vulgar; but those
forces are just as real, just as material-if indeed you can call them
so,  for  all  things  are  ultimately  spiritual-as  properties  like  radio-
activity, weight and hardness.”

Most  people  in  the  modern  world  reject  the  possibility  that  the  self  might
have  occult  and  transcendental  dimensions  that  are  carefully  hidden  by
ordinary  life.  The  possibility  that  such  knowledge  exists,  and  that  you  can
receive  direct  experience  of  it,  through  psychedelics  or  other  means,  is


background image

upsetting,  even  frightening.  I  now  suspect  that  this  might  be  the  central
reason  that  psychedelics  have  been  strenuously  suppressed  by  mainstream
society, and rejected by psychiatry. As T.S. Eliot wrote, “human kind cannot
bear very much reality.”

All  of  Carl  Jung's  researches  led  him  to  conclude  that  the  unconscious  as  it
was  revealed  through  psychoanalysis  had  occult  and  even  paranormal
dimensions.  Freud,  despite  his  courage  and  brilliance,  could  not  accept  this
possibility.  He  once  confessed  to  Jung,  as  Jung  described  in  The
Undiscovered  Self,  “that  it  was  necessary  to  make  a  dogma  of  his  sexual
theory  because  this  was  the  sole  bulwark  of  reason  against  a  possible
“outburst of the black flood of occultism.”

In these words Freud was expressing his conviction that the unconscious still
harbored many things that might lead themselves to “occult” interpretations,
as  is  in  fact  the  case....  It  is  this  fear  of  the  unconscious  psyche  which  not
only  impedes  self-knowledge  but  is  the  gravest  obstacle  to  a  wider
understanding and knowledge of psychology.

Jung  believed  that,  ultimately,  the  individual  cannot  achieve  true  awareness
without  reckoning  with  the  occult  domains  of  the  psyche  (which  does  not
mean they have to literally conjure up demons). He looked at the metaphors
for the quest for self-knowledge hidden in Gnosticism, and in alchemy, where
the  injunction,  “Visit  the  interior  of  the  earth,”  referred  to  techniques  of
seeking  transcendent  knowledge  and  power  by  delving  into  different
modalities of consciousness.

The  roots  of  European  alchemy  can  be  found  in  Gnosticism,  a  heretical
offshoot of Christianity that flourished in the first centuries AD. The Gnostic
version of Christ  is something like  a Leary-like advocate  for direct spiritual
experience over faith. In the “Gospel of Thomas,” one of a group of Gnostic
texts discovered in a jar in the Nag Hammadi desert at the end of the Second
World War, Christ said, “Open the door for yourself, so you will know what
is.”  In  that  same  text,  which  may  predate  the  Biblical  scriptures  and  equal
them  in  authenticity,  Christ  also  announced,  “If  you  bring  forth  what  is
within you, what you bring forth will save you. If you do not bring forth what
is within you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you.” Either of those
phrases could stand as a psychedelic credo.

The hierarchies of invisible beings I had seen on DPI—as if I was a reflecting


background image

surface,  a  mirror  for  them  to  display  and  even  preen  themselves—now
seemed  to  be  present  everywhere.  Walking  in  a  community  garden  on  East
Houston Street, featuring flowering paths and a small pond with turtles in it, I
saw  emanations  of  that  higher-order  occult  dimension  in  the  swooping
flourishes of rare flowers, in the pseudo-psychedelic patterns traced across a
turtle's scaly skin. It was suddenly obvious to me that the Darwinian theory of
evolution,  the  Western  rational  perspective  on  world  biology,  with  all  of  its
flaws and gaps, could not be the whole story. It was true to a limited extent,
but  there  were  other  truths  as  well.  Life  on  earth  has  been  sculpted  into
multitudinous forms by higher-dimensional beings for the enjoyment of their
own skill and our delight. As I watched a turtle's eye rotate in its socket, I had
to admit that they were master craftsmen.

As I was reading about the Qaballah and the Western occult tradition, feeling
oppressed by Crowley's histrionic tone, I ran into an old friend of mine who
had  moved  to  San  Francisco  and  was  just  in  town  for  a  few  weeks.  I  had
known  Neil  in  New  York  for  many  years.  We  had  shared  an  insatiable
appetite for New York parties, art openings, and the pursuit of girls.

Neil  seemed  unchanged  after  five  years.  Thin  and  narrow,  he  wore  antique
suits  and  patterned  ties,  looking  a  bit  like  an  ascetic  Missionary  from  the
1940s on his first mission into the jungle. It turned out that Neil had become
deeply involved in the work of Rudolf Steiner. Steiner was an Austrian-born
visionary and occultist from the turn of the century. Neil was even living in a
Steiner-inspired  Church  in  the  Bay  Area.  I  knew  nothing  about  Steiner,
besides  the  fact  he  had  created  schools  and  founded  something  called
Anthroposophy.

Although  he  no  longer  took  drugs  or  even  alcohol,  Neil's  interest  in
spirituality and mysticism had received an initial push through psychedelics.
He described a DMT trip where he shot through a tunnel whose walls were
covered  with  fast-changing  runic  script  and  visual  symbols.  “Then  I  looked
up and I saw these guys hovering over me, smirking and winking at me and
probing their fingers into my brain. Some of them looked like King Neptune,
with  tridents  and  long  curly  beards.”  Then  a  woman  in  a  yellow  dress  flew
down  in  front  of  him.  She  was  carrying  a  glowing  tablet,  and  on  that  tablet
Neil could see symbols that were changing. “The symbols of all the world's
spiritual  traditions  were  there—Native  American  symbols,  mandalas,  and
Jewish  Stars  and  everything  else.  She  was  showing  me  all  of  the  world's


background image

mystical paths in symbolic form.”

Steiner  wrote.  “Here,  however,  we  must  imagine  these
thoughts  as  living,  independent  beings.  What  we  grasp  as  a
thought  in  the  material  world  is  like  a  shadow  of  a  thought
being that is active in the land of spirits.”

A  few  years  later,  a  musician  friend  turned  Neil  onto  anthroposophy.  He
recognized  the  beings  he  had  seen  on  DMT  as  the  “Elemental  Beings”
described by Steiner. These nonphysical or “supersensible” beings live within
all the processes of nature and help with the work of creating and maintaining
the  physical  universe.  They  are  related  to  the  gnomes,  nyads,  dryads,  and
slyphs seen by country people throughout history. Many people have reported
making contact with such beings through psychedelics. For Steiner, a natural
clairvoyant,  they  were  just  a  small  part  of  a  vast  order  of  supersensible
entities he encountered through his own visionary experiences.

“Steiner believes that opposing forces act on human beings all the time,” Neil
told me. “One of these forces he calls “Luciferian,” which is not evil, but it is
the  force  that  pulls  us  away  from  physical  reality,  upwards  into  dream  and
fantasy, visionary realms and intellectual theories. There is an opposing force
which  pulls  us  down  towards  the  earth,  towards  the  mineral  aspect  of  the
physical body and death, and keeps us from awareness of spiritual reality. As
human  beings,  we  should  strive  to  achieve  balance  between  these  different
forces.  Psychedelic  drugs  are  totally  Luciferian.  They  give  access  to  worlds
that you may not be ready to see.”

“Don't you think that it depends on the individual?” I asked. “After all, you
probably  wouldn't  have  found  your  way  to  Steiner  if  it  wasn't  for
psychedelics.”

“Obviously  the  drugs  are  here  for  a  reason,  but  that  doesn't  mean  they  are
good  for  us.  The  beings  we  meet  on  psychedelics  may  not  have  our  best
interests  at  heart.”  He  quoted  a  song  lyric  from  the  British  post-punk  band,
Magazine: “My mind ain't so open that anything can crawl right in.”

I  immediately  started  reading  Steiner's  work.  Steiner  believed  that  different
types of spiritual training were appropriate for different epochs. He called the
spiritual  consciousness  of  the  ancient  world  and  the  shaman  a  “dusk-like
clairvoyance.”  In  the  present  world,  according  to  Steiner,  that  type  of


background image

consciousness  was  no  longer  appropriate.  He  devised  a  method  of  spiritual
training  based  on  meditations  and  cognition,  using  the  highly  developed
thinking power of the modern mind to rediscover the lost spiritual realms.

According  to  Steiner,  in  the  spiritual  worlds,  beings  are  not  separate  from
each other as they are in the physical world. He writes, “To have knowledge
of a sense-perceptible being means to stand outside it and assess it according
to  external  impressions.  To  have  knowledge  of  a  spiritual  being  through
intuition means having become completely at one with it, having united with
its  inner  nature.”  In  other  words,  you  meet  a  spiritual  being  by  temporarily
becoming  that  being.  This  suggests  the  effects  of  ingesting  psychedelic
compounds, which give the sense of temporarily melding into the psyche of
an “Other.”

The higher spiritual realms consist of beings made entirely of thought: “The
actual  world  of  thoughts  is  what  pervades  everything  in  the  land  of  spirits,
like  the  warmth  that  pervades  all  earthly  things  and  beings,”  Steiner  wrote.
“Here,  however,  we  must  imagine  these  thoughts  as  living,  independent
beings. What we grasp as a thought in the material world is like a shadow of
a thought being that is active in the land of spirits.”

Steiner describes a hierarchy of consciousness, from the lowest pebble to the
highest  spiritual  being.  On  earth,  a  person  who  achieved  truly  rational
consciousness  (of  course,  for  Steiner,  rationality  would  include  spiritual
awareness)  would  be  at  the  highest  level  of  thought  that  we  can  imagine,
while  minerals  exist  at  the  lowest  level  of  mental  activity  (for  mystics,  it
seems that nothing, not even a pebble, is completely devoid of sentience). In
the higher realms, you find beings whose lowest level of existence is rational
thought:  “Rational  conclusions  are  the  approximate  equivalent  of  mineral
effects  on  Earth.  Beyond  the  domain  of  intuition  lies  the  domain  where  the
cosmic plan is fashioned out of spiritual causes.”

In  1997,  largely  inspired  by  the  jewel-like  multicolored  landscapes  I  beheld
with  eyes  closed  on  several  mushroom  trips,  I  decided  to  go  to  Nepal.  The
prismatic  fast-changing  psilocybin  scenes  seemed  direct  evocations  of
“Buddha  Realms,”  those  sumptuous  paradisiacal  lands  ruled  over  by
enlightened unearthly beings, described in many Buddhist texts. After a few
visits,  I  found  myself  drawn  towards  the  stylized  and  highly  ornamented
artifacts  of  Tibetan  art,  the  tangka  paintings  and  mandalas  used  as  aid  to


background image

meditation.

I  had  picked  up  a  lung  infection  during  a  Shiva  festival  in
Kathmandu. To celebrate Shiva, the city with the third worst
air quality in the world burnt fires of garbage all night long

With  the  money  I  made  writing  a  never-published  article  about  visiting  a
slightly  embarrassing  “Free  Love  Summer  Camp”  in  the  Oregon  woods,  I
booked  a  ticket  to  Kathmandu,  a  city  of  crumbling  Hindu  temples,  ancient
stone  streets,  and  dire  poverty.  I  thought,  perhaps,  that  Tibetan  Buddhism
might be a path for me. I visited several temples and monasteries. The solemn
rituals  of  chanting  monks  and  the  stylized  slow-motion  pageantry  of  the
costumed  dances  to  celebrate  Losar,  the  Tibetan  New  Year,  were  beautiful.
But I didn't like the hierarchical and non-detached feeling of the Westerners
who clustered around the high-powered Lamas.

From  Nepal,  I  went  to  Dharmsala,  the  headquarters  of  the  Dalai  Lama  and
Tibet's government-inexile, in Northern India. I appreciated the smiling faces
and earthy warmth of the Tibetans—monks and commoners—but I was once
again put off by the graspiness radiated by the Westerners. I had picked up a
lung infection during a Shiva festival in Kathmandu—to celebrate Shiva, the
city  with  the  third  worst  air  quality  in  the  world  burnt  fires  of  garbage  all
night  long—and  spent  a  week  coughing,  waiting  for  either  the  Indian
antibiotics or Tibetan homeopathic remedies to take effect.

By accident, I was in India at the time of the Hindu festival Kumbh Mehla.
Kumbh  Mehla  is  in  the  Guinness  Book  of  World  Records  as  the  largest
gathering of people in the world. Every three years, around 20 million people
go to bathe in the River Ganges on one of three auspicious dates. At first, I
thought  the  combination  of  Indian  crowds  and  bad  sanitation  would  make
Kumbh Mehla the last place I ever wanted to go. Finally, sick of the Tibetan
Buddhist circus, I decided to check it out.

The  festival  turned  out  to  be  well  managed  and  orderly,  despite  its  vast
numbers. It was a joyful, almost Biblical, spectacle. I stayed in Rishikesh, a
holy city of pastel-colored ashrams, the place where the Beatles went in the
'60s to study Transcendental Meditation with The Maharishi. Rishikesh was
idyllic and vegetarian. Clans of Hindus dressed in bright colors and flowing
robes paraded cheerfully through the narrow, car-less streets. Kumbh Mehla
also attracts saddhus from all over India; these yellow-robed, trident-carrying


background image

followers of Shiva range from sincere devotees to smirking shysters eager to
extract  donations,  pick  up  chicks,  or  sell  ganga  to  tourists.  I  stayed  at  a
rundown ashram for Westerners, run by a laidback bald guru in his nineties.
The  ashram  cost  $1  a  night,  including  breakfast,  and  for  another  dollar  you
could  attend  yoga  and  meditation  classes  spaced  throughout  the  day.
Hinduism seemed sloppier, more open than Tibetan Buddhism. Hanging out
on the banks of the Ganges—clean to swim in because of its proximity to its
source in the Himalayas—old holy men in long grey beards would come up
to  converse  with  me  in  broken  English  about  the  nearness  of  God.  Wild
monkeys  chattered  in  the  trees.  A  pilgrim  in  the  streets  stopped  to  tell  me,
sincerely, that he was sure we had known each other in an earlier life.

Kumbh Mehla marks a mythological event. Long ago, the Gods were fighting
over a vial containing the nectar of immortality. Four drops of this nectar fell
into  the  Ganges  at  the  four  spots  where  Kumbh  Mehla  is  held  every  three
years, on certain dates that have astrological significance. If you bathe in the
Ganges  during  the  right  moment  of  the  festival,  you  wipe  away  the  bad
karma, like a psychic crust, accumulated over all of your past lives.

The actual festival was held, that year, in the nearby and equally festive town
of  Haridwar.  On  the  auspicious  mornings,  hordes  of  devotees  clustered  for
miles up and down the riverbanks. On the first festival day, I did not go in the
water myself, but I witnessed a riot of the Naga Babas. The Naga Babas are
the  most  extreme  and  ascetic  clan  of  Saddhus.  Most  of  them  live  in  caves
high in the Himalayas, coming down for the festival once every three years.
They  parade—naked,  carrying  weapons,  covered  in  grey  ash—through  the
town  before  entering  the  water.  They  are  followed  by  gurus  from  across
India,  on  chariots,  surrounded  by  their  disciples.  Among  the  Nagas,  self-
mortification is de rigeur. As they paraded, I saw that some of them had cut
the tendons in their penises to prevent erections. Others had one arm raised in
the air—they had stayed like that for years, until the appendage was thin and
shriveled.  By  tradition,  the  Nagas  entered  the  water  first,  to  be  followed  by
the  Hindu  hordes.  I  never  understood  why  they  were  rioting—it  had
something to do with the exact order in which they would enter the water—
but  I  watched  as  those  emaciated  mystics  picked  up  large  rocks  from  the
street and hurled  them into the  crowds. They charged  around, menacing  the
police  with  their  weapons.  I  cowered  in  a  restaurant,  watching  the  melee
through the metal grate that the proprietors had quickly pulled down.


background image

I was so fascinated by the spectacle surrounding Kumbh Mehla that I put off
my  return  flight.  I  spent  several  more  weeks  in  Rishikesh,  trying  to  learn
yoga.  On  the  next  auspicious  morning,  I  found  myself  luckily  wedged  into
the  center  of  Haridwar  right  across  from  the  Nagas.  This  time,  at  the  right
instant, I joined the joyful multitudes bobbing up and down in the clear blue
Ganges water.

The  Naga  Babas  are  the  most  extreme  and  ascetic  clan  of
Saddhus.  Most  of  them  live  in  caves  high  in  the  Himalayas,
coming  down  for  the  festival  once  every  three  years.  Among
the  Nagas,  self-mortification  is  de  rigeur.  As  they  paraded,  I
saw that some of them had cut the tendons in their penises to
prevent erections.

Of course, at that point, I did not believe in karma.

Although  he  was  an  esoteric  Christian,  Steiner  believed,  along  with  Hindus
and Buddhists, that human beings pass through many incarnations (84,000 is
the  average,  according  to  the  Hindus).  Health  problems  and  personal  crises
that  manifest  along  the  way  are  actually  the  residues  of  one's  actions,  the
karma accrued in past lives. He also thought that, through spiritual training, it
is possible to remember your past incarnations—as the Buddha did when he
achieved enlightenment, recollecting all of his lives up to that instant.

“It  is  often  asked  why  we  do  not  know  anything  of  our  experiences  before
birth and after death,” Steiner wrote. “This is the wrong question. Rather, we
should  ask  how  we  can  attain  such  knowledge.”  At  the  moment  my
provisional  belief—stitched  together  from  Buddhism,  Western  mysticism,
quantum physics and psychedelic shamanism—is that what we experience as
the  “self”  is  actually  a  kind  of  vibration  or  frequency  emitted  from  an
invisible whole that exists in a higher dimension. Buddhists see this reality as
somehow a manifestation of our consciousness, our karma. If that is the case,
then the only way to change the world is to transform our consciousness.

Accepting  Steiner's  ideas  for  a  moment,  my  actions  over  the  last  years,
however  much  they  seemed  self-willed  and  haphazard,  began  to  reveal  a
certain  order  to  them,  from  an  esoteric  perspective.  After  Kumbh  Mehla,  I
went, due to the “lucky draw” of a magazine assignment, through the Bwiti
initiation  in  Africa,  then  I  drank  ayahuasca  with  Don  Caesario  and  the
Secoya. After DPT, I was forced to revise my thoughts yet again. I began to


background image

comprehend the ambiguous reality and power of occult realms. The DPT trip
and  its  aftermath  seemed  strange,  yet  eerily  familiar—I  felt,  I  still  feel,  as
though  I  had  activated  some  circuit  of  Nietzschean  “eternal  recurrence,”
entering some realm I had inhabited before.

According  to  Steiner,  along  with  the  self  that  we  perceive  in  daily  life,  the
intractable  “I,”  there  is  another  self,  a  hidden  spiritual  being,  which  is  the
individual's guide and guardian. This higher self “does not make itself known
through thoughts or inner words. It acts through deeds, processes, and events.
It is this “other self” that leads the soul through the details of its life destiny
and evokes its capacities, tendencies, and talents.” The direction of our life is
set out by that other self, a permanent being which continues from life to life.
“This  inspiration  works  in  such  a  way  that  the  destiny  of  one  earthly  life  is
the  consequence  of  the  previous  lives.”  The  pull  of  these  far-flung  archaic
rites in India, Gabon, and the Amazon had exerted something like a magnetic
attraction, and seeking out these experiences, perhaps I was prodded along by

some hidden, higher aspect of my being. 


background image

ICONS


background image

KICK THAT HABIT: Brion Gysin-His Life &

Magick

MICHAEL GOSS

“Inside the village the thatched houses crouch low in their gardens to hide
in the deep cactus lined lanes. You come through their maze to the broad
village  green  where  the  pipes  are  piping;  50  raitas  banked  against  a
crumbling  wall  blow  sheet  lightning  to  shatter  the  sky.  Fifty  wild  flutes
blow  up  a  storm  in  front  of  them,  while  a  platoon  of  small  boys  in  long
belted white robes  and brown wool  turbans drum like  young thunder. All
the villagers dressed in best white, swirl in great coils and circles
  around
one wildman in skins.”  (Gysin  from  sleeve  notes  of  Brian Jones Presents
the Pipes of Pan at Jajouka, Rolling Stones Records, 1972).

Brion Gysin was born in Taplow, Bucks (England) on January 19th, 1916. He
later commented on this: “Certain traumatic events have led me to conclude
that  at  the  moment  of  birth  I  was  delivered  to  the  wrong  address.”  After  an
education in Canada and the UK, he moved to Paris in 1934 to study at the
Sorbonne. As a young painter he associated with many important literary and
artistic figures, on the look-out, as always for something worth exploring and
it  was  not  long  before  he  was  introduced  to  and  later  joined  the  Surrealist
movement. Gysin was a lot younger than most of the others involved and was
therefore  an  outsider  from  the  start.  He  was  soon  in  conflict  with  Andre
Breton,  and  when  he  arrived  at  the  opening  of  his  first  group  exhibition,  he
found  Paul  Eluard  taking  down  one  of  his  pictures,  a  depiction  of  a  calf's
head  wearing  a  perraque,  which  bore  a  striking  resemblance  to  Breton
himself. After a few months Gysin was expelled from the Surrealist circle. He
learnt from this the dangers of being too fixed in one's ideas.

I too am not a theoretician and don't hold any particularly strong
views about anything, in fact my own past experience of literary
and  painting  groups  has  always  been  that  this  is  bad  news—it's
better not to have such views.”


background image

After  this  period  in  Paris,  Gysin  visited  Greece  and  then  Algeria,  his  first
contact with the Sahara and Arab culture. He returned to Paris briefly and at
the age of 23 had his first one-man show to critical acclaim. It was 1939 and
the approaching war forced him to take refuge in New York, associating there
with other exiled Surrealists, including Max Ernst, Roberto Matta and Renne
Crevelle.  Whilst  in  New  York  he  worked  as  assistant  to  Irene  Sharaff  on
seven  Broadway  musicals  and  became  friendly  with  composer  John
Latouche.  Latouche's  secretary  at  the  time  was  married  to  William
Burroughs, although Gysin and Burroughs did not meet until years later. Also
through  Latouche,  he  met  the  medium  Eileen  Garrett,  who  was  quite  a
celebrity. This was one of his first magical contacts and there is no doubt that
it aroused his interest in such things.

Gysin  was  averse  to  Burroughs'  heroin  addiction.  It  was  not
until  1958  that  Gysin  ran  into  Burroughs  again  in  Paris.
Burroughs' first words were “Wanna score?”

Brion Gysin with hand scratched permutation poem of the elemental


background image

linguistic  source  of  creation  in  the  universe  “I  AM  THAT  I  AM.”
These  slides  were  projected  onto  Gysin's  body  during  multi-media
performances with the “Domain Poetique” in Paris during the 1960s.
From the collection of Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

Gysin  gave  up  his  Broadway  job  to  become  a  welder  in  the  Bayonne
shipyards, New Jersey, until he was drafted into the Canadian army. He was
still  painting  and  his  travels  between  Miami  and  Havana  inspired  some
abstract visions and aerial landscapes of Florida bathing in the Gulf Stream.
In  the  army  a  short  time,  he  was  chosen  to  learn  Japanese  for  Intelligence
purposes. “This,” he said, “was the most important thing, it had a great deal
of  influence  on  my  attitude  towards  surface,  attacks  of  ink  onto  paper  and
brushwork, which has very much applied to my painting ever since.”

In 1946, at the end of his army career, his first book was published by Eileen
Garrett,  To  Master  A  Long  Goodnight,  which  won  Gysin  a  Fulbright
Fellowship to research in France and Spain.

It  was  on  a  trip  to  Morocco  with  the  writer  Paul  Bowles  that  he  first
encountered  the  magic  and  mystery  of  the  indigenous  culture.  He  was
entranced and lived there on and off for the next 23 years. On a rainy day in
Tangier, during an exhibition of his paintings:

“Burroughs  wheeled  into  the  exhibition,  arms  and  legs  flailing,
talking  a  mile  a  minute.  We  found  he  looked  very  Occidental,
more  private-eye  than  Inspector  Lee;  he  trailed  long  vines  of
Bannisteria  Caapi  from  the  upper  Amazon  after  him  and  old
bullfight  posters  fluttered  out  from  under  his  old  trench  coat
instead of a shirt. An odd blue light flashed around the rim of his
hat.  All  he  wanted  to  talk  about  was  his  trip  to  the  Amazon  in
search of Yage, the hallucinogenic drug. It was said to make you
telepathic.  I  felt  right  away  that  he  didn't  need  too  much  of  that
stuff  and  I  may  well  have  launched  into  my  story  of  how  the
“Telephone Arabe” works in Tangier but I'm sure he didn't want
to listen at the time. Our exchange
 of ideas came many years later
in Paris.”

Although  they  both  lived  in  Tangier  at  the  time,  Burroughs  often  eating  in
Gysin's restaurant The 1001 Nights, they kept a wide berth; Gysin was averse
to  Burroughs'  heroin  addiction.  It  was  not  until  1958  that  Gysin  ran  into


background image

Burroughs again in Paris. Burroughs' first words were “Wanna score?” This
chance  meeting  led  to  four  years  of  collaboration  creating  what  they  called
“The  Third  Mind,”  discovering  “Cut-ups,”  inventing  the  Dream  Machine
with  Ian  Sommerville,  and  making  several  films  with  Antony  Balch.  They
were  resident  at  the  legendary  “Beat  Hotel”  on  the  Rue  Git-le-Coeur,  and
made frequent trips to London.

Throughout the 1960s and 70s, Gysin involved himself in many projects. He
made  two  recordings  of  his  “Machine  Poetry”  for  BBC  radio  and  was
associated  with  Jean  Clarence  Lambert's  “Domaine  Poetique.”  There  were
exhibitions of his work in Europe, Scandinavia, Morocco, USA, Mexico and
Japan.  He  wrote  several  more  books  and  collections  of  stories.  In  1969  he
took Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones to Jajouka to record the music from
the Pipes of Pan ritual, and published his most important book, The Process.

During  the  early  1980s  he  was  still  active  and  made  an  appearance  at  the
Final  Academy  series  of  events  in  London  1982,  giving  readings  from  his
books. He died on July 13th, 1986 in Paris after a long illness.

THE DREAM MACHINE

After  leaving  North  Africa  Gysin  went  first  to  London  where  he  sold  some
paintings  of  the  Sahara  and  then  back  to  Paris  where  he  “ran  into  a  grey-
green Burroughs in the Place St. Michel. Wanna score? For the first time in
all the years I had known him, I really scored with him.” This chance meeting
with  Burroughs  led  to  four  years  of  collaboration  on  many  projects.  One  of
the most important of these projects was the Dream Machine.

Gysin's  first  experience  of  the  phenomenon  that  led  to  the  discovery  of  the
Dream Machine came when he was riding down an avenue of trees at sunset.
He wrote in his journal:

“Had  a  transcendental  storm  of  colour  visions  today  in  a  bus
going down to Marseille. We ran through a long avenue of trees
and  I  closed  my  eyes  against  the  setting  sun.  An  overwhelming
flood of intensely bright patterns in supernatural colors exploded
behind my eyelids; a multi-dimensional kaleidoscope whirling out
through space. I was swept out of time. I was in a world of infinite
number the vision stopped abruptly as we left the tree.” 21.12.58.


background image

A couple of years later in Paris, Burroughs bought a book called The Living
Brain  by  Dr.  W.  Grey  Walter,  and  passed  it  on  to  Gysin.  Inside  this  book
there was a long account of the scientific study of the effects of flickering or
flashing  light  on  the  human  mind.  Grey  Walter  discovered  that  flicker  at
certain  rates  synchronized  with  brain  waves  to  give  strange  visions  of  color
and  pattern.  Gysin  immediately  realized  what  had  happened  during  his  bus
ride some time before.

In The Living Brain, Grey Walter defines the wave bands as follows:

Delta

0.5-3.5 cycles per second (c/s)

Theta

4.0-7.0 c/s

Alpha

8.0-13 c/s

Beta

14.0-30 c/s

Grey  Walter  discovered  the  strangest  effects  were  achieved  on  the  Alpha
band. He began by using a strobe light:

“The flash rate could be changed quickly by turning the knob and at certain
frequencies  the  rhythmic  series  of  flashes  appeared  to  be  breaking  down
some of the physiological barriers between the different regions of the brain
(Breakthrough in Grey Room, Burroughs).”

This  meant  that  the  stimulus  of  the  flicker  received  in  the  visual  projection
area  of  the  cortex  of  the  brain  was  breaking  bounds;  its  ripples  were
overflowing  into  other  areas.  The  consequent  alteration  of  rhythms  in  other
parts  of  the  brain  could  be  observed  from  moment  to  moment  even  by  an
amateur, as the red ink pen of the automatic analyzer flicked its new patterns
caused by the changing flicker frequencies reproducing the effect of them in
one channel after another. Walter discovered his subjects were experiencing
“Strange  feelings,  a  faintness  or  swimming  in  the  head;  some  became
unconscious for a few moments” and not only that, they were seeing “a sort
of pulsating check or mosaic, often in bright colors” ... “others see whirling
spirals,  whirlpools,  explosions  and  Catherine  wheels”  ...  “feelings  of
swaying,  of  jumping,  even  of  spinning  and  dizziness  and  organized
hallucinations;  complete  scenes  as  in  dreams,  involving  more  than  one
sense.”  A  whole  range  of  emotions  were  experienced—fatigue,  confusion,
fear,  disgust  anger,  pleasure  ...  “sometimes  even  the  sense  of  time  is  lost  or


background image

distorted.”

Gysin was so impressed with what he read in Walter's book he wrote to lan
Sommerville,  then  at  Cambridge  University  studying  mathematics,  asking
him if it would be possible to make a machine like this at home? It was and
they  did  it  by  suspending  a  light  bulb  in  a  metal  or  card  cylinder  with  just
regular  slots  producing  a  fixed  rate  of  flicker;  this  was  driven  by  a  78-rpm
gramophone  turntable.  They  experimented  with  a  whole  series  of  dream-
machines from a very simple cylinder to, years later, machines which as the
closed  eyes  are  moved  along  the  height  of  the  column,  produce  all  the
gradations of the Alpha Band.

“Magick Square” watercolor and calligraphy on paper by Brion Gysin
1961. From the collection of Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

Brion Gysin's own experiments are similar to those Grey Walter reported in
his subjects:

“Visions start with a kaleidoscope of colors on a plane in front of
the  eyes  and  gradually  become  more  complex  and  beautiful,
breaking  like  surf  on  a  shore  until  whole  patterns  of  color  are
pounding  to  get  in.  After  a  while  the  visions  were  permanently


background image

behind  the  eyes  and  I  was  in  the  middle  of  a  whole  scene  with
limitless  patterns  being  generated  around  me.  There  was  an
almost unbearable feeling of spatial movement for a while but it
was  well  worth  getting  through  for  I  found  that  when  I  had
stopped I was high above the earth in a universal blaze of glory.”

Gysin connected his experience with Nostradamus, according to Gysin:

“Catherine de Medici had Nostradamus sitting on top of a tower
where with his fingers spread would flicker them over his closed
eyes  and  interpret  his  visions  in  a  way  which  influenced  her  to
regard political power as instruction from a higher power.”

His experience utterly changed the subject and style of his paintings. He often
painted  the  interiors  of  his  machine,  sometimes  inserting  whole  canvasses.
He would compliment this by listening to rhythmic Moroccan music while he
was viewing.

“In the Dream Machine nothing would seem to be unique, rather
the  elements  seen  in  endless  repetition,  leaping  out  through  the
numbers beyond number and back, show themselves thereby part
of the whole. This, surely, approaches the vision of which mystics
have  spoken  suggesting  as  they  did  that  it  was  a  unique
experience.”

Ian Sommerville also made a comparison to mystical experience. “Elaborate
geometric constructions of incredible intricacy build up from bright mosaics
into living fire-balls like the mandalas of eastern mysticism surprised in their
act  of  growth.”  “The  elements  of  pattern  which  have  been  recorded  by
subjects under flicker show a clear affinity with designs found in prehistoric
rock  carving,  painting  and  idols  of  a  world-wide  distribution:  India,
Czechoslovakia, Spain, Mexico, Norway and Ireland. They are also found in
the  arts  of  many  primitive  peoples  of  Australia,  Melanesia,  West  Africa,
South Africa, Central America and the Amazon.”

“Catherine  de  Medici  had  Nostradamus  sitting  on  top  of  a
tower  where  with  his  fingers  spread  would  flicker  them  over
his  closed  eyes  and  interpret  his  visions  in  a  way  which
influenced her to regard political power as instruction from a
higher power.”


background image

Gysin  took  out  a  patent  on  his  invention  in  July  1961.  Several  large  Dream
Machines were made, mostly ending up in private hands or art galleries, but
not  in  great  enough  numbers  to  become  the  drugless  turn-on  of  the  '60s  as
Gysin had once hoped. He saw the Dream Machine as a gateway to a higher
state of being. When talking about flicker, Grey Walter had written: “Perhaps
in a similar way our arboreal cousins, struck by the setting sun in the midst of
a  jungle  caper,  may  have  fallen  from  their  perch  sadder  but  wiser  apes.”
Gysin looked a stage further.

“One  ready  ape  hit  the  ground  and  the  impact  knocked  a  word
out  of  him.  Maybe  he  had  an  infected  throat.  He  spoke.  In  the
word  was  the  beginning.  He  looked  at  and  saw  the  world
differently.  He  was  one  changed  ape.  I  look  about  now  and  see
this  world  differently.  Colors  are  brighter  and  more  intense,
traffic lights at night glow like immense jewels. The ape became
man. It must be possible to become something more than man.”

MAGICK

Gysin's  first  encounter  with  magic  was  the  medium  Eileen  Garrett.  She  had
been  questioned  in  England  in  1920  under  the  Official  Secrets  Act  because
during a seance she had contacted the captain of the ill-fated British Airship
R101,  predicting  its  fate  with  great  accuracy.  They  were  introduced  by
Gysin's friend John Latouche, frequently attending her meetings together; as
recounted in Here to Go. He was well read in Greek and Roman mythology
and in the late '30s spent three years living in Greece. He later became very
much a 20th century Dionysian figure.

It was after his first visits to Morocco that magic became of great importance
to Gysin and became prominent in everything he created. Always willing to
take risks, Terry Wilson commented:

“Gysin had a tendency to like to dice and flirt with fear, he liked
to  be  afraid.  He  had  an  immense  amount  of  courage,  but  there
was  also  a  side  of  him  that  was  rather  timid  and  cautious.”
Further “He had always had a very powerful personality, he was
a person who had tremendous power over other people and could
certainly put people into a trance.”

Morocco has a long history of magic, especially before the coming of Islam.


background image

The indigenous Moorish people have their own Shamanic tradition, as well as
fertility cults and belief in Barakas or psychic power points. Many Mosques
are built on the spots much in the same way as some Christian churches were
sited on pagan sites. Some of this undercurrent survives in the Sufi tradition
and the Islamic Mystical Brotherhood, who believe that by using shamanistic
methods they can bring themselves closer to Allah.

While getting the restaurant ready one day I found a magical
object,  an  amulet  of  sorts,  a  rather  elaborate  one  with  seeds,
pebbles,  shards  of  broken  mirror,  seven  of  each  in  a  little
package along with a piece of writing.

In  1950  the  writer  Paul  Bowles  took  Gysin  to  a  festival  on  a  beach  just
outside Tangier. It was an old pagan festival based on the solar calendar. The
musicians  were  from  the  Ecstatic  brotherhoods  and  for  the  first  time  Gysin
saw large groups of people in trance. The musicians were said to be able to
heal  by  the  sound  of  their  instruments  alone.  This  music  captured  his
imagination and after years of searching he traced the musicians, with the aid
of the Moroccan painter Hamri, to Jajouka, a small village in the hills outside
Tangier.

Here  they  still  celebrated  an  ancient  Pan  festival,  a  version  of  the  Roman
Lupercalia. Originally this had been a race from a cave under the Capitoline
Hill;  goats  were  killed  and  a  young  man  chosen  to  be  sewn  into  the  bloody
warm  skins.  At  Jajouka  he  was  called  Bou  Jeloud,  the  father  of  skins,  the
father of fear.

In  ancient  Rome,  Mark  Anthony  was  chosen  to  run  the  race  on  the  Ides  of
March. The youth would run out of the city and into the forest to contact Pan,
the goat-foot god, sexuality itself. He would run back through the streets with
the news that Pan was still there fucking in the forest, all the time whipping
the  women  in  the  crowds.  In  Shakespeare's  play,  Julius  Caesar  asks  Mark
Anthony  “to  be  sure  to  hit  Calpurnia”  his  barren  wife.  Gysin  thought,
“Shakespeare dug right away that what it was, the point of sexual balance of
nature which was in question.”

Due  to  Islamic  influence  men  and  women  live  very  separate  lives  and  men
don't always understand women's language. In Jajouka the women sing secret
songs  enticing  Bou  Jeloud,  the  father  of  skins  to  come  to  the  hills  for  the
prettiest  girls,  “we  will  give  you  cross-eyed  Aisha;  we  will  give  you


background image

humpbacked, etc.” naming all the undesirable “beauties” of the village. Pan is
supposed  to  be  so  dumb  he  falls  for  this  and  will  fuck  anyone.  When  he
comes up to the village he is met by the feminine energy of the village in the
form  of  Aisha-Aisha  Homolka.  This  name  may  be  derived  from  Asherat  or
Astarte.  The  role  of  Bou  Jeloud  is  to  marry  her,  although  nowadays,  young
boys, dressed as girls, dance her role.

“Pan, the father of skins dances through moonlit nights in his hill
village  Jajouka,  to  the  wailing  of  his  hundred  master  magicians.
Down  in  town,  far  away  by  the  seaside  you  can  hear  the  wild
whimper  of  his  oboe-like  raita;  a  faint  breath  of  panic  borne  on
the  wind.  Below  the  rough  palisade  of  ginat  blue  cactus
surrounding the village on it hilltop the music flows in streams to
nourish and fructify the terraced fields below.” (Gysin)

After  Hamri's  introduction  to  these  master  musicians  and  many  visits  to
Jajouka, Gysin invited them to play in his restaurant, The 1001 Nights. For a
few years they did so until they fell out.

“I kept some notes and drawings meaning to write a recipe book
on magic. My Pan people were furious when they found out. They
poisoned  my  food  twice  then  resorted  to  more  efficacious  means
to  get  rid  of  me...  While  getting  the  restaurant  ready  one  day  I
found a magical object, an amulet of sorts, a rather elaborate one
with  seeds,  pebbles,  shards  of  broken  mirror,  seven  of  each  in  a
little package along with a piece of writing. When deciphered we
didn't  even  want  to  touch  it,  because  of  its  magical  qualities,
which even educated Moroccans acknowledged. The message was
written  from  right  to  left  across  the  paper,  which  had  then  been
turned and inscribed from top to bottom to form a cabbalistic (i.e.
with hidden meaning)
 grid calling on the devil of smoke to “make
Massa Brahim leave this house as smoke leaves the fire, never to
return...and within a very short time, I indeed lost the restaurant
and everything else.” (Here to Go, Terry Wilson)

A  short  while  before  this  John  and  Mary  Cooke  had  appeared  at  the  1001
Nights. They had sought Gysin out on the instruction of a Ouija board. John
Cooke  was  a  vastly  rich  man  born  of  a  wealthy  and  “far  out”  family  in
Hawaii. All his life he showed a great interest in magic and the occult. Before


background image

coming  to  Morocco  he  said  that  he  had  been  involved  in  a  “billion  buck
scam”  with  L.  Ron  Hubbard  called  Scientology.  The  Cookes  were
instrumental in its foundation and had presumably sought out Gysin in order
to incorporate him  into Scientology. They  claimed he was  a natural “Clear”
and  “Operating  Thetan.”  Gysin  was  friendly  towards  the  Cookes,  even
rushing to Algeria when John Cooke was stricken by a mysterious paralysis.

A civil war was brewing in Algeria and Gysin decided to leave North Africa
for Paris. Of his time in Morocco he reflected:

“Both  extra-ordinary  encounters  and  unusual  experiences  have
led  me  to  think  about  the  world  and  my  activity  in  a  way  that
came to be termed psychedelic. I've spent more than a third of my
life  in  Morocco  where  magic  is  or  was  a  matter  of  daily
occurrence ranging from simple poisoning to mystical experience.
I  have  tasted  a  pinch  of  both  along  with  other  fruits  of  life  and
that  changes  one's  life  at  least  somewhat.  Anyone  who  manages
to  step-out  of  his  own  culture  into  another,  can  stand  there
looking  back  at  his  own  under  another  light....  magic  calls  itself
the  other  method...practiced  more  assiduously  than  hygiene  in
Morocco,  though  ecstatic  dancing  to  the  music  of  the  secret
brotherhoods is there a form of psychic hygiene. You know your
music when you hear it one day; you fall into lie and dance until
you  pay  the  piper.  Inevitably  something  of  all  this  is  evident  in
what I do and the arts I practice.”

GYSIN IN PARIS

Gysin's  chance  meeting  with  William  Burroughs  led  to  four  years  of
collaboration  on  many  projects.  Based  at  the  Beat  Hotel,  they  were  both
certainly in the “right place at the same time.”

Gysin's painting in Paris was greatly influenced by the calligraphy contained
in  the  amulet  that  had  driven  him  from  Tangiers.  His  paintings  increasingly
became  formulas,  and  spells  intended  to  produce  very  specific  effects.
Burroughs,  who  was  recovering  from  heroin  addiction,  often  sat  in  whilst
Gysin  painted,  seeing  a  work  from  conception  to  completion.  “Brion”  he
said, “is risking his life and his sanity when he paints.”

With Islam, the world is a vast emptiness like the Sahara; events are written,


background image

predetermined.  Gysin's  works  became  “Written  deserts,”  appearing  from
right to left like Arabic, and from top to bottom like Japanese. Burroughs was
impressed, and in his essay on Gysin in Contemporary Artists wrote “It is to
be remembered that all art is magical in origin—sculpture, writing, painting
and  by  magical  I  mean  intended  to  produce  very  specific  results.  Paintings
were originally formulae to make what is painted happen.”

A  calligraphic  “spell”  by  Brion  Gysin  circa  1959/60.  Projected  onto
Gysin's body during his multimedia experiments as part of “Domain
Poetique”  in  Paris.  Breaking  the  boundary  between  word  and  body,
inner and outer projections of nonverbal meaning. From the collection
of Genesis Breyer P-Orridge

THE CUT-UP TECHNIQUE


background image

At  that  time  many  other  writers/painters  were  discovering  the  relationship
between  writing  and  painting.  Gysin's  ideas  on  the  magical-technological
approach to writing were, as Burroughs recognized, a way out of the identity
habit,  and  a  writing  that  eludes  time,  so  Gysin  thought,  was  still  50  years
behind painting in this respect. It was from this perspective that the “Cut-up”
technique was discovered.

“[...]  while  cutting  out  a  mount  for  a  drawing  in  room  #25;  I
sliced  through  a  pile  of  old  newspapers  ...and  thought  of  what  I
had  said  to  Burroughs  some  six  months  earlier  about  turning
painting  into  writing.  I  picked  up  the  raw  words  and  began  to
piece  together  texts  which  later  appeared  as  the  first  cut-ups  in
Minutes to Go.”

They  both  realized  the  importance  and  power  of  their  discovery  and  how
using  this  technique  they  could  disrupt  the  linear  time  sequence  of  writing
thereby  destroying  ordinary  patterns  of  conditioned  word  associations.  The
cut-ups  acted  as  an  agent  for  simultaneous  integration  and  disintegration,
imposing  another  path  on  the  eye  and  thought.  Allen  Ginsberg  wrote  “It
meant  literally  altering  consciousness  outside  of  what  was  already  the  fixed
habit  of  language-inner-thought-monologue-abstraction-mental  images-
symbol-mathematical abstraction.”

Gysin  and  Burroughs  saw  these  new  writings  as  spells:  “I  sum  on  the  little
folk-music from the Moroccan hills proves the great god Pan not dead. I cast
spells; all spells are sentences spelling out the work look that is you.” (Let the
Mice In, Gysin)

Burroughs himself said he

“[...] couldn't read them a second time as they produced a certain
kind  of  very  unhappy  psychic  effect.  They  were  the  sort  of  texts
that you might use for brainwashing somebody, or you might use
them for the control of an enormous number of people whom you
drove mad in one particular way by one sort of this application of
this  dislocation  of  language,  where  by  sort  of  breaking  off  all
their synaptic attachments to language you would maybe acquire
a  social  dominance  over  them  which  one  considered  completely
undesirable.”


background image

There is no doubt that these fears are justified as magical techniques are often
tested and used by intelligence agencies of all governments.

These  discoveries  were  not  confined  to  the  written  word.  They  also  used
tape-recorders  and  early  computers.  With  the  help  of  mathematician  Ian
Sommerville (1941-76) they produced permutation and machine poetry. The
permutation poems are acknowledged as influences by minimalist composers
Phillip  Glass,  Terry  Riley  and  Steve  Reich.  Some  of  these  influences  are
noticeable  in  the  live  performances  of  Throbbing  Gristle.  Some  of  this  is
documented by Burroughs in The Electronic Revolution and his LP Nothing
Here Now but the Recordings. With filmmaker Anthony Balch (1937-1980)
they  made  Towers  Open  Fire;  The  Cut  Ups;  Bill  and  Tony;  and  Dream
Machine.  When  watching  these  films  one  has  the  sensation  of  flashing
backwards and forwards in time creating a flurry of deja-vu experiences.

Gysin  and  Burroughs  together  had  created  what  they  termed  “The  Third
Mind”:

“Not  the  history  of  a  literary  collaboration  but  a  fusion  in  a
praxis of two subjectives that metamorphose into a third it is from
this  collusion  that  a  new  author  emerged  as  an  absent  third
person invisible and beyond grasp decoding the silence.”

During  their  time  together  staying  at  the  Beat  Hotel,  they  both  identified
themselves with Hassan I Sabbah—“The Old Man of the Mountain” who in
the  11th  century  terrified  establishment  Islam  from  a  mountain  fortress  at
Alamout  (in  Iran).  His  motto  “Nothing  is  True,  Everything  is  permitted”
became  theirs.  They  considered  the  Beat  Hotel  as  their  “Alamout”  from
which to “Blitzkrieg” the citadels of enlightenment whipping up a complete
derangement  of  the  senses  as  preached  by  earlier  Hashashins  like  Arthur
Rimbaud and Charles Baudelaire.

Gysin believed that homosexuality was a kind of cut-up. According to Terry
Wilson,  he  believed  that  ordinary  heterosexuality  reinforced  human  time  by
reproducing it. Orgasm was like a flash bulb capturing the same picture; the
difference  lay  in  the  fact  that  homosexuality  involved  no  physical
reproduction. Gysin was a shaman, taking long hours, once as long as 36, to
gaze  into  a  mirror.  Food,  cigarettes  or  joints  were  handed  to  him  as  he  sat
there.


background image

“All  sorts  of  things,  great  galleries  of  characters  running
through.  I  got  to  the  point  where  all  images  disappeared,
eventually after more than 24 hours of staring there seemed to be
a  limited  area  where  everything  was  covered  with  a  palpitating
cloud  of  smoke,  which  would  be  about  waist  high...  there  was
nothing beyond that.”

Gysin rejected any claims that such activities were dangerous: “People who
have some sort of mystic discipline are forever telling you that any personal
experimentation is dangerous, you must do it according to the rules they have
laid down, and I've never agreed with that either.” (Here To Go, Wilson)

Both  of  Gysin's  major  novels,  The  Process  and  Beat  Museum-Bardo  Hotel
have  their  roots  in  magical  philosophy.  The  Process  is  based  on  the  Islamic
maxim that “Life is like a vast desert.” In the book the central character sets
out  across  such  a  desert  which  takes  a  whole  lifetime  to  cross.  The  process
can  be  read  as  “The  Life  Process.”  The  book  is  also  about  “Intercultural
Penetration,” his own experience of Moroccan culture reflected in the central
character's total immersion into Arab life.

The second book Beat Museum-Bardo Hotel is a story inspired by the death
of  Ian  Sommerville  in  a  car  crash.  It  is  heavily  influenced  by  The  Tibetan
Book  of  the  Dead,  itself  a  description  of  after  death  experience.  This  eerie

and surreal book has never been published in its entirety. 


background image

WHO IS THERE WILLIAM BURROUGHS

JOHN GEIGER

What it was that Sir Ernest Shackleton's party encountered on their harrowing
crossing  of  South  Georgia  is  a  question  that  has  confounded  historians,  and


background image

inspired Sunday sermons for generations of true believers. The apparition—
which  the  explorer  called  the  Fourth  Presence—impressed  Shackleton  as
being not of this world. It made its appearance near the end of the explorer's
grandly  named  Imperial  Trans-Antarctic  Expedition  of  1914-16,  an
expedition which came perilously close to ending in mass disaster. The fact
that it did not is the foundation of Shackleton's legend. The expedition's ship
Endurance  was  trapped  and  then  crushed  by  ice  in  the  Weddell  Sea  even
before  he  could  embark  on  the  attempt  to  traverse  the  Antarctic  continent.
The retreating crew made an escape from the ice in small boats to Elephant
Island.  Knowing  there  was  no  chance  any  search  for  the  expedition  would
find them there, Shackleton decided to leave the majority of his crew behind,
take a small boat, its seams patched with artist's paints, and risk the extreme
perils of the ocean south of Cape Horn, “the most tempestuous area of water
in the world,” in order to reach a whaling station on the British possession of
South Georgia, 800 miles away.

After braving gales and freezing temperatures for more than two weeks, the
six men arrived at South Georgia in the midst of a hurricane, the small boat
driven  ashore  on  the  opposite  end  of  the  island  from  their  destination.
Leaving  the  others  with  the  boat,  Shackleton,  Commander  Frank  Worsley,
who had captained the lost Endurance, and Tom Crean, second officer, made
an  arduous  36  hour  crossing  of  the  ranges  and  glaciers  of  the  island.  They
marched  in  moonlight  and  in  fog.  They  ascended  carefully,  roped  together,
threading  around  crevasses  and  across  snowfields.  They  had  slender  rations
and  went  virtually  without  sleep.  At  one  point,  they  stood  on  an  ice  ridge,
uncertain of what was over the other side because of a sharp incline. With a
bank  of  fog  threatening  to  overtake  them,  they  opted  to  plunge  into  the
unknown.  At  that  point,  only  they  knew  the  whereabouts  of  all  the  other
expedition members. Had they dropped to their deaths, the entire expedition
might  have  been  doomed.  Instead,  they  placed  their  fate  in  Providence,  and
survived. During their traverse, Shackleton later reflected, “we three fellows
drew very close to each other, mostly in silence.” They eventually shambled
into the whaling station, barely recognizable as civilized men. Rescuers were
dispatched to collect the others, and all of the Endurance's crew survived the
ordeal.  They  were  not  untouched  by  the  experience.  “We  had  reached  the
naked soul of man,” Shackleton wrote in South, published in 1919.


background image

In  writing  his  narrative,  however,  Shackleton  had  struggled  with  something
unspoken. Leonard Tripp, a friend and confidant, was present as the explorer
tried to come to terms with it. Shackleton had tears in his eyes: “You could
see that the man was suffering, and then he came to this mention of the fourth
man.

1

 Shackleton explained his struggle in South: “One feels ‘the dearth of

human  words,  the  roughness  of  mortal  speech,’  in  trying  to  describe
intangible things, but a record of our journeys would be incomplete without
reference  to  a  subject  very  near  to  our  hearts.”  He  revealed  in  the  narrative
that  he  had  a  pervasive  sense,  during  that  last  and  worst  leg  of  his  journey,
that something out of ordinary experience accompanied them, a presence: “I
know that during that long and racking march of 36 hours over the unnamed
mountains and glaciers of South Georgia it seemed to me often that we were
four, not three.” He had said nothing to the others, but then three weeks later
Worsley  offered  without  prompting:  “Boss,  I  had  a  curious  feeling  on  the
march  that  there  was  another  person  with  us.”  Crean  later  confessed  to  the
same strange sensation.

Shackleton  at  first  did  not  mention  the  Fourth  Presence  to  anyone  else,  and
the passage alluding to it, which Tripp heard him dictate, was omitted in the
original  draft  of  South,  written  by  Shackleton  in  collaboration  with  Edward
Sanders  in  Australia  in  1917.  The  presence  does,  however,  appear  on  a


background image

separate  sheet  of  paper  labelled  “note”  in  another  typescript  of  the
manuscript.  Apparently  Shackleton  initially  withheld  the  passage,  before
deciding to include it in the final version of the manuscript. He did, however,
allude  to  it  during  some  of  his  public  lectures.  Recalled  one  person  who
attended a banquet in London given in his honor: “You could hear a pin drop
when  Sir  Ernest  spoke  of  his  consciousness  of  a  Divine  Companion  in  his
journeyings.”

Frank  W.  Boreham,  in  his  1926  book  A  Casket  of  Cameos,  cites  as
“testimony  concerning  his  Unseen  Comrade”  an  account  given  by  Ada  E.
Warden, who was present for a lecture by Shackleton given shortly before his
death, in 1922. Said Warden:

After repeating the story of the appalling voyage in the open boat
from Elephant Island to South Georgia, he quoted the words from
the one hundred and thirty-ninth Psalm: “If I take the wings of the
morning,  and  dwell  in  the  uttermost  parts  of  the  sea,  even  there
shall  Thy  hand  lead  me  and  Thy  right  hand  shall  hold  me.”  He
repeated  the  words  most  impressively,  and  said  they  were  a
continual source of strength to him.

2

So  was  the  Fourth  Presence,  as  the  one  listener  at  a
Shackleton  lecture  surmised,  the  guiding,  protective  hand  of
the “Divine Companion,” and as Boreham declared, “the Son
of  God”?  Or  was  it  something  of  equal  mystery,  if  not  glory
and power?

Boreham, a British writer and Baptist minister who lived much of his life in
New Zealand and Australia, took Shackleton's use of Scripture as proof of his
abiding  Christian  faith,  and  hence  as  a  clue  to  the  true  identity  of  the
presence. Boreham found support for his conviction in Daniel 3:24-5:

And  Nebuchandnezzar  the  king  was  astonished,  and  rose  up  in
haste,  and  spake,  and  said  unto  his  counsellors,  Did  we  not  cast
three  men  bound  into  the  midst  of  the  fire?  They  answered  and
said unto the king, True, 0 king.

He  answered  and  said,  Lo,  I  see  four  men  loose,  walking  in  the
midst of the fire, and they have no hurt; and the form of the fourth
is like the Son of God.


background image

“Boss,  I  had  a  curious  feeling  on  the  march  that  there  was
another person with us.”

Wrote Boreham: “Flame or frost; it makes no difference. A truth that, in one
age,  can  hold  its  own  in  a  burning  fiery  furnace  can,  in  another,  vindicate
itself  just  as  readily  amidst  fields  of  ice  and  snow.”  In  either  case  the  same
conclusion applied, Boreham argued: “the form of the fourth is like the Son
of God!”

So  was  the  Fourth  Presence,  as  the  one  listener  at  a  Shackleton  lecture
surmised,  the  guiding,  protective  hand  of  the  “Divine  Companion,”  and  as
Boreham declared, “the Son of God”? Or was it something of equal mystery,
if  not  glory  and  power?  In  their  accounts  of  Shackleton's  expedition,
historians have struggled with it, speculating that it was an hallucination, that
the  “toil  (was)  enough  to  cloud  their  consciousness.”

3

  The  possibility  was

even raised that it was “an attempt on Shackleton's part to court publicity, at a
time of national emotion, by producing his own ‘Angel of Mons.’

4

 This is a

reference to the First World War legend that an angel had appeared in the sky
during  the  British  retreat  from  Mons  during  August  1914,  safeguarding  the
British  army.  A  journalist  and  writer  of  fantasy  literature  later  said  he  had
invented  the  angel.  However,  the  writer  Harold  Begbie,  who  knew
Shackleton and wrote an appreciation of the explorer in 1922, also authored
On the Side of the Angels, which attempts to document that British soldiers
believed that angels had appeared to them.


background image

None  of  the  men  who  experienced  the  Fourth  Presence  on  South  Georgia
were ever definitive on the subject of their belief. In remarks made to Begbie,
Shackleton  remained  ambivalent:  “We  were  comrades  with  Death  all  the
time,  but  I  can  honestly  say  that  it  wasn't  bad.  We  always  felt  there  was
Something  Above.”  Shackleton  clearly  felt  he  had  undergone  a  mystical
experience,  but  did  not  elaborate.  Begbie  put  it  this  way:  “He  was  really
profoundly conscious of the spiritual reality which abides hidden in all visible
things.” A naval officer recalled Shackleton alluding to the presence during a
conversation:  “He  attempted  no  explanation.  ‘In  religion  I  am  what  I  am’
were his Vuords.

5

 Whatever it was they encountered, it remained with them

to the end. In one of his later lectures, Worsley, who died in 1943, referred to
a  party  of  four  men  making  the  crossing  of  South  Georgia.  Afterwards,  his
wife, Jean, pointed out his error. Worsley was stricken. “Whatever will they
think of me,” he said. “I can't get it out of my mind.”

6

T.  S.  Eliot  described  the  phenomenon  in  Part  V  of  The  Waste  Land,  first
published in 1922, the year of Shackleton's death:

Who  is  the  third  who  walks  always  beside  you?  When  I  count,
there  are  only  you  and  I  together  But  when  I  look  ahead  up  the
white  road  There  is  always  another  one  walking  beside  you.


background image

Gilding wrapt in a brown mantle, hooded I do not know whether a
man or woman—But who is that on the other side of you?

“Whatever will they think of me,” he said. “I can't get it out
of my mind.”

In his “Notes on The Waste Land,” Eliot wrote that the journey to Emmaus in
the Gospel According to Luke serves as a theme in Part V of the poem, which
he titled “What the Thunder said”. In Luke 24:15-17 two men on the road to
Emmaus encounter a presence and do not recognize it as the risen Christ:

7

And, behold, two of them went that same day to a village called
Emmaus, which was from Jerusalem about three score furlongs.

And they talked together of all these things which had happened.

And  it  came  to  pass,  that,  while  they  communed  together  and
reasoned, Jesus himself drew near, and went with them.

But their eyes were holden that they should not know him.

When Jesus blessed and broke bread at dinner, the disciples finally did know
him, but Jesus then vanished from their sight. In his “Notes” Eliot. however,
added  that  the  passage  in  question  was  also  stimulated  by  an  account  of  an
Antarctic  expedition,  “I  forget  which,  but  I  think  one  of  Shackleton's.”  The
poet was impressed by the idea that “the party of explorers, at the extremity
of their strength, had the constant delusion that there was one more member
than  could  actually  be  counted.”  The  tone  of  the  account  given  in  Eliot's
poem is notably different, however, from Shackleton's published reference to
a  presence  “very  near  to  our  hearts,”  and  instead  evokes  the  idea  that  they
were “comrades with Death.” Rather than inspiring a sense of the divine, one
critic argued, “the visitation in the poem inspires a feeling of dread.”

8


background image

Shackleton  confronted  the  phenomenon  at  a  point  of  extremity  on  his
geographic journey. The extra man, however, made another appearance in a
radically  dissimilar  context;  evidence,  perhaps,  that  exploration  is  not
confined to geographic expeditions—or even the physical world. In common
with polar explorers, William S. Burroughs, the American novelist and junky,
had  a  propensity  to  take  incalculable  risks.  The  author  of  Naked  Lunch,  a
harrowing  narrative  of  addiction,  sought  out  extremity  wherever  it  lay,  and
placed his literary endeavors explicitly in the context of exploration: “In my
writing  I  am  acting  as  a  map  maker,  an  explorer  of  psychic  areas  ...  a
cosmonaut  of  inner  space,  and  I  see  no  point  in  exploring  areas  that  have
already been thoroughly surveyed.

9

 It is significant, then, that Burroughs too

encountered  an  unseen  companion,  and  did  so  at  the  very  point  when  his
experiments with literature and drugs pushed the boundaries of physical and
psychological tolerance. Burroughs called the phenomenon the Third Mind.

Burroughs had a long-standing interest in exploration. He had read explorers'
narratives,  among  them  Richard  Halliburton's  New  Worlds  to  Conquer.  He
studied  anthropology  at  Columbia  University,  Harvard  University  and  at
Mexico  City  College.  Burroughs'  own  explorations  did  not  cover  the  polar


background image

regions  of  the  Earth,  so  much  as  the  tropics  of  the  mind,  the  source  for
literary imagination,

Burroughs called the phenomenon the “Third Mind.”

although  he  did  also  undertake  geographic  journeys.  Burroughs'  search  for
the  telepathic-hallucinogenic  drug  yage—used  by  Amazonian  Indians  for
finding lost souls—produced an epistolary account of his travels. Written to
his friend, the poet Allen Ginsberg in 1953, Burroughs' correspondence was
published  ten  years  later  as  The  Yage  Letters.  The  use  of  epistolary  as  a
device  for  documenting  explorations  can  be  traced  as  far  back  as  Richard
Hakluyt's The Principal Navigations Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of
the  English  Nation
,  published  in  1598.  In  style  and  in  substance,  The  Yage
Letters
 is a narrative of discovery. As with traditional exploration narratives,
the title implies the goal, that is, the investigation of yage as a tool to reach
the  unknown.  In  his  early  critical  examination  of  Burroughs's  writing,  Alan
Ansen  notes  that  “the  actual  discovery  of  the  drug  plays  a  relatively  small
part  in  the  work;  at  the  center  are  the  anthropologist's  field  report  and
Burroughs'  life  in  yage.”  The  goal  is  merely  the  tool  through  which  the
explorer finds what he is looking for along the

“A  Colombian  scientist  isolated  from  yage  a  drug  he  called
telepathine.  I  know  from  my  own  experience  telepathy  is  a
fact.  I  have  no  interest  in  proving  telepathy  or  anything  to
anybody. I do want usable knowledge of telepathy.”

way. In South, Shackleton's goal was, of necessity, abandoned early on. What
mattered  was  the  journey,  and  ultimately  his  glimpse  of  the  “naked  soul.”
Burroughs' narrative in The Yage Letters adheres to a similar form.

The groundwork for Burroughs's yage search was laid at the end of Junky, his
first novel, published in 1953. In the book, he noted the drug is “supposed to
increase  telepathic  sensitivity.  A  Colombian  scientist  isolated  from  yage  a
drug  he  called  telepathine.  I  know  from  my  own  experience  telepathy  is  a
fact. I have no interest in proving telepathy or anything to anybody. I do want
usable knowledge of telepathy.” Burroughs wanted to understand what others
were  thinking,  but  he  also  saw  more  practical  applications  for  telepathic
powers:  “thought  control.  Take  anyone  apart  and  rebuild  to  your  taste.”
Usually a concoction of the vine Banisteriopsis caapi with secondary plants,
yage  is  used  by  Amazonian  Indians  for  its  “meet  your  maker”  powers,  in


background image

order to achieve communion with surroundings, to incite visions of cities and
places,  and  as  a  way  of  blurring  the  boundaries  between  this  world  and  the
next.  The  Ecuadorian  geographer  Villavicencio  was  one  of  the  earliest
explorers  to  write  about  yage,  in  1858:  “I've  experienced  dizziness,  then  an
aerial  journey  in  which  I  recall  perceiving  the  most  gorgeous  views,  great
cities,  lofty  towers,  beautiful  parks  and  other  extremely  attractive  objects;
then  I  imagine  myself  to  be  alone  in  a  forest  and  assaulted  by  a  number  of
terrible  beings  from  which  I  defended  myself.”

10

  Some  have  also  indicated

that the often overwhelming purgative side effects are a form of purification.
The hallucinations are visual, aural, sensory. These properties, together with
the  previously  claimed  telepathic  powers,  suggested  to  Burroughs  that  yage
“may be the final fix.”

11

In  January  1953,  while  investigating  yage  at  a  university  in  Bogota,
Colombia,  Burroughs  encountered  Richard  Evans  Schultes,  a  Harvard
University  anthropologist  and  authority  on  hallucinogenic  plants.  Schultes
told Burroughs he had tried yage: “I got colors but no visions.”

12

 To obtain

the drug, Burroughs was advised to go down the Rio Putumayo. He traveled
south  to  Mocoa,  where  he  found  a  brujo,  or  medicine  man,  who  prepared  a
weak yage extraction. Burroughs experienced vivid dreams in color and saw
a composite city, part New York, part Mexico City and part Lima. “You are
supposed  to  see  a  city  when  you  take  yage,”  he  wrote  Ginsberg  on  28
February. Burroughs next managed to attach himself to a cocoa commission
expedition.  In  the  company  of  the  botanists,  he  made  the  connection  with
another brujo, around 70 years of age, with “a sly gentleness about him like
an  old  time  junkie.”  The  brujo  incanted  “yage  mucho  da,”  or  “yage  give
much” as he prepared the concoction. Burroughs drank about an ounce of the
oily and phosphorescent liquid. Within two minutes of ingesting it, a wave of
dizziness swept over him and the hut began to spin. There was a strange blue
light.  Sudden,  violent  nausea  sent  him  rushing  outside,  he  vomited,  and
collapsed, arms and legs twitching uncontrollably. He wrote: “Larval beings
passed before my eyes in a blue haze, each one giving an obscene, mocking
squawk.” He continued to vomit, and it later occurred to Burroughs that yage
nausea is motion sickness of transport to the yage state. On 10 July he wrote
his  final  letter  from  the  region  to  Ginsberg.  He  described  his  ultimate  yage
experience,  witnessing  migrations,  incredible  journeys  through  geographic
places, and finally “the Composite City where all human potentials are spread


background image

out  in  a  vast  silent  market.”  From  this  city  expeditions  left  for  unknown
places, with unknown purpose. It was, Bur